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Do You, Personally, Kill Your Own Meat?

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  • #61
    Pigs stink, especially if it gets rainy where you are. If it does, expect them to dig right out of the pen. Hotwire helps, but they will dig up to it and then ground it out with mud. Best to keep them on concrete. Rotate their pen yearly or nothing but nothing will live where they were for several years.

    Yes, they will escape. No, they are neither clean nor intelligent. Be sure to ring their noses, it will help keep them in: And I mean multiple rings, so they look like porcine punk rockers. They will also bite, preferably you, but definitely any small child near their pen, and they are filthy, so their bites become infected easily.

    That said, they are great waste disposals: offal, innards, skin, feathers, spoilt milk, the scrapings from plates, soaked beans, corn, your LDS neighbor's spoilt food storage---they will eat it. Also ducks, chickens, eggs, and anything else.

    If they didn't taste so damn good, no-one would bother with them.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by fuzzylogic View Post
      Pigs stink, especially if it gets rainy where you are. If it does, expect them to dig right out of the pen. Hotwire helps, but they will dig up to it and then ground it out with mud. Best to keep them on concrete. Rotate their pen yearly or nothing but nothing will live where they were for several years.

      Yes, they will escape. No, they are neither clean nor intelligent. Be sure to ring their noses, it will help keep them in: And I mean multiple rings, so they look like porcine punk rockers. They will also bite, preferably you, but definitely any small child near their pen, and they are filthy, so their bites become infected easily.

      That said, they are great waste disposals: offal, innards, skin, feathers, spoilt milk, the scrapings from plates, soaked beans, corn, your LDS neighbor's spoilt food storage---they will eat it. Also ducks, chickens, eggs, and anything else.

      If they didn't taste so damn good, no-one would bother with them.
      Dang! What are you raising, feral hogs??

      If you're raising a weaner pig, they go to slaughter about 6 months old, 220#, nothing to worry about. They get a little pushy at that age, but not rabid or anything. They like being scratched on the back, and come running for treats. They keep pretty clean, unless it's hot and you run a sprinkler for them to make mud. Since they're only there 4 months or so, the pen doesn't get that bad, as long as you give them some elbow room.

      Hog panels with a run of hot wire maybe 6-8" off the ground works fine, no matter how much mud they make. If you make a habit of checking your critters & fences often, you don't get any surprise escapes. I've seen a lot of crap-ass set ups though...baling twine & bedframes don't quite cut it for pig pens.

      If you're keeping breeding stock, that's a whole nother story, but still not that big a deal.
      Seven Trees Farm - diversified subsistence farming on 1.25 acres.

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      • #63
        There's a sweet Waitrose video on YouTube of a pig farmer in Wiltshire and his free range outdoor bred pigs who come up and push at him for a stroke and cuddle

        In the UK all meat has to be inspected as fit for human consumption so smallholders aren't allowed to slaughter their own sheep, cattle and pigs. I think some farms have their own abattoirs if big enough. Not sure about poultry, I guess it depends if it's being sold or not.

        As a kid I went shooting with a .410 but only ever got one rabbit and the dog nicked it from the kitchen table before I could show anyone I was more successful fishing in Canada. I'm not bothered about the actual shooting or fishing, but I don't do the gutting eww

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        • #64
          I haven't been with the military (choose the red cross for my service year) so i am not allowed to wear a gun for another year.
          So no shooting. Fishing is boring to me, so i do it like the godfather, i point someone else kills i eat. But i wouldn't mind killing my own meals.

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          • #65
            i've been fishing and shooting guns and bows my entire life, and hunting since i was 10 years old. i've caught countless fish, and i've killed squirrels, rabbits, pheasants, ducks, geese, and deer. and in all honesty, only the killing of a deer elicits a strong emotional response. i mean, i am thankful and grateful for all of my bounty, but every time i shoot a deer i feel a mix of complete joy and a bit of sadness. and every time i approach the deer, i make sure it is dead, then i place my hand on it and thank it. i take a minute to look around at where i am and feel how lucky i am to do what i have done. i soak it all in. then the hard work begins. gutting, dragging, hanging, skinning, butchering, etc. none of that stuff is any fun at all. but proper care of the animal and the meat is paramount. just as important as making a clean and ethical kill shot.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
              ... just as important as making a clean and ethical kill shot.
              My biggest cause of anxiety over hunting is efficiently killing the animal. I'm taking up bow hunting this year and you can bet I'll be very comfortable with my accuracy before I start throwing broad heads at a deer.
              I do have a pretty big soft spot though. I let a little doe past last season because she still had a fawn with her. Most folks I talk to say that the fawns can survive or are big enough to be taken if they've lost their spots. This one didn't have spots, but couldn't have weighed more than 30-40lbs, plus the doe was small too. If I'd have killed the doe, I might as well have killed the fawn then too, because I just don't think it would have lasted.
              If I just said LOL, I lied. Do or do not. There is no try.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by justyouraveragecavemen View Post
                My biggest cause of anxiety over hunting is efficiently killing the animal. I'm taking up bow hunting this year and you can bet I'll be very comfortable with my accuracy before I start throwing broad heads at a deer.
                I do have a pretty big soft spot though. I let a little doe past last season because she still had a fawn with her. Most folks I talk to say that the fawns can survive or are big enough to be taken if they've lost their spots. This one didn't have spots, but couldn't have weighed more than 30-40lbs, plus the doe was small too. If I'd have killed the doe, I might as well have killed the fawn then too, because I just don't think it would have lasted.
                practice every day. and the best piece of advice i can give about archery shooting was given to me by a world class, highly decorated competition archer. he told me "perfect practice makes perfect." when you practice, make sure your stance is perfect. make sure you are relaxed, proper grip with both hands, proper position from head to toe. smooth draw. proper breathing, etc. if any of those things is off, then let off, take a few breaths and try again. don't practce the shot until everything else is right. and practice from where you will be hunting. if you're in a treestand, practice from a treestand. if using a ground blind and sitting on a stool, practice that way.
                also, if shooting a compound, have it tuned by a reputable bowshop. a properly tuned bow with properly matched arrows will make life a ton easier. it will give you consistency that you can't get any other way. maybe even take a lesson or two if you need to. trust me on this one. PM me if you have any questions

                i'm kind of a softy that way too. i won't shoot a young doe with a fawn, or even shoot a fawn. i have heard of guys who love shooting fawns. they compare it to veal. no way. not me.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
                  practice every day. and the best piece of advice i can give about archery shooting was given to me by a world class, highly decorated competition archer. he told me "perfect practice makes perfect." when you practice, make sure your stance is perfect. make sure you are relaxed, proper grip with both hands, proper position from head to toe. smooth draw. proper breathing, etc. if any of those things is off, then let off, take a few breaths and try again. don't practce the shot until everything else is right. and practice from where you will be hunting. if you're in a treestand, practice from a treestand. if using a ground blind and sitting on a stool, practice that way.
                  also, if shooting a compound, have it tuned by a reputable bowshop. a properly tuned bow with properly matched arrows will make life a ton easier. it will give you consistency that you can't get any other way. maybe even take a lesson or two if you need to. trust me on this one. PM me if you have any questions

                  i'm kind of a softy that way too. i won't shoot a young doe with a fawn, or even shoot a fawn. i have heard of guys who love shooting fawns. they compare it to veal. no way. not me.
                  Thanks, dude. I think you've hit on some things that I need to change in my practice. I'll be hunting from a stand, so I need to get a clamp-on or something for home (going to a big regional type hunting expo next week) and when I practice, my oldest boy has to come out and practice with his nerf bow as well. So I have one eye on where he is at all times and it really distracts me; I might have to practice when he's not at home, which would be more in the heat of the day. But thanks, I may take you up on the PMing if I have any questions.
                  If I just said LOL, I lied. Do or do not. There is no try.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by justyouraveragecavemen View Post
                    Thanks, dude. I think you've hit on some things that I need to change in my practice. I'll be hunting from a stand, so I need to get a clamp-on or something for home (going to a big regional type hunting expo next week) and when I practice, my oldest boy has to come out and practice with his nerf bow as well. So I have one eye on where he is at all times and it really distracts me; I might have to practice when he's not at home, which would be more in the heat of the day. But thanks, I may take you up on the PMing if I have any questions.
                    cool. i don't mind at all, and i can point you in the direction of some good websites too

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                    • #70
                      I'm not sure what it takes to go from the emotional connection to the butchering. I just... do it. When I'm cleaning a rabbit I just bagged, mostly what is going through my head is how I intend to prepare it. If I snared it while camping, I'll usually toss it on a spit immediately. Sometimes I enjoy a rabbit that has been frozen through first, in order to create a more tender meal.

                      So maybe that would work for you? Think of it as just another step in eating. Like cutting an onion or preparing a brine.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Jiigigaw View Post
                        I'm not sure what it takes to go from the emotional connection to the butchering. I just... do it. When I'm cleaning a rabbit I just bagged, mostly what is going through my head is how I intend to prepare it. If I snared it while camping, I'll usually toss it on a spit immediately. Sometimes I enjoy a rabbit that has been frozen through first, in order to create a more tender meal.

                        So maybe that would work for you? Think of it as just another step in eating. Like cutting an onion or preparing a brine.
                        That is where my nephews are at. If they see deer in the field, the comments start at Yum and go on to rhapsodize about good venison meals.

                        Once, a few years ago, a neighbor gave me a rabbit they had bagged. The head and guts and skin were off, but the feet were still on.

                        Chopping off those furry little bunny feet was not the easiest thing. But I managed to tough it out because the rabbit was already dead and I didn't want to waste good meat, and I actually did a bit of what you suggest. I just kept repeating "rabbit stew... rabbit stew" and sometimes it was more of a yell...
                        Last edited by Crabbcakes; 07-11-2012, 08:27 AM.
                        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by fuzzylogic View Post
                          Pigs stink, especially if it gets rainy where you are. If it does, expect them to dig right out of the pen. Hotwire helps, but they will dig up to it and then ground it out with mud. Best to keep them on concrete. Rotate their pen yearly or nothing but nothing will live where they were for several years.

                          Yes, they will escape. No, they are neither clean nor intelligent. Be sure to ring their noses, it will help keep them in: And I mean multiple rings, so they look like porcine punk rockers. They will also bite, preferably you, but definitely any small child near their pen, and they are filthy, so their bites become infected easily.

                          .
                          Sounds like the blanket description of every farm animal ever kept - when taken care of improperly.

                          Crowded animals stink. Neglected animals are mean and bite. Stupid animals(which happen to be smarter than dogs) are so because they get no stimulation.

                          You could say the same for a pen full of dogs that you don't interact with. You'll have a pen full of biting ferals.


                          That being said, I have never hunted, but I've killed chickens and gutted many rabbits. I don't have a problem with killing my own meat. I do respect the animals and thank them - though I do find it hard to call it "sacrificing themselves." They aren't giving their life, I am taking it. There is a difference.

                          I can't wait to get my rabbit house up and running. I'll know that my food is well taken care of and properly dispatched.
                          Last edited by Lily Marie; 07-11-2012, 09:55 AM.

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