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  • Bike Seat Damage

    I read that bike seats cause damage to private parts.

    I ride a stationary bike for my sprints and sometimes up to half an hour for my low intensity aerobics.

    So far no problems but am I slowly damaging myself? Must I ditch my bike?

  • #2
    They make bike seats that have a split down the middle so as not to press on the family jewels. There are also seats that are wider and so keep most of the weight distributed more evenly.

    The kind of seat that causes problems is the really narrow hard saddles used by some serious cyclists. They also are on those saddles a lot more hours than you are.

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    • #3
      The family jewels are usually not the problem, it's the base of the "primary" organ that runs all the way through that area. If you keep the pressure off your organ, you're fine. I just ride standing.
      Crohn's, doing SCD

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      • #4
        "Family jewels " was just my euphemism for all those gentleman bits that I don't have collectively. I'm glad someone who does have those bits chimed in.

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        • #5
          Biggest mistake people make is thinking softer is better. A proper saddle should support your "sit bones" so your privates are elevated. Soft and cushy allows pressure on your privates. I've been riding, on average, 5k miles a year for the past fifteen years or so....no issues with me plumbing.

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          • #6
            ^What he said. You could probably swap for a different seat if it's uncomfortable. That being said, some men are just not designed to handle it. I happen to be dating someone that cannot, for the life of them, adjust in any way that makes a bicycle seat not incredibly painful.
            Depression Lies

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mikebike View Post
              Biggest mistake people make is thinking softer is better. A proper saddle should support your "sit bones" so your privates are elevated. Soft and cushy allows pressure on your privates. I've been riding, on average, 5k miles a year for the past fifteen years or so....no issues with me plumbing.
              +1
              Free your mind, and your Grok will follow!

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              • #8
                They make seats with a hole in the middle for those female jewels, too.
                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                • #9
                  For women, I highly recommend the Terry Liberator. Gets rave reviews from the gals in my cycle club.

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                  • #10
                    I don't ride stationary, just to the subway (about 2 miles one way) and to work (about 11 miles one way). I ride all the way to work 2-3 days per week and to the subway other days. So I do a lot of riding. I swear by the English leather saddles from Brooks, in particular the sprung ones. I have a wide sprung one (B67) on one of my bikes and a narrower one (Champion Flyer) on the other. I totally agree softer is not better.

                    What I have found from thousands of miles of riding (almost 10,000 miles in 5 years now) is that you really need to experiment to dial in your fit. Over time seat posts sag a bit which can impact fit as well. Literally a half inch down on your seat post or a slight tilt on your saddle can matter a lot for comfort. Also, sometimes my bike shorts bunch up and can be uncomfortable. In short, experiment a lot and find what works for you. Sometimes, no matter what I do, I cannot get comfortable. Other times, I feel like I could ride for hours in bliss. Also, sometimes a very short break, like 2 minutes can do wonders for your parts as well. Good luck.

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                    • #11
                      I bought a new bike a couple of years ago and the seat on it was wrong. I went in to the shop to buy a different seat and for some reason I could not find a good way to explain to the bike mechanic what the issue was. He grudgingly agreed to swap it for one with the groove down the middle, and lo! the problem was over. Much later a reasonable phrase came to mind: "It's putting my crotch to sleep!" For the life of me I couldn't think how to explain it at the time without feeling awkward.
                      "Wait! I'll fix it!"
                      "Problems always disappear in the presence of a technician."
                      "If you can't improvise, what are you doing out in the field?"

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                      • #12
                        I did loads of Mountainbiking before I met the Mrs, all day rides on weekends, couple of short rides in the week, now I have 2 kids, concieved first time of trying for each one, so no probs with my man meat's functionality
                        You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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                        • #13
                          Sometimes the problem can be resolved or prevented by careful adjustment of seat angle. I know this by negative experience - I went on a metric century one weekend after switching to Scott DH bars. I neglected to adjust the angle of the seat a little bit downwards to compensate for the greater forward lean. I had no feeling in the bits until sometime the following Thursday. Scary sruff.

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