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  • #46
    200 pages into Flashback by Dan Simmons. Thinking of shelving it. Anyone read and think I should continue?? Thanks.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Uncephalized View Post
      Just finished the First Law trilogy (The Blade Itself, Before They Are Hanged, and Last Argument of Kings), by Joe Abercrombie. Those were quite good. Before that I read Spellwright by Blake Charlton, which was just OK, kind of amateurish, but it's his first novel. I have the sequel from the library and I'll probably read it when I run out of novels. Right now I'm reading Magician: Apprentice, which is Raymond Feist's first fantasy novel.
      The Abercrombie books are great! He wrote a couple more, which were good but not as compelling as the original trilogy.
      I've been chewing through books since getting an iPad - that "one-click" book shopping on Amazon is going to be the death of my bank account. So far, loved the Deborah Harkness books (A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night) and got into Gillian Flynn too.

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      • #48
        I just read Shanghai Girls by Lisa See, and next on the list is the sequel, Dreams of Joy. I recently discovered that I can get e-books from our library, so I've been reading lots lately!


        Goal: Feel good, be active!

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        • #49
          Recently finished: Chromophobia by David Batchelor
          Up next: The Sublime Object of Ideology by Slavoj Žižek

          I wish I had time for a novel right now...even the time I log on here is when I am sick of trying to write my paper.
          Female, age 51, 5' 9"
          SW - 183 (Jan 22, 2012), CW - 159, GW - healthy.

          Met my 2012 goals by losing 24 pounds.
          2013 goals are to get fit and strong!

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Mike in Virginia View Post
            The Case for Gold, by Ron Paul and Lewis Lehrman. Flame away, all who have no understanding of basic economics.
            I understand that I don't want productive activity and trade controlled by an arbitrary metal.

            I'd heartily recommend Debt: The First 5,000 Years, but only if you're ready for a challenge.

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            • #51
              Just finished Swamplandia.

              Can I ask a Kindle touch question? Is the contrast background/writing just a lot less pronounced than in a book? I feel like I need strong light to read the Kidle and have stopped doing it. Doesn't seem right, but it's brand new.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Rojo View Post
                Debt: The First 5,000 Years by David Graeber. Fantastic. An anarchist anthropologist, he takes to task both left and right, undermines the idea of the "barter system" (it basically never existed) and shows that credit came before money. That Adam Smith ripped off a Persian writer from several hundred years earlier. Recommended.
                Graeber is one of my academic heroes.

                Currently reading Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History, by Stephen Jay Gould.
                “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                Owly's Journal

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                • #53
                  Oh man, so I picked up Game of Thrones a couple days ago. I'm friggin' hooked, I can't stop reading this damn book!!!!
                  "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Leida View Post
                    My library carries absolutely everything he's written, but I stalled on the civilizations book, all that touchy-feely stuff about Montana... very different from his other writings.
                    I enjoyed Collapse, but not the Montana parts as much as the Greenland stuff, which was interesting.

                    Originally posted by Zanna View Post
                    The Abercrombie books are great! He wrote a couple more, which were good but not as compelling as the original trilogy.
                    I've been chewing through books since getting an iPad - that "one-click" book shopping on Amazon is going to be the death of my bank account. So far, loved the Deborah Harkness books (A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night) and got into Gillian Flynn too.
                    Haha yeah, I put a moratorium on my book-buying habit for a while. I am using the library and other sources of free books only for a while. I was listening to a lot of audiobooks for a while and damn, are those pricey. And they don't seem to drop the price as time goes by like they do for paper books, either--the Clan of the Cave Bear books were like $20 a pop and those have been around for 20+ years!
                    Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

                    My Primal Journal

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                    • #55
                      How to Read a Painting: Lessons from the Old Masters by Patrick de Rynck
                      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Uncephalized View Post
                        I enjoyed Collapse, but not the Montana parts as much as the Greenland stuff, which was interesting.

                        Haha yeah, I put a moratorium on my book-buying habit for a while. I am using the library and other sources of free books only for a while. I was listening to a lot of audiobooks for a while and damn, are those pricey. And they don't seem to drop the price as time goes by like they do for paper books, either--the Clan of the Cave Bear books were like $20 a pop and those have been around for 20+ years!
                        I thought his justification for the Montana stuff, which did rather read like a love letter, which was that any society is made up of individuals with sometimes competing priorities did do what he intented and gave the reader a new prism through which to view the historical societies. On rereading it though I did find his writing style difficult. Suddenly it seemed like lecture notes that had been transcribed and that rather grated.
                        I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Boneidle24seven View Post
                          Into the Wild!
                          Superb Book!!!!
                          “But a smell shivered him awake.It was a scent as old as the world. It was a hundred aromas of a thousand places. It was the tang of pine needles. It was the musk of sex. It was the muscular rot of mushrooms. It was the spice of oak. Meaty and redolent of soil and bark and herb. It was bats and husks and burrows and moss. It was solid and alive - so alive! And it was close"

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                          • #58
                            The Lost City of Z - David Grann
                            AWOL on the Appalachian Trail - David Miller

                            Lose yourself in a book and let your imagination wander!
                            “But a smell shivered him awake.It was a scent as old as the world. It was a hundred aromas of a thousand places. It was the tang of pine needles. It was the musk of sex. It was the muscular rot of mushrooms. It was the spice of oak. Meaty and redolent of soil and bark and herb. It was bats and husks and burrows and moss. It was solid and alive - so alive! And it was close"

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                            • #59
                              Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens

                              Mmmmmmmm, ccccchhhhhiiiiiccccckkkkeeeennnnn.....

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                              • #60
                                Just read Folks, This Ain't Normal: A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World by Joel Salatin
                                The Champagne of Beards

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