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  • Organic Gardening



    Does anyone have experience with organic vegetable gardening? There is a lack of organic veggies where I live and I get strange looks from some people who have never heard of organic. So I thought I would just grow my own greens and primal veggies. With 100 acres out my back door why not.


  • #2
    1



    I do it every year. In New York City. I like this book: http://www.amazon.com/New-Organic-Gr...8846029&sr=1-7

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    • #3
      1



      I will be doing it this year. So far, it looks like organic gardening is almost as easy but far more enjoyable as conventional way.

      I picked up two great books from Amazon about organic gardening in northern climates and it's been really helpful.

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      • #4
        1



        Yes, anything by Elliot Coleman is great.


        He and his partner (wife?) had a TV special on PBS that was very good. I still have all the episodes on VHS somewhere haha!

        Don't be a paleotard...

        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

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        • #5
          1



          Oh, it's easy! I grew up on organic veggies; didn't even realize it because my parents were just growing a garden on their six acres. The hard part is all the canning goodies!


          Honestly, you can follow any book on gardening that's out there - just don't put any fertilizer on the plants!

          And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
          Kahlil Gibran

          http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

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          • #6
            1



            Start a compost pile!

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            • #7
              1



              ...and let mulch do 80% of the weeding and 50% of the watering!

              Don't be a paleotard...

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

              Comment


              • #8
                1



                Experience with OG? Intensely so ca. 1972 when not a soul knew what OG was, and OG magazine was a little one.


                There is huge amounts of info out there. Hit the library and the internets.

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                • #9
                  1



                  I adore books by Eliot Coleman. What a neat guy! Grows fresh produce for restaurants 12 months a year in MAINE without supplemental heat!


                  He also put me onto the European-style scythe, which is a lot of fun and easy to use.


                  My favorite garden book, which has been the most useful and the most fun both, is "Gaia's Garden" by Toby Hemenway.


                  Highly recommended. So far if I do things his way, they work just fine.

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                  • #10
                    1



                    I have gardened organically off and on over the years. Growing food is endlessly interesting. Always something new to try be it a new plant or method.


                    It is good to remember, just because something doesn't do well one year, doesn't mean it won't do well the next year. I remember my eggplants did poorly two years in a row, then the next year became the year of the eggplant. I had so many of them I even resorted to making eggplant cake. Was pretty good as I remember. I think I converted an applesauce cake recipe. All pre-primal you understand.


                    It is also recommended to start small unless you have lots of dependable willing hands.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      Thanks for all the great tips and advice. I will get those books that you mentioned. Eggplant was one of the things I was considering planting so I will let you know how it goes. I am planning on starting small. Maybe only about 7 or 8 different items and a patch about 12 x 12. We'll see how it goes.

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                      • #12
                        1



                        I'd recommend doing raised beds if you don't have them already. It's super easy to build up a great soil that way. I raise veggies in my backyard and it always amazes me when I pass by the local allotments how much work people seem to be doing. All that shoveling and hoeing. I'm way too lazy for all that! :-) Raised beds are much less work once you've got the up.


                        Just put down a ton of well-rotted manure and use lots of mulch (I use strulch, which is a type of straw mulch). I also highly recommend growing any greens under hoops topped with a light fleece or netting because that'll keep out the vast majority of pests. If you're just starting out, it can be helpful to buy seedlings, rather than seeds because some seeds can be finicky. There's lots of places you can order online.


                        Oh and have a look at square foot gardening. I use those basic principles for intensive gardening. Just be aware that many of the things you'll read are just based on anecdotal evidence and are mostly hogwash. Most companion planting advice, making manure tea, planting by the moon cycles - a waste of time. As for pests it's good to encourage ladybirds in your yard, but they're not going to eat all your aphids. Trust me! :-) Grow things under netting and you'll only have to worry about slugs. Much less work.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          12x12?


                          Then may I suggest Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew.


                          This one is very good as well but maybe better for next season:


                          How to Grow More Vegetables: Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Can Imagine

                          Don't be a paleotard...

                          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

                          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

                          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

                          http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1



                            I have a ladybug-aphid saga ...


                            Sometimes good things come of benign neglect.


                            Always aphids on the roses, I'm organic. I'd pull them off, smash them with my bare hands, spray them off with the hose nozzle, sometimes squirt Safer's Insecticidal Soap on them. They'd be better, but they'd always be back.


                            Then one year at my old rental place, I planted a hops vine. It grew like mad! In fact, it grew so well I had to dig it out after the first year because it was up in the eaves and roof. And I delayed picking them after they were ready (just busy) and when I went to pick them they were full of aphids. :-(


                            New place, bought this time, I planted the roses, they had the aphids, I did the same things, business as usual. And I planted a hops vine, but picked them sooner. Then my knees went bad, and the garden barely got water in the summer, let alone anything else. Of course the roses were covered with aphids, I didn't kill a one. And the hops waited too long again. I went out to pick them, expecting aphids all over them .............


                            ................................(are you ready for this?)


                            Not a single aphid, but I saw four ladybugs. And looking at the roses, no aphids there either.


                            For ladybugs, plant some alternate food sources for the rest of the season, which can keep them fed and their numbers high all year round. And don't kill the aphids before they can be eaten.

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                            • #15
                              1



                              I've got masses of ladybirds in my yard and they breed like crazy (lots of babies around - they look like aliens). I've also got massive amounts of aphids. A natural population isn't going to eat all of their prey; then they would go extinct! I wish I could say that encouraging ladybirds helps with aphids, but in my experience aphids are still a problem. :-(

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