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  • Minimalist lifestyle

    Back shortly after I read, and embraced, the primal lifestyle, I started on the journey on becoming a minimalist. To me it was a natural progression into becoming more primal. Now I'm not living in a cave and using a rock as a pillow but I have cut back on much of what I used to consider essential, it has simplified my life and I'm saving money because I have found out that the less that I have, the less that I need.

    From a primal standpoint, it makes sense to be a minimalist. If you have stopped embracing CW in what you eat, shop for, etc and if you are wearing minimalist shoes, like VFF, you have already started minimizing some areas in your life.

    As some on the forum have done, sleeping on the floor, going barefoot, not using a microwave has taken you either further down that path.

    It has become enough of an interest for me that I decided to start a FB group (I know, I know, not another FB group, please!) but if any of you are interested on focusing on that area, you are welcome to join the group.

    Here is the link:

    Minimalist group
    Last edited by texas.grok; 07-13-2012, 01:52 AM.
    Randal
    AKA: Texas Grok

    Originally posted by texas.grok
    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
    http://hardcoremind.com/

  • #2
    I should have mentioned that I have to "friend" you on FB before I can add you to the group. I think this will work, my FB page is: http://www.facebook.com/texas.grok. Send me a friends request and I will accept, then add you to the group.

    Sorry about that, just realized this.
    Last edited by texas.grok; 07-13-2012, 03:02 AM.
    Randal
    AKA: Texas Grok

    Originally posted by texas.grok
    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
    http://hardcoremind.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      it's been my deal for a while, but I do sleep on a bed. i gave the old floor-sleeping a whirl and just went back to bed.

      Comment


      • #4
        I put in a request and sent ya a message. My life revolves around computers (tech support as my job), but I am trying to live a more minimalist life outside of work. Lately I have not been on the computer much at home, since my favorite video games are kind of boring right now. I've always struggled with boredom and need new ideas for stuff to do that's free. Once I get/make some decent minimalist shoes (asphalt is too hot for me to go barefoot for long in this weather), I will be taking walks in the evening.
        Depression Lies

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        • #5
          I'm going to sound like an ass, but seeing people talk about minimalist living - while on computers/phones surfing the net, makes me giggle.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Lily Marie View Post
            I'm going to sound like an ass, but seeing people talk about minimalist living - while on computers/phones surfing the net, makes me giggle.
            Doesn't make you sound like an ass Lily, just logical. The computer and internet have become less of gadgets and more essential tools anymore. For me, they are business critical tools that I also use for pleasure and personal research. Hell, even Buddhist are on the internet anymore. And, IMHO, part of a minimalist life.

            Cell phones have evolved from gadgets to tools that have saved lives, simplify our lives sometimes replacing several other things all in one package (phone, laptop, etc).

            The difference, I think, is that minimalist use these tools to their greatest potential and don't rush out to buy the latest, greatest version until theirs breaks.

            For me it is an indispensable communications tool where I can keep up with not only my business but also talk to my family via Skype from the other side of the world as little or no cost.

            Grok likely would not have used a computer, damn hard to get an internet signal in a cave.
            Randal
            AKA: Texas Grok

            Originally posted by texas.grok
            Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
            http://hardcoremind.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm a minimalist -- however one defines that. I live a comfortable life with a minimal of 'things'. I'm not a 'shopper' -- I'm a 'buyer' of items I need -- food, some clothes, 1 pair of running shoes, 1 pair of earrings, 1 purse. We live in the age of being stressed out of our minds and 'shopping' has become an obsession. My four children and I lived in a small house, without closets (it was an older home). Our rule was, if you didn't have a spot for it, you didn't purchase it. We lived well, and happy and purchased many things from 2nd hand stores. I'm not a perfect minimalist (obviously I'm on my computer right now), but if I were to die tomorrow, my kids could 'divvy' up my things in under 4 hours.
              ----------------------------------------
              F, 48, 5'10"
              Start Date: 25-06-12 @ 161lbs
              Goal Reached: 30-09-12 @ 143lb. Now bouncing between 145lb - 149lb. I'd like less bounce and more consistency :-)

              Started Cross Fit 20.12.12 ---- Can't wait to submit my success story on the 1st anniversary of starting primal.

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              • #8
                Maybe being "minimalist" isnt just referring to the number/type of things we own, but avoiding clutter mentally and emotionally as well.

                Although I do find it easier to relax and enjoy my surroundings when they are not filled with "stuff".

                Ditto on the rule of only getting things if you have room for them. With 12 people in our family, there is just not much space for lots of personal posessions :-)

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                • #9
                  We have been working on minimizing our "stuff" the past few months and it is a very enjoyable and relaxing exercise. So much less to worry about, fewer messes to clear up all the time, and more room to actually move around in our house.

                  EDIT: I should add that this is all a part of our general push to spend less, save more, and eventually become financially independent by our early- to mid-30s so that we can live our lives voluntarily instead of the majority of our time being taken up by necessary evils (like 9 to 5 jobs). So far it's pretty fun.
                  Last edited by Uncephalized; 07-13-2012, 11:52 AM.
                  Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

                  My Primal Journal

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                  • #10
                    Annie Leonard also pushed me this direction when I read "The story of stuff", The Story of Stuff Project.

                    She gets deep into the story on how we went from savvy consumers who only bought what we needed to a society that lines up to by the latest, greatest ICrap just because it is new.

                    It boils down to planned obsolescence. When I was growing up, my mom had kitchen appliances that lasted many years, I think she still has some of them. But companies figured out that when they made a blender that lasted 10 years or more, they were only going to sell a single blender, per family, each decade. So they started making things that either broke down quicker or, through perceived obsolescence, people thought something was obsolete technology or out of fashion.

                    Excellent book.
                    Randal
                    AKA: Texas Grok

                    Originally posted by texas.grok
                    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
                    http://hardcoremind.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Unceph, good idea. Whenever I have anyone in my apartment, I get a "You could get a couche here..." No, don't need one. I suppose I could get rid of things, but not sure how much to get rid of or what.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Figlio di Moros View Post
                        I suppose I could get rid of things, but not sure how much to get rid of or what.
                        I ended up with a 6 month rule. If I did not use it in the past 6 months, I didn't figure I would use it in the next 6. Of course this doesn't apply to everything, like first-aid kits and fire extinguishers but for the more mundane things, it has worked well.

                        Here in Egypt, I ended up giving a bunch of clothes and kitchen stuff to my housekeeper. In the US, it goes to a local charity.
                        Randal
                        AKA: Texas Grok

                        Originally posted by texas.grok
                        Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
                        http://hardcoremind.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Too broke for charity; actually, selling a bunch of shirts and buying a new pair of jeans or two isn't a bad idea. Funny how everyone likes to give you a bunch of shirts they think is cute that you'll never wear, but you have to replace your jeans on your own.

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                          • #14
                            Sent you a friend request and a short message. I've been contemplating simplifying my life and minimizing...especially distractions. My primary work is personal training, but I'm also a blogger and attempting to become a writer of fitness-related educational material. My main issue is distractions. The more you have, the easier it is to become distracted...
                            Josh Vernier, CPT

                            My Journal

                            Evolution Revolution Fitness

                            "The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."

                            -Ayn Rand

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=texas.grok;899542]Annie Leonard also pushed me this direction when I read "The story of stuff", The Story of Stuff Project.QUOTE]

                              My two oldest daughters and I went to a free local college showing of "The Story of Stuff" as part of the town's annual Sustainability Festival. Good viewing. They also showed "Bag It", which is the story of single-use plastic bags - the ones at the grocery stores. We saw both.

                              This family is a stuff family. That said, I have a philosophy something like this: everything you own must have be easily accessible; have a permanent home in a closet (or equivalent); and you must use it regularly. The only things barred from the use-it-regularly rule are intensely personal, usually highly irreplacable items like wedding photos and family jewelry. We trade with Goodwill, the Salvation Army, a local Hospice store, etc. often. With 4 kids and 2 adults who each have wildly varying interests, stuff accumulates. The kids are growing up weeding often, and we don't have any of those rented storage rooms or storage pods. Our garage does house our cars, too.

                              Having almost nothing in the house? Nah - couldn't do it. It's all well and good for singles, but try that with a pack of active and intellectually hungry young 'uns. Buy quality so you only buy once, though? Yup!
                              I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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