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Feel like I should be bigger and stronger. like Grok!

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  • Feel like I should be bigger and stronger. like Grok!

    Been thinking why some of us hard gainers are the way we are. Why is it that we're generally smaller and can't pack on any extra weight? I thought it might have something to do with the food we had growing up, or our mom's diet during pregnancy. Remember one of Mark's posts about humans getting smaller and frailer as grains were bought into the diet, and I wonder if this is the main reason. I don't think that I reached my full potential growth and I'm 24 now so there's not much that can be done I guess. I'm 5'9" and 52 kilo's, so quite underweight for a guy. Just thought I'd start a thread and ask if there are any other reasons why we didn't reach our full potential growing up. If I had a kid I'd like them to get the most out of their genes and I suspect if they were raised primally they'd probably be healthier and stronger than their dad. So what's your take on this. Would many smaller folk have been bigger adults if they were growing up on a primal diet?
    Last edited by randallfloyd; 07-06-2012, 12:21 PM.

  • #2
    Even before I knew about PB and Paleo, I knew on an instinct level that all the horrible food my parents fed me as a kid and adolescent made me short.

    I am 5'2". Mom - 5'7", Dad - 5'10"

    My great depression-era grandparents were somewhat shorter (5'4", 5'4", 5'8", 5'10), but again, diet.

    Two of of great-grandparents were over 6' tall. The rest I do not know about.

    The only thing ever wanted to be as a kid was tall. Reasonably, I think I should have made it to 5'5" at least!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by parrottrl View Post
      Even before I knew about PB and Paleo, I knew on an instinct level that all the horrible food my parents fed me as a kid and adolescent made me short.

      I am 5'2". Mom - 5'7", Dad - 5'10"

      My great depression-era grandparents were somewhat shorter (5'4", 5'4", 5'8", 5'10), but again, diet.

      Two of of great-grandparents were over 6' tall. The rest I do not know about.

      The only thing ever wanted to be as a kid was tall. Reasonably, I think I should have made it to 5'5" at least!
      Yeah it's a bummer, especially if you're a guy. Not so bad if you're a girl. I never got any vitamin D growing up either think that may have contributed - was teased for being skinny through school so always used to cover up my arms, even on a hot summer day! Wish I hadn't let it get to me now. Pretty sure D is among the most vital things for a young growing human. Doesn't bother me to that extent now, but would still like to fill out somewhat, and reach average weight.

      I am a fat burner though and that's awesome, just completed a first 20 hour fast with a workout

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      • #4
        Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
        Been thinking why some of us hard gainers are the way we are. Why is it that we're generally smaller and can't pack on any extra weight? I thought it might have something to do with the food we had growing up, or our mom's diet during pregnancy. Remember one of Mark's posts about humans getting smaller and frailer as grains were bought into the diet, and I wonder if this is the main reason. I don't think that I reached my full potential growth and I'm 24 now so there's not much that can be done I guess. I'm 5'9" and 52 kilo's, so quite underweight for a guy. Just thought I'd start a thread and ask if there are any other reasons why we didn't reach our full potential growing up. If I had a kid I'd like them to get the most out of their genes and I suspect if they were raised primally they'd probably be healthier and stronger than their dad. So what's your take on this. Would many smaller folk have been bigger adults if they were growing up on a primal diet?
        Be happy you are a hard-gainer- it's a much easier fix than the other end of the spectrum. Just eat plenty(i.e. way more than you think you even can) and lift properly(SS or something similiar)- anyone can pack on 20lbs of muscle in a few months this way. (I train hard-gainers as part of my job.)
        Lifting Journal

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        • #5
          Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
          Yeah it's a bummer, especially if you're a guy. Not so bad if you're a girl.
          I really have to disagree. At work, I have to fetch a step stool 15 - 20 times a day just to reach things my coworkers can grab something off a shelf without even stretching their arms all the way! One of our customers made fun of me just this week when he saw me carrying one. The embarrassment didn't stop when school let out, at least not for me. Shortness is universally painful, IMHO.

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          • #6
            Parrottrl, I apologize for the gross generalization. Falling into the error of stereotyping there
            Sorry to hear it's a pain for you.

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            • #7
              I was a weak and skinny guy in my early years (always picked last, etc.) then turned into a weak and fat guy, so gaining muscle was a real struggle for me - but lifting free weights,following a real training program seriously, and eating more than I ever wanted to, every day, I managed to get my lifts up to not-embarrassing levels and have some muscle to show for it. I went from 7 pushups, max, to a 355 deadlift (dunno how many pushups, more than 7!) and still working on it. You can do it.
              If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                Be happy you are a hard-gainer- it's a much easier fix than the other end of the spectrum.
                Yes and no. Some of the success stories on here are incredible where people have been able to drop 100lbs and end up really ripped and strong, and to keep hold of that physique they lift here and there, fast, and eat primal. The potential was always there - eat right and it just happens for them. The hard gainer doesn't have that potential to gain muscle and strength like that. I could gain a couple of pounds through through intense, structured workouts and by eating 'til I burst, but I don't do it because it's not natural or sustainable. If the SAD diet were the only diet, then yeh, the hard gainer is blessed. The hard gainer who wants natural gain, however, can't get it through any means.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                  I was a weak and skinny guy in my early years (always picked last, etc.) then turned into a weak and fat guy, so gaining muscle was a real struggle for me - but lifting free weights,following a real training program seriously, and eating more than I ever wanted to, every day, I managed to get my lifts up to not-embarrassing levels and have some muscle to show for it. I went from 7 pushups, max, to a 355 deadlift (dunno how many pushups, more than 7!) and still working on it. You can do it.
                  Cool success story. Do you have to limit your workouts though. i.e. making sure not to do too much exercise, in order to hold the weight on?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
                    Yes and no. Some of the success stories on here are incredible where people have been able to drop 100lbs and end up really ripped and strong, and to keep hold of that physique they lift here and there, fast, and eat primal. The potential was always there - eat right and it just happens for them. The hard gainer doesn't have that potential to gain muscle and strength like that. I could gain a couple of pounds through through intense, structured workouts and by eating 'til I burst, but I don't do it because it's not natural or sustainable. If the SAD diet were the only diet, then yeh, the hard gainer is blessed. The hard gainer who wants natural gain, however, can't get it through any means.
                    As someone who watches these things all day, the success ratio for hardgainers adding muscle is much higher than people who lose much weight or become ripped. Really, if you do the proper program as a hardgainer, you will get hungry and want to eat the amount of food that it takes. It's a natural process. It's incredibly straight forward compared to either reversing obesity or getting ripped. All my "hardgainer" clients have a walk in the park compared to the rest. It's usually 6-12 weeks of work(or just 36 workouts!), depending on compliance, then maintenance. It's predictable, and the variables are very few. It's never that easy for any of my other clients- even the best complying and most straightforward ones who are trying to reverse obesity need 6-12 months.
                    Lifting Journal

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                      As someone who watches these things all day, the success ratio for hardgainers adding muscle is much higher than people who lose much weight or become ripped. Really, if you do the proper program as a hardgainer, you will get hungry and want to eat the amount of food that it takes. It's a natural process. It's incredibly straight forward compared to either reversing obesity or getting ripped. All my "hardgainer" clients have a walk in the park compared to the rest. It's usually 6-12 weeks of work(or just 36 workouts!), depending on compliance, then maintenance. It's predictable, and the variables are very few. It's never that easy for any of my other clients- even the best complying and most straightforward ones who are trying to reverse obesity need 6-12 months.
                      Well, I wouldn't say it was "easy" for me at all and I've still got a ways to go - I've decided I need a 2xbw dl and some other stuff - but overall I'd agree with you. It certainly is "natural" to lift heavy weights, get hungry, and eat a horse, and it does indeed produce results.
                      If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
                        Cool success story. Do you have to limit your workouts though. i.e. making sure not to do too much exercise, in order to hold the weight on?
                        I'm not sure what you mean - certainly if I workout too much I don't recover and I feel a deep fatigue. I know enough now about how it works that skipping a day and coming back fresh the next day is sometimes a good idea. But your ability to handle volume and intensity also increases with workouts - your body is more adaptable than you might think, given the appropriate stimulus. I'm currently training for a tough mudder and trying to add conditioning and lose a bit of the extra fat I gained while weight training, and it's so interesting how quickly the cardio comes to you when you have a base of strength.
                        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                          Well, I wouldn't say it was "easy" for me at all and I've still got a ways to go - I've decided I need a 2xbw dl and some other stuff - but overall I'd agree with you. It certainly is "natural" to lift heavy weights, get hungry, and eat a horse, and it does indeed produce results.
                          Well, I was saying it's easy compared to reversing obesity in someone with a broken metabolism, or even going from lean to shredded. There are less factors, and the adherence doesn't need to be as strict. I have yet to see someone fail to respond to regimented LHT and plenty of food. I have seen people not respond(or respond minimally) to straightforward programs for the issues listed above.
                          Lifting Journal

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Apex Predator View Post
                            Well, I was saying it's easy compared to reversing obesity in someone with a broken metabolism, or even going from lean to shredded. There are less factors, and the adherence doesn't need to be as strict. I have yet to see someone fail to respond to regimented LHT and plenty of food. I have seen people not respond(or respond minimally) to straightforward programs for the issues listed above.
                            Fair enough, and well said.
                            If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
                              Been thinking why some of us hard gainers are the way we are. Why is it that we're generally smaller and can't pack on any extra weight? ....I don't think that I reached my full potential growth and I'm 24 now so there's not much that can be done I guess. I'm 5'9" and 52 kilo's, so quite underweight for a guy. Just thought I'd start a thread and ask if there are any other reasons why we didn't reach our full potential growing up. ...So what's your take on this. Would many smaller folk have been bigger adults if they were growing up on a primal diet?
                              Growing up, I was always skinny but very athletic w/ a high metabolism, always outdoors after school & during summer. I ate ALOT, maybe 5 full meals a day & snacks too. It was really REALLY a lot of effort to put on & then to keep any new muscle gains when I was in my teens & 20s. It was a lot of work & if I stopped paying attention, I would slim down again pretty quickly. When I hit my 30s finally I could put on muscle & could keep it on more much easily. Now in my 40s & looking back, I can say it was my fat burning metabolism of being young, & my high athletic activity level that made the difference. So stay vigilant, keep lifting & eating meat & avoiding all or most grains & excess carbs.
                              "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
                              "Culture of the mind must be subservient to the heart." ~ Gandhi
                              "The flogging will continue until morale improves." ~ Unknown

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