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  • #31
    Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
    Uncephalized, just FYI - my daughter's OT (very smart lady) told me this: everybody has sensory difficulties. Seriously. Everybody has things they can't stand that others think are nuts, or cravings for certain sounds or movements or textures... it is when these over- or under-sensitivities start causing problems in the living of your daily life that therapy is in order.
    Oh yeah don't worry, I'm not about to start running around telling people I have SPD. My sensitivities are real and annoying but very minor. It's just that when I got to thinking about them I realized I actually have quite a few. Writing my thoughts out helps me organize them so I tend to ramble introspectively a lot.

    Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
    There are seven senses in the OT world - the classic five, plus two more (proprioception: feedback from the muscles and joints and vestibular: feedback from the movement of the head). Practically nobody has heard of them outside of the therapy world, but they are simply senses just as important to our correct functioning as hearing, sight, smell, taste and touch. IMHO, they should be taught in grade school, along with the others. The only one Major-daughter doesn't have problems with is smell.
    Interesting. I knew proprioception, and vestibular rang a tiny bell in a dim corner of memory so I must have heard it somewhere but forgotten it.
    Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

    My Primal Journal

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Gravyboat View Post
      Hi No, I've never gone to therapy for it. My mom has always just sighed exasperatedly and rolled her eyes at my "weirdness". So I just deal with it however I need to. I used to not be able to wear any clothing with tags or pockets or rough seams, or white clothing (bleaching made the fibers rougher and it felt like sandpaper to me). I still hate socks and still can't stand loud noises. Some colors make me feel nauseous (especially pinks and oranges). I still have aversions to certain textures. I used to have a problem with touching paper, and I still can't stand the idea of eating anything off a wooden stick. Thinking about biting down on wood makes me want to scream in horror. I also can't stand repetitive, absentminded rubbing, like if a partner is sitting next to me on the couch with their arm around me and keeps brushing their thumb against my skin. That is excruciatingly painful, but I feel bad for having to make a big deal about it.

      It's never been anything that severely affects my ability to live life, I just have to do things a little differently sometimes. And I get a little sick of hearing things like "WELL YOU WOULDN'T GET BLISTERS ON YOUR FEET IF YOU WORE SOCKS!!!"
      Oh wow, I'm so glad to be reading this thread. You have just described my four year old son. I have spent $$$$ on socks as they always have 'lumps' or someting else. There are loads of things he won't touch and loud noises have him in pieces. I never even knew about this. Am off to Google now to check it out. I took him to he Paed who just said he was very mildly on the Autism spectrum - which I disagree with, he isn't at all. Thanks for sharing this.

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      • #33
        Oh, and as for his sense of smell....he smells things from 3 rooms away. My husband and I call him 'Senses Boy', I guess we were more right than we imagined. Have just read the whole thread, I think it does interfere with his life because there are some things he won't eat because he can't stand them to touch his hands or face and has to use a fork or spoon (he hates sticky, at first I thought it was an OCD thing). He'll cry if his brother has a poo in his nappy and sob until it's been changed. He spends a lot of time with his hands over his ears to stop loud noises (he begs me never to use the dryers in public toilets) and the thing with socks drives me nuts. I'd never put all of this into one picture of sensory overload. I'm quite blown away by reading all this.

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        • #34
          Hi Dexy, I'm super glad if my posts could help you!

          As far as socks go, I recommend the thinnest, silkiest dress socks you can find (might be hard to find for little kids), or nylon footies. In all cases, make sure the seam rests ABOVE the toes, as the tops of the toes are much less sensitive than the bottoms or tips. The absolute worst for me are white, thick athletic socks. Just thinking about them makes me cringe.

          My mom always used to get frustrated about my sock thing too. And then, later on, I stopped wearing underpants too. It's been almost 15 years and I still won't wear them. She just rolls her eyes and shakes her head at this point. All I can say is, imagine having burrs in your socks all the time, or a scratchy plastic seam that pokes you and rakes against your tender flesh all day long. It can be hard to focus on anything else because it is painful and constant, like stubbing your toe with every step you take. You become consumed with rage because all you want to do is rip your shoes and socks off. So, try not to be too frustrated if he won't keep his socks on. He's more than likely not doing it to be bad, it's just painful, and he probably doesn't understand why you would want to do something to him that's painful.

          Also remember that, even though he is sensitive to unpleasant stimuli, he's also sensitive to pleasant ones! Try and find a scent he particularly likes and try to have a cloth/blanket/stuffed animal around that smells like that. (I used to have a little bunny pillow filled with lavender that I slept with. I also had an "addiction" to Dryel sheets at one point. The smell of those things is almost orgasmic, I'm not kidding.) Then if he is feeling overwhelmed by a bad smell, he can go hide under some blankets and "huff" the good smell and calm down. That always made me feel better.
          Last edited by Gravyboat; 07-08-2012, 08:26 AM.

          _-J o u r n a l_--------- ---- ---- --- --- -- -- -

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          • #35
            butter is your friend.

            eta: wow, i just read through. have never heard of this disorder. what a terrible challenge.

            i have a very sensitive sense of smell and often detect aromas and odors others do not, but it's not debilitating. although i have some pretty serious reactions to ladies in terrible perfume.

            Last edited by noodletoy; 07-08-2012, 10:07 AM.
            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

            Ernest Hemingway

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            • #36
              Sbhikes Its through no fault of my own. As I maintain I have very little control over what my brain accepts and rejects. I just thought Id post something asking for some advice on what I could do to improve the situation. To be frank I dont understand why I can hardly eat anything but I assure you it isnt a choice. If you have no understanding of the subject then dont put anything. This post isnt from a "crybaby" just from someone needing a bit of guidence however comments like yours do not help...

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              • #37
                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                Yeah, I was interpreting the original post as being like my niece who I have never seen eat anything except spaghetti-ohs and white bread. I don't think she has ever eaten anything else. I just don't understand how that happens (well obviously, it's parenting), but more than that, why doesn't it clear up on its own?
                sbhikes if I understood why my problem doesn't just clear up on its own then id be happy but for some people problems like mine don't seem to just fade away as we enter adulthood. Please try and be more understanding.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                  More information, please, Mr. James.

                  What DOES go down the hatch?
                  What have you tried that was spat out, and how was it prepared?

                  If you give us details, we can work better with that... hope to hear.
                  I'd be happy to. Well the only things that seem to "go down the hatch" for me is broccoli and cauliflower and I 'm quite lucky to like those. Other than those two vegetables I really can't eat any others. It's not really down to how they are cooked, more of what they are. Ill give you a list of a few of the things I can't consume. spinach, general salad leaves, kale, sweetcorn, onion, leek, peas, sprouts, tomato's, cabbage, lettuce... The list go's on. I also hate butter and dislike most herbs and spices. Its the texture for some and taste for others but I have tried some of them but just can't hold any of them down. And let me reiterate the fact that it is not a choice and that my problem didn't fade away when I became an adult. It also cause's problems for me when i'm going out for food. I can't go for Chinese food for example because I can't hold down anything on the menu and don't like the strong flavours. My parents are very kind and supportive but even they can't do much about it. And I really do try to eat foods that I dislike but have great difficulty chewing them and even more so holding them down. I've struggled with trying new foods pretty much all my life but now I really want to change but it doesn't seem to be happening. I hope this was detailed enough for you.
                  Last edited by James B; 07-10-2012, 04:11 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by James B View Post
                    I'd be happy to. Well the only things that seem to "go down the hatch" for me is broccoli and cauliflower and I 'm quite lucky to like those. Other than those two vegetables I really can't eat any others. It's not really down to how they are cooked, more of what are. Ill give you a list of a few of the things I can't consume. spinach, general salad leaves, kale, sweetcorn, onion, leek, peas, sprouts, tomato's, cabbage, lettuce... The list go's on. I also hate butter and dislike most herbs and spices. Its the texture for some and taste for others but I have tried some of them but just can't hold any of them down. And let me reiterate the fact that it is not a choice and that my problem didn't fade away when I became an adult. It also cause's problems for me when i'm going out for food. I can't go for Chinese food for example because I can't hold down anything on the menu and don't like the strong flavours. My parents are very kind and supportive but even they can't do much about it. And I really do try to eat foods that I dislike but have great difficulty chewing them and even more so holding them down. I've struggled with trying new foods pretty much all my life but now I really want to change but it doesn't seem to be happening. I hope this was detailed enough for you.
                    Are you able to eat fatty meats? Fish? Aside from butter, is dairy tolerable for you in both a digestive and sensory sense? Avocados? Coconut? You gotta have something to go with all that broccoli and cauliflower.
                    The Champagne of Beards

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                    • #40
                      Hey James - I'm back.

                      I think you know I am going to say this, but I think you should contact an occupational therapist, or a feeding specialist / eating disorders specialist at your local hospital. Over here, I can call the pediatric section just to ask for the proper name or title of the department in the hospital / clinic that would treat adult eating disorders.

                      I see good things in your future - you have the intellectual knowledge, and the will. Those are the two biggest requisites for a positive outcome in both kids and big people.

                      In the meantime, please get the book from Amazon called "Food Chaining" by Cheryl Fraker. This book takes food-averse kids right where they are and makes one small change to their food at a time until they arrive at a better place. Kind of like that game where you start with a word like S T O P and change it over 6 steps to make P A T H. You might find one thing you could try whilst you are gathering info.

                      It is good to hear that your folks are gentle on you. It took me a while to find the docs who could help us - these kids DO NOT come with instruction manuals for their special issues, or even a LABEL stuck to their rears telling us that our particular kid needs different handling - that would have been so nice. I still tear up over the suffering daughter and I went through before we found help, even though it was neither overly long nor abusive.

                      Don't be hard on sbhikes - I know you are serious now, but when I first read your post, I, too, thought it was from one of those crybaby posters with more excuses than brains... (and I secretly appreciated sbhikes for saying it)... I'm really sorry . This perhaps may be a somewhat cultural problem with we Americans - there are honestly waaaaay too many kids here with functioning taste buds and brains who have been raised on shit... and it bothers even me to see them as kids-menu-eating adults.
                      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                        Are you able to eat fatty meats? Fish? Aside from butter, is dairy tolerable for you in both a digestive and sensory sense? Avocados? Coconut? You gotta have something to go with all that broccoli and cauliflower.
                        Oh yes i'm able to eat things like oily fish and meats. I don't really have a problem with those. And yes i'm fine with milk and cheese and cream and such, just butter I don't like.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by James B
                          Oh yes i'm able to eat things like oily fish and meats. I don't really have a problem with those. And yes i'm fine with milk and cheese and cream and such, just butter I don't like.
                          Doesn't really sound like you have a problem. Nobody says you have to eat every vegetable in the produce aisle. Maybe take a multivitamin for now (unless, of course you find nature's multivitamin a/k/a liver to be tolerable) and I bet your taste buds will change over time. Unless you have a serious neuro- issue going on, in which case they might not. I still think you have plenty of variety and nutrition available within your current parameters.
                          The Champagne of Beards

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by James B View Post
                            I'd be happy to. Well the only things that seem to "go down the hatch" for me is broccoli and cauliflower and I 'm quite lucky to like those. Other than those two vegetables I really can't eat any others. It's not really down to how they are cooked, more of what are. Ill give you a list of a few of the things I can't consume. spinach, general salad leaves, kale, sweetcorn, onion, leek, peas, sprouts, tomato's, cabbage, lettuce... The list go's on. I also hate butter and dislike most herbs and spices. Its the texture for some and taste for others but I have tried some of them but just can't hold any of them down. And let me reiterate the fact that it is not a choice and that my problem didn't fade away when I became an adult. It also cause's problems for me when i'm going out for food. I can't go for Chinese food for example because I can't hold down anything on the menu and don't like the strong flavours. My parents are very kind and supportive but even they can't do much about it. And I really do try to eat foods that I dislike but have great difficulty chewing them and even more so holding them down. I've struggled with trying new foods pretty much all my life but now I really want to change but it doesn't seem to be happening. I hope this was detailed enough for you.
                            Also look into the possibility that you may be a supertaster. Being able to eat broccoli and cauliflower would be a bit odd for one, but most everything else you mention would make sense.
                            Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                              Doesn't really sound like you have a problem. Nobody says you have to eat every vegetable in the produce aisle. Maybe take a multivitamin for now (unless, of course you find nature's multivitamin a/k/a liver to be tolerable) and I bet your taste buds will change over time. Unless you have a serious neuro- issue going on, in which case they might not. I still think you have plenty of variety and nutrition available within your current parameters.
                              Well I suppose I could get some of my vitamins from supplements and I know I wont be able to just eat everything in 1 day but i'd rather have a proper diet because I've spent a lot of time being unsatisfied with my current diet. And no I wouldn't call it a serious issue but it is a big problem for me.
                              Last edited by James B; 07-10-2012, 04:08 PM.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Blackcatbone View Post
                                Also look into the possibility that you may be a supertaster. Being able to eat broccoli and cauliflower would be a bit odd for one, but most everything else you mention would make sense.
                                Yes frankly I count myself lucky I can eat those 2 vegetables. And what would be a supertaster exactly?

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