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I ate A LOT today, best way to battle?

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  • #16
    >>>And I'd say that for the guys, its a little more common to tilt towards the "I can eat a ton of fat and never get fat so long as I avoid carbs"... where as you tend to see quite a few women who end up also having to count calories.<<<

    I'm the same way, Magnolia. I did "unweighed unmeasured Paleo" for a few months eating a lot of fat and VLC and actually gained. Through a LOT of experimentation and careful recording, I've found that I can lose slow and steadily at about 1500 calories a day and about 100g of carbs. Of course, I never had a lot to lose to begin with, and I'm now about 10 pounds away from my goal (I think, but my BF % will be the true determinant there).

    I don't think a "calorie is a calorie", however. I can't imagine being satiated or having the energy I do on a 1500 calorie a day high carb diet. But 1500 calories with plenty of good fats and protein? Very doable, and enough to sustain a slow fat loss.
    "For the great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived, and dishonest—but the myth—persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic ... we enjoy the comfort of opinions without the discomfort of thought."
    ---John F. Kennedy

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    • #17
      To second Magnolia about the 'value' of CICO--consider this. Taubes is writing the equivalent of a medical textbook analysis. His is 'correct' for the 'average person.' Someone like me who was morbidly obese from early childhood and at 5'4" was eventually over 300 lbs is not the 'average person'--but common among the obese.

      I've read that people like us almost universally have some metabolic dysfunction, and since I've become hypothyroid, my endo has confirmed this. Thus, I cannot eat over 25g of carbs without gaining weight--even if those carbs are all green vegetables. I can also gain weight at that carb level if I eat over my caloric level--which I had to arrive at by trial and error because all the 'calculations' are for 'average people.' No matter the level of carbs, the body doesn't release its own fat without a caloric deficit that requires it to do so. The body is programmed to maintain itself, even its very obese self.

      By learning what would work for my particular body, I was able to lose close to 200 lbs (340 - 146) despite being both post-menopausal and hypothyroid, two conditions that work against weight loss.

      Yes, Taubes is correct--within a certain context, and CICO may seem reductive, but don't ever be fooled--calories always count.

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      • #18
        Magnolia- If you are gaining on 2000, there is definitely something else going on hormonally. I too used to gain in a maintaining amount (yes, 2000 should be a maintain amount). The larger you are, the more calories you need to sustain that weight. The smaller you are, the less you need etc. (that is if you believe in CICO, which it seems that you do.) If that were true, then why wouldn't you be able to eat 2000 without gaining regardless of macros?
        I see that you said you were on a low fat diet for years. Maybe it is possible that it lowered your energy expenditure? I saw that Mark posted a study done on different diets and low fat had the worst effect on energy expenditure. Which makes sense because the body probably though it was in famine, being that there is only carbs and very little fat (which is essential).
        I maintain on 2000-2500 usually. I am 5'2 110 pounds. Some days I eat 3000 and it really doesn't affect me much as long as I go back to 2000-2500. The days I eat 3000 are usually not primal, and the macros are mixed. I don't do heavy cardio AT ALL. I do lift weights but I am not a fanatic.

        I am not trying to sound like a know it all or tell you what to do. But I know how it feels to feel the need to keep lowering the calories to prevent weight gain. That sucks. I just don't think gaining on 2000 sounds reasonable.

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        • #19
          A likely explanation of Magnolia's experience with needing to eat less than one might expect for maintenance:

          Why is it so Hard to Maintain a Reduced Body Weight? | Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes
          “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

          Owly's Journal

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          • #20
            Eat when you're hungry, don't when you're not.

            Were you hungry when you ate all that food? If not, why did you eat it? If you were, then you were listening to your body and giving it what it needed that day. Don't eat again until you're truly hungry. It all balances out.
            Sandra
            *My obligatory intro

            There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

            DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

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            • #21
              Originally posted by emmie View Post
              I've read that people like us almost universally have some metabolic dysfunction, and since I've become hypothyroid, my endo has confirmed this. Thus, I cannot eat over 25g of carbs without gaining weight--even if those carbs are all green vegetables. I can also gain weight at that carb level if I eat over my caloric level--which I had to arrive at by trial and error because all the 'calculations' are for 'average people.' No matter the level of carbs, the body doesn't release its own fat without a caloric deficit that requires it to do so.

              By learning what would work for my particular body, I was able to lose close to 200 lbs (340 - 146) despite being both post-menopausal and hypothyroid, two conditions that work against weight loss.

              Yes, Taubes is correct--within a certain context, and CICO may seem reductive, but don't ever be fooled--calories always count.
              First of all, well done on the weight loss. Yes, calories count and yes, Taubes was right. It doesn't have to be either/or it is both.

              Originally posted by Sandra in BC View Post
              Eat when you're hungry, don't when you're not.

              Were you hungry when you ate all that food? If not, why did you eat it? If you were, then you were listening to your body and giving it what it needed that day. Don't eat again until you're truly hungry. It all balances out.
              I call BS on this. Sorry, but these platitudes work great for someone with a normally functioning metabolism that is not far from a healthy weight. You can't "listen to your body" when it is telling you lies or is so confused it doesn't know what it is saying.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                I call BS on this. Sorry, but these platitudes work great for someone with a normally functioning metabolism that is not far from a healthy weight. You can't "listen to your body" when it is telling you lies or is so confused it doesn't know what it is saying.
                I was responding to the OP. She pigged out for a day and wants suggestions for damage control. She never specified WHY she overate. There's no indication from her posts that her metabolism isn't functioning normally, and she's not obese. And yes, for some people listening to their body IS that simple. Not easy, just simple. They've just never done it before.
                Sandra
                *My obligatory intro

                There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

                DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

                Comment


                • #23
                  Wow, this went all over I think CICO can be important, I think that if I ate that many calories (and I realized later that wasn't even it, I forgot a side dish of veggies and butter) every day for a long time and really didn't do any exercise that I would most definitely gain weight, regardless of how clean I was eating, even if I took out the dairy and was getting all those calories through coconut oil, etc. I also think CICO on a day to day basis isn't that important, I try to look at weekly averages over day to day numbers anyway. My weekly average won't be nearly that high as I usually have at least a couple really busy days where I work and have to do other things and am lucky to get in 1200-1500 calories that day, so I usually average around 1500-1800 most of the time I would say.

                  I also think paleotrack might have some issues, I didn't do it yet, but I think I might enter the stuff into myfitnesspal to see what it says. I actually didn't even feel like I overate at all, I was actually quite surprised to see numbers that high. I figured that it was the drinkable calories though (bulletproof coffee, etc.) that drove it up so high even though I didn't feel like I overate. Now, I ate GOOD, I full and warmly satisfied at the end of the day, but I didn't feel out of sorts. I have two meals (lunch+dinner) and the coffee stuff was in the morning. Lunch was baked seasoned salmon (abt 7 or 8 oz) with a small bowl of salad (evoo+vinegar), some sweet peas with butter, and a bowl of mixed fruit (mango/banana/blueberries) and dinner was probably about 3/4 lb of baked seasoned chicken (with skin), 1/2 small eggplant w/ evoo (roasted), about 8 asparagus spears (in butter), and two small pears baked in a butter sauce. Other than that stuff just butter and whipping cream in coffee.

                  I have also read a lot of things about women not being able to get quite as free with the fat and seeing similar (lean) results, and I can imagine that could be the case for a lot of women, myself included. I lost a lot more weight back when I did Atkins and fat was ok but I wasn't gulping it down by the cup. I'm pretty sure the fact that women can have babies and men can't might have something to do with this, it makes sense to me that a woman's body wouldn't lean out as much eating this way because women's bodies are supposed to be prepared to house another life and holding on to some extra fluff is probably beneficial for that.

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                  • #24
                    I have found as time has gone on that it's not worth worrying about a day of way overeating. Like the time I ate and entire half a duck. I woke up the next morning, after tossing and turning and burning up with horrendous night sweats, so NOT hungry I skipped breakfast and went for a hike up a mountain. I skipped lunch, too. I felt amazing, like the half a duck actually did something good to me. Lately, I've been way overeating almost every day. Oddly there has been no weight gain at all. Instead, I've had more energy for my workouts and started riding my bike to work. Not as punishment but because I just feel good and want to do it.

                    So my advice is don't worry so much. Get back on track the next day. In the end, it probably won't hurt at all. Daily overeating of candy, cookies, pie and chips will hurt, but overeating on paleo food won't hurt once in a while. It'll probably do you good.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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