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Are you paranoid you'll get cancer?

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  • #16
    Please don't think I'm crazy (I'm not, my mom had me tested) but I don't fear dying because I've actually heard from the dead, and even tho I don't want it to happen soon, I look forward to seeing them again, most especially my dad.

    The women on both sides of my fam live to nearly 100, my paternal grandmother died in her sleep 2 wks before her 105th bday, so when my sister developed a glioma brain tumor at 63 yrs old, no one could believe it. She always kept herself a size 8, walked, ate high quality food, was wealthy but drank vodka like it was water.

    Brain surgeon told me sugar will feed a tumor like nothing else, as my sister sat there and had Hershey kisses lined up on the arm of her wheelchair, but she knew it was too late to do anything at that point, lived almost a yr after diagnosis. My 87 yr old mom will never get over it, but I convinced her to make her peace with it unless she desired to leave this earth. Besides, she knows where her daughter is and believes she will certainly see her again.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JudyCr View Post
      Please don't think I'm crazy (I'm not, my mom had me tested) but I don't fear dying because I've actually heard from the dead, and even tho I don't want it to happen soon, I look forward to seeing them again, most especially my dad.
      Actually I was hoping for crazy, always looking for kindred spirits. I'm not a Christian (not sure exactly what I am) but I am curious on what is on the other side, just not in a big hurry to find out.

      In some ways, it has been a blessing that I don't know about my biological family's medical history since I don't fear dying at a younger age from something that perhaps struck down a relative young. Given my past, I'm actually kind of surprised to have lived this long, figured I would have already died in an accident from some of the things I have done but so far, so good.

      But living in fear of dying a certain way, IMHO, is not living. While I have always had a healthy skepticism about CW, allopathic medicine, etc, the PB way of life has given me more structure in the way I do things and has steered me towards a path of learning where I'm realizing that things like early deaths due to "natural" causes are avoidable by simply living simple, eating real food, doing a bit of exercise and avoiding poisons (prescription drugs, food additives, etc).

      If I live another 40 years, I'll do everything I can to live each day without fear of how my days ends. I'll live my life to the fullest and refuse to "act my age". Die I will but if at all possible, I'll do it on my terms.
      Randal
      AKA: Texas Grok

      Originally posted by texas.grok
      Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
      http://hardcoremind.com/

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      • #18
        Unfortunately I didn't learn of a family history of cancer on my maternal grandmother's side until after her funeral, when my Mum caught up with my Gran's estranged family. My Gran died of pancreatic cancer. One of her sisters died of lung cancer, and her only brother was committed to a lunatic asylum after their father commited suicide, and was never heard of again. A second cousin survived cancer of the spine aged 11.

        My Mum was very lucky last year as she had colon cancer detected early through the recently introduced NHS screening programme, before she had any symptoms, and her one-year follow-up was clear.

        At least I have good genes from my father's side and there's no cancer. He's been overweight his whole life but muscular and at 64 looks about 50 and has no serious health problems.

        I keep reminding myself that my maternal grandmother's other two sisters are in good health in their late eighties, have never had cancer, and lead very active social lives. Plus, my grandfathers are 94 and 89 and still live in their own homes.

        Although I have focused on eating healthily for a couple of decades now, I believe that a positive attitude counts for a lot and is just as important as lifestyle factors. I also believe that appreciation of art and nature has amazing powers to heal and prolong life, as well as a general enjoyment of life being beneficial for health.
        F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
          Survival is a much stronger motivator than vanity could ever be.
          Really really like this. APPLAUSE for your recovery and integrity in using what you know.

          Rasputina, I am sorry about all the illness in your family. Take good care of yourself (not meaning to lecture). I smoked for 18 years, found it impossible to quit while caregiving but I gradually cut back and then quit completely a few months after DH died and have not smoked in a year. He had been a smoker since his teens, no way to know how much it contributed to the cancer; he was also a very heavy drinker before he was in my life which is a major contributor to cancers in the liver. I hope your husband finds a way to quit that works for him. Best of wishes to you and your family.
          My Primal Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57034.html

          "...since our orthodox theories have not saved us we may have to readjust them to bring them into harmony with Nature's laws. Nature must be obeyed, not orthodoxy." Weston A. Price

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Rasputina View Post
            My husband still smokes, even though his dad died 11 years ago, from lung cancer.
            I'd urge him to try an electronic cigarette (e-cig). I was a 30+ a day smoker for 30 years with no hope of quitting until I bought an e-cig around 4 months ago. I've not had another cigarette since & have no intentions of doing so, mainly because the e-cig means I've had absolutely no cravings. Being able to put something in your mouth & inhale 'smoke' (actually water vapour) makes them so much more effective than any of the traditional nicotine replacement options.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Radialhead View Post
              I'd urge him to try an electronic cigarette (e-cig). I was a 30+ a day smoker for 30 years with no hope of quitting until I bought an e-cig around 4 months ago. I've not had another cigarette since & have no intentions of doing so, mainly because the e-cig means I've had absolutely no cravings. Being able to put something in your mouth & inhale 'smoke' (actually water vapour) makes them so much more effective than any of the traditional nicotine replacement options.
              +1. I've used electronic cigarettes and weaned myself off them a year ago. I found them a bit of a faff, but much better than some disposable ones I tried that tasted disgusting.

              Raw nicotine is not carcinogenic and can be very beneficial as an anti-inflammatory.
              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by paleo-bunny View Post
                Raw nicotine is not carcinogenic and can be very beneficial as an anti-inflammatory.
                I've been using nicotine-free liquid for a few weeks - perhaps I should switch back. But then again... maybe not.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Radialhead View Post
                  I've been using nicotine-free liquid for a few weeks - perhaps I should switch back. But then again... maybe not.
                  Excellent. Good for you.

                  Depends how you feel. The downside is obviously nicotine's addictive nature plus the cost. I find it better psychologically to be free from that addiction, especially as I have an addictive personality.

                  I've found that eating primally has almost cured most of my inflammatory problems. They tend only to resurface when I get stressed or experiment with reintroducing foods that I may have mild intolerances to.

                  On balance am happier now, being nicotine free.
                  F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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                  • #24
                    I can relate, Rasputina; I was terrified of death from as young as ten.. always thought I had cancer, or would soon develop it. Told my mother about it a few times. She'd try and reassure me, but it didn't help all that much. That stayed with me for some time - a feeling of dread in the background. Then a few years back I found a book that really had a life-changing effect. Have you heard of Eckhart Tolle? It was his book The Power of Now - very enlightening, and before I'd finished reading it the fear had vanished. Another good one of his is A New Earth. Would really recommend them, especially if you get worrisome thoughts.
                    All the best,
                    Randall

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                    • #25
                      Thanks, randal, I am working through my anxiety with plenty of sunshine, exercise, writing and painting. My husband wants to take up meditation again.
                      My husband has quit smoking for years at a time- cold turkey. Ironically he started again when his father died. He knows it's time to quit, but I can't force him to. As for being afraid of death, well, that's not exactly it- I am afraid of loss.

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                      • #26
                        It's like you are dying of cancer over and over again every day in your head when you worry. Instead, go out there and give yourself something to really worry about. Like will the parachute open? Will I get eaten by a bear? Will the bungie cord hold? Something like that.
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                        • #27
                          Not really. My family is actually quite healthy. I never thought of them as healthy until I started medical school and saw people who were in their early 50s and dying of heart failure, cancer, COPD - you name it. My greatgrandma had stomach cancer in her 70s, which was successfully treated, and then ovarian or endometrial cancer a few years ago in her late 80s - again, treated surgically. None of my other relatives, whether my greatgrandfather or younger family members have had cancer. My grandmother had a heart attack fairly early, in her 50s, I believe, but she never exercised at all and had a very stressful job, so I'm not terribly worried about it. We have some mental illness in the family (grandma with schizophrenia, and my father is an undiagnosed bipolar and borderline personality), but it's not that severe. I already have depression, so I'd like to think I've had my share of mental illness and am off the hook otherwise, haha.

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                          • #28
                            The more primal I get the more I see how full of poison the modern world truly is. It's frustrating, but all I can do is minimize my own risk and hope for the best. I'm 31, but I seriously think a good 30-40% of people my age are going to die of cancer. I aim to not be one of them
                            Here to eat and move like a caveman, not look or stink like one

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                            • #29
                              the only cancer in my family was for those who smoked. my mother, a life-long smoker, has had a series of blood-pressure related strokes that has left her with dementia and in a wheelchair. she needs 24-hour care. she is not yet 70.

                              a close friend, a heavy smoker most of his life, just died of lung cancer at 60. his wife, also a former heavy smoker, is dying now of brain cancer.

                              my father's parents both smoked but died peacefully in their late 80s.

                              i don't smoke, lol. i try to do the right things. i do not "fear" cancer, no, but honestly give very little thought to my own death. however seeing my mother, who often doesn't know who i am, makes me know i do not want longevity if it's on those kinds of terms.
                              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                              Ernest Hemingway

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                              • #30
                                OP, you seem to be living in fear. While spending your time with your loved ones and 'make it count' is alright,
                                I don't think you should be doing it because you're afraid.

                                Everybody dies. I don't see any reason to stress yourself over something you can't prevent.

                                You remind me of my mother. She's in her 60's, overweight and obsessed about her lack of health.
                                Every little ache scares her. Even if it's not her "ache".
                                When talking to relatives, it's a pure self-pity fest.
                                When she's like that, I always make a gag - "it must be the brain tumor gettin' bigger!" etc.

                                If you're worried about your psychical, do something about it.
                                If you're doing something about it (livin' primal, for example..) - what else is there to do?

                                The only disease you will get is the one caused by your own anxiety.
                                Last edited by Gilleh; 06-16-2012, 10:46 AM.
                                Everything is bad for something - How do you feel today?

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