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Problem with free range chicken feet?

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  • Problem with free range chicken feet?

    Today I got about 1.5 pounds of chicken feet from a local farm. They are 100% free range, natural, etc. I bought chicken feet before, but only at the grocery store. This is my first time buying through a local small farm that raises the chickens naturally.

    Anyway, the chicken I got today all had this black callous on the bottom of their foot. The callouses almost looked like an abnormal growth. It was strange, the chicken feet from the supermarket did NOT have this callous... The callouses were like scabs. They were discolored-brown. The callouses were a part of the chicken foot, I had to cut them out. I don't think that this is normal? I am in the process of contacting the farm that I got these from to see what this is. I figured I'd also ask on here.

    I did a bit of research online, and apparently sometimes chickens can get an infection which can create scabs on the bottom of their feet. Not sure if that is what these chickens had.

    If anyone can help me, I'd appreciate it. I'm kinda bummed out because I was really excited to make stock with the chicken feet. Has anyone gotten chicken feet from a farm and seen these callouses? Should I just throw the feet away?

  • #2
    Um, don't eat calloused chicken-feet. Those chickens have been working out, and have picked up some locker room fungus. Actually, don't eat chicken feet, okay?

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    • #3
      Can you load a picture or describe the callouses better.

      There is a condition that occurs in chickens called Bumblefoot... but it is usually only in a very few birds. It is caused by injuring the bottoms of the feet sometimes by splintery perches or cuts from hard surfaces.
      It generally looks like a large swollen round area in the center of the foot with a round brown scab in the center.
      Like I said... rarely are many of the chickens in a single flock affected IME.

      If the 'callouses' are long and shaped more like the chickens regular foot then my guess is that you possibly got un-peeled feet. Grocery store feet have been dropped into boiling water to scald them and had the outer skin/scale surface membrane peeled off.
      If yours have not been peeled they need to be before making stock with them.
      “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
      ~Friedrich Nietzsche
      And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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      • #4
        What Cori said.

        Plus, I would prefer feet that have evidence of free ranging than those of chooks stuck in barn too tight to move.

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        • #5
          Here is a picture of the calluses I am talking about: Chicken Feet.jpg

          If the 'callouses' are long and shaped more like the chickens regular foot then my guess is that you possibly got un-peeled feet.
          When I got the chicken feet, I scalded them in hot water and then peeled the yellowish "lining" off of the feet. However, the "callouses" did not come off with the yellow lining. It was as if the callouses were a growth or something?

          Not sure... I'm waiting to hear back from the farm. If it is an infection, then is it okay if I still use the chicken feet for eating? I cut the callouses off.

          Thanks for the advice everyone!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Theresa92 View Post
            Here is a picture of the calluses I am talking about: [ATTACH]8736[/ATTACH]

            When I got the chicken feet, I scalded them in hot water and then peeled the yellowish "lining" off of the feet. However, the "callouses" did not come off with the yellow lining. It was as if the callouses were a growth or something?

            Not sure... I'm waiting to hear back from the farm. If it is an infection, then is it okay if I still use the chicken feet for eating? I cut the callouses off.

            Thanks for the advice everyone!
            Can you load the picture to Photobucket or similar host and then repost it... if not it will be a very long time before I see the pics... the mods are SLOW at pic approval.

            However... if the callouses were easily trimmed away and did not have abscesses under them (an abscess looks like a hole in the foot) then I would say with all confidence that it was NOT a Bumblefoot infection...
            They were simply callouses from living a more natural life... enjoy making stock with the feet!
            Last edited by cori93437; 08-05-2012, 01:42 PM.
            “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
            ~Friedrich Nietzsche
            And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

            Comment


            • #7
              a farmer who is going through the effort of raising and selling free-range birds would not stay in business long if he was selling infected parts.

              my feet have callouses and are not infected.
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              – Ernest Hemingway

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              • #8
                Can you load the picture to Photobucket or similar host and then repost it... if not it will be a very long time before I see the pics... the mods are SLOW at pic approval.
                Image - TinyPic - Free Image Hosting, Photo Sharing & Video Hosting Here's a link! If you look at the picture, you can see that I already pulled the yellow lining off the right foot but the callous is still there. The callous isn't part of the yellow lining, it seems to be a part of the actual foot. I was able to cut them out. I did research the BumbleFoot infection that you talked about. If I'm correct, if a chicken has bumblefoot then you probably shouldn't eat the feet since it can be a serious infection?

                a farmer who is going through the effort of raising and selling free-range birds would not stay in business long if he was selling infected parts.
                That's exactly what I was thinking haha! I just want to make sure it is normal though. I don't want any strange sort of callous going into my awesome stock

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                • #9
                  Those feet are perfectly fine.

                  Chickens who have access to natural terrain get thicker skin on the bottoms just like people, and sometimes get small injuries that can result in scarring and discoloration.

                  That is definitely NOT Bumblefoot which is an abscess of a staph type infection that generally happens after a deep injury, and is easy to identify. (Also curable with proper care.)

                  Enjoy your feet!
                  “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                  ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                  And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Awesome! I'm glad I don't have to throw them away. Thanks so much for the help

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                    • #11
                      lovely feet! nom nom them!

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