Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can I really get a corner of paleo paradise?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Hey entwyf, good to hear that you're finding some positives. You're in Rochester; I'm in Rochester. I'm definitely rooting for you. It is SO possible to eat Primal here. Do you have the ability to visit the public market? We do have the best public market in the nation, you know! You can get good prices on fish, beef and chicken and buy in bulk - just don't strain yourself carrying stuff home! And we have the Genesee River and the Erie Canal and Ontario Beach - the weather's supposed to be gorgeous this weekend! Get outside and soak up some vitamin D. So good! Remember, I'm rooting for you - and saying a prayer, too. Let's be healthy together!!
    Last edited by carlh; 05-25-2012, 08:08 PM.
    carl's cave

    Comment


    • #17
      I was very pleased to read your update of your story. We certainly all have our ups and downs and periods of discouragement or even despair, but I was happy to hear that things are looking brighter for you and that you are regaining your sense of perspective and positive attitude. Keep up the good work!

      Comment


      • #18
        Hi, carlh and BratKat,

        Thanks for such encouraging words.

        I love the public market and hope to get there frequently this summer. I also hope to get out in the sunshine on a regular basis and work in my yard (sadly neglected for a couple of years).

        I don't think I'd say I've REgained a sense of perspective; I'm actually struggling to gain one to start with.

        Living a life fueled by years of SAD and a philosophy of "no pain, no gain" made it impossible to think clearly and rationally. Even now, when I have moments of focus and clarity, I think, "Wow, what's wrong with me?"

        Looking forward to getting my brain and body more in gear. And maybe soon I'll have a good handle on how to get some real sleep.

        Again, thanks for the support. Hope you have a good Memorial Day--with LOTs of juicy hamburgers!

        Edith

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by entwyf View Post
          Looking forward to getting my brain and body more in gear.
          You mentioned posture somewhere in there. The best thing you can do for yourself in that regard is to take 20 minutes out each day to lie on the floor with your knees drawn up and your head supported on two to three thin paperback books. That allows a gentle passive stretch on the spine and also enables accumulated unhelpful tensions in the body to release somewhat. You may have noticed that you're shorter later in the day than when you get out of bed in the morning. That's fluid getting pushed out of your intervertebral disks and also excess muscular tensions pulling you down. If you lie down briefly, it gives those processes a chance to undo. AFAIK, it takes about 18 to 19 minutes for the disks to fully swell again, so 20 minutes is a good length of time to aim for. It's also just about long enough to purge excess adrenaline from the system, if you've become stressed, if you can just be quiet and simply allow yourself to lie there and do nothing -- as with meditation. In fact, it's basically a kind of meditative technique -- being quiet and still -- combined with a position of mechanical advantage.

          There's a PDF here:

          http://freedominaction.com.au/wp-con...handout-CD.pdf

          Or try googling "constructive rest". Alternatively, you can support your knees with bolsters or cushions.

          And maybe soon I'll have a good handle on how to get some real sleep.
          Yeah, the sleep apnea.

          This is a shot in the dark ... but I've just been reading Volek and Phinney's The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living. Now they say that sleep apnea is one of the conditions for which ketogenic diets have been found helpful. In fact, it's one of two conditions not linked with metabolic syndrome -- the other is epilepsy -- for which they say that's true. They don't say why it works, or why they think it works, and they don't actually say much at all. However, they're certainly very knowledgable people with a ton of clinical experience and published papers. Here is Phinney:

          Low Carb Living - YouTube

          Maybe that would be worth a shot? You could try researching it, and see what others have to say on the matter. If you're eating Primal Blueprint style you're already eating low carbohydrate. All you need do to go ketogenic is drop carbohydrate consumption to less than 50 grams per day (while making sure you get enough fluids and electrolytes, especially sodium (e.g. as broad-spectrum seasalt), since the kidneys aggressively dump water and sodium when going ketogenic). There seems little to lose: it takes about 4 to 6 weeks to go ketogenic. It only means a slight adjustment to your current regimen, and if it doesn't help you can just go back to where you were again.

          Anyway, maybe neither suggestion is helpful, but best wishes at any rate.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Lewis View Post
            You mentioned posture somewhere in there. The best thing you can do for yourself in that regard is to take 20 minutes out each day to lie on the floor with your knees drawn up and your head supported on two to three thin paperback books. That allows a gentle passive stretch on the spine and also enables accumulated unhelpful tensions in the body to release somewhat. You may have noticed that you're shorter later in the day than when you get out of bed in the morning. That's fluid getting pushed out of your intervertebral disks and also excess muscular tensions pulling you down. If you lie down briefly, it gives those processes a chance to undo. AFAIK, it takes about 18 to 19 minutes for the disks to fully swell again, so 20 minutes is a good length of time to aim for. It's also just about long enough to purge excess adrenaline from the system, if you've become stressed, if you can just be quiet and simply allow yourself to lie there and do nothing -- as with meditation. In fact, it's basically a kind of meditative technique -- being quiet and still -- combined with a position of mechanical advantage.

            There's a PDF here:

            http://freedominaction.com.au/wp-con...handout-CD.pdf

            Or try googling "constructive rest". Alternatively, you can support your knees with bolsters or cushions.
            Awesome stuff.. thanks for posting this.
            Karin


            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

            What am I doing? Depends on the day.

            Comment


            • #21
              Lewis, thanks for the information indeed. I have always found lying on the floor on my back to be soothing. I haven't done it in a long time because when I do it I often fall asleep, and these days, if I fall asleep, I basically stop breathing. But twenty minutes on the floor as you describe it makes such sense!!!

              As for the effect of low-carb eating on sleep apnea, I I may have had some "sleep apnea" issues most of my life due to having a narrow jaw and narrow nasal passages. I'm sure a ketogenic diet could really nail some of the non-structural issues (such as inflammation), but what I really need is major reconstructive surgery of the inside of my head. Yeah, like that will ever happen.

              Edith

              Comment


              • #22
                Can you rent a room in your house to help pay for the mortgage? Can you downsize? If you can sell, sell. If not, can you rent out your house and find a cheaper apartment/house? Can you live with family/a friend to share expenses?

                Can you find a new job? One that is not so stressful? You could consider being a live-in caretaker of older persons or children if you are so inclined. Then housing, job, and food are all taken care of (I did this for a little while). l

                Good luck! It sounds like you know you have to make changes, but just need a little support doing so. You can do it!
                I'm a 5'-6" tall female.

                SW: 212.4 lbs. February 14, 2013 (My second baby was born)
                CW:166.4 lbs.
                GW: 143 lbs.

                Just keep going.

                New goal:

                Get back to 80-90% Primal and back down to my lowest recent weight of 158 lbs. while doing as much moving and strength training as I can get in.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by entwyf View Post
                  I still have what seems an infinite distance to cover before I can say, "Last night I slept well; this morning I ate well; today I moved well; right now I feel well and focused and energetic."
                  There's been a lot of awesome suggestions on steps to take, so I'm not going to chime in on that. Just wanted to say, that I think that sentence that you feel so far away from saying is exceptional. It's a great way to describe a healthy lifestyle and a large part of what primal is about. Not sure if I've heard it so succinctly and elegantly put before. Kudos. I hope you get there soon.
                  My Primal Journal - Food, pics, the occasional rant, so...the usual.

                  I love cooking. It's sexy science that you stuff in your face. - carlh

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    PrimalJes and DashFire, I thank you for your encouragement.

                    I've been been physically effed up for a long time--due to my own choices (some bad, some trustingly made according to SAD advice)--and I have never been in any way an athelete (though I love to move; I think best when moving). In addition, at age fifty-eight, I don't know how much I can realistically expect to get out of eating like my ancestors ate.

                    I look in the mirror, and even on days when I feel great, I look like crap. Maybe I actually look terrific, having been brainwashed about what constitutes being attractive at any age. But I really do wonder how much difference eating can make when I've spent years eating badly and sleeping badly and when I've been through menopause and am now going through the stress of work.

                    I can certainly improve my understanding of what the body needs to function. And I can continue to make daily changes. It's the old saying: how do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

                    As far as work goes, I can move toward some job goals I have once I can find a way out of my current job--without being downsized, fired, or laid off. But in this economy, at my age, and with a resume based on trying to survive financially rather than building a career, there is no way in hell that I can get another job outside of divine intervention.

                    In my younger years, I did a stint of home health care, but it was a bridge from grad school to a fulltime job. I have a master's degree in English that I have sort of used in the past and still hope to use again.

                    I have recently had enough energy and focus to be able to start really cleaning my house and making it fit for a possible roomer. If I've gotten enough done by the middle of July, I can get word around at my church; we get a fair number of college students.

                    Meanwhile, here I am up too late again. Oh, well, I can always nap tomorrow. I love Sunday naps.

                    Edith

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Edith, I am almost ready to drive to Rochester just to give you a hug!

                      Job stress - I am so glad that you are making headway... my hubby went from a relaxed, sweet, wholesome Midwestern guy to a left-lane-on-the-New-Jersey-Turnpike, Type A, micromanaging SOB. It was a terrible toll on his physical and mental health. Step One was change jobs. I will tell you that that step alone has added years to his life, and years to our marriage - today I can understand what a high-stress job can do to a partnership.

                      This family homeschools, and with your English degree, is there perhaps some tutoring work / seminars you could do? With your background of dyslexia AND dyscalculia, there must be some good advice you can offer to other homeschoolers dealing with these challenges! I know for a fact that more parents are choosing to take the step of taking their challenged children out of public schools. I have no experience with dyslexia, but good grief! - how did you get a master's degree with it - in English?!?! I would actually pay to hear that! The strategies you use to do your job are a marketable asset. In your case, age is an asset - you are not offering purely theoretical advice - this stuff gets your paycheck handed to you. As a general rule the homeschooling community CRAVES information and life experience stories! I, myself, have a special-needs daughter who is in the beginning stages of reading using a pure sight-reading approach, and my ears perk up when I hear of adults living regular lives despite some difficult roadblocks.

                      Primal food - it really does come down this - pay your hard-earned money to the butcher / farmer / health food store / co-op / CSA... or pay it to the doctor. Primal-ness and all-grass-fed beef aside (which I cannot regularly afford for a hearty-eating family of 6), there is always one small thing you can do to improve the food supply, and it is a must. Feed yourself as well as you know how -YOU ARE WORTH IT. For some of the produce - can you get your hands on a library copy of Urban Farm magazine?? This is hands-down the most perfect magazine I have seen in a long time, and I subscribe to it. As the name states, they specialize in growing food, using handy (read - cheap) everyday items, in even the tiniest urban dwellings. The projects are nothing like out here, where the first thing you need is the Big 'Ole John Deere. I am no farmer, but growing cherry tomatoes and basil was yummy and satisfying to the soul and cheap and is leading to an ever-increasing garden. It might be another weapon in the arsenal...

                      As for the old thing... I hear you. I am 45, which will make you laugh at me, but my maternal family has a gray-hair gene (seriously) that causes all the females on that side to gray (actually, go snow-white) very early. I had my first grays at 16 and I have been white-haired now since I was 30. My skin tone went with it. When my girls were little they didn't recognize any photos of me with brown hair. After my fourth (and last) child, I fell into the bottomless pit of post-partum depression and it took a while to climb out. Anti-depressants helped me gain 40 pounds. So now I am this white-haired, pale, blue-eyed, pudgy 45-year-old who for years has been fielding public inquiries about how many other "grandchildren" I have when I am out with my girls. And I worry about my employability as well - I have chosen a traditional stay-at-home life, and do not regret it at all, but what will that look like if I want to join the working world when the kids are grown? I can see it now - "I drove my daughter to therapy for years, does that count?"

                      Tell you what - you don't give up, and neither will I. I plan on looking into the posture post... I always have had bad posture, so this looks interesting. Here is rooting for you!!!
                      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        The tutoring suggestion really is a good one!

                        I am only 3 years into university and I tutor 5-6 hours a week in the evenings/on weekends (I also have another part time job). I charge $20 - $30 an hour, depending on the level I'm tutoring and other variables. It's a very easy way to get cash, which I usually spend entirely on my groceries!

                        I have 2 students with dyslexia actually. There are a lot of students out there with learning difficulties that would appreciate someone who has been there and done that!

                        I got into it through a company at first, where they find the clients and everything, but you get paid less that way and have less freedom. Then I got into it privately just by advertising online and through word of mouth.

                        I tutor everything at high school level - calc, stats, chem, bio physics, english, accounting, economics! I also tutor some of the lower level university stuff in math and business.

                        I'm sure there are some English major undergrads out there who may love to talk to you!

                        Anyway, just building on the suggestion, just thought I'd chime in to let you know tutoring is easy to get into and worth your time!
                        Current weight lost: 82.9lb (37.6kg)

                        Current PRs:
                        Bench: 45kg/99lb
                        Squat: 100kg/220lb
                        Deadlift: 120kg/265lb

                        My blog
                        My journal

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          What can you change- I'd cut back on the the IRA contribution and look for a new job. Retirement money is pointless if you don't make it to retirement.
                          Can you refinance your house?

                          Also, look for a new job. One that is less stressful...or a very easy unstressful part time job. I pet sit and you could probably make an extra $50 a week without much effort, plus you get some walking in.

                          All is easier said than done, but $30 a week is not enough for groceries for a decent diet unless you are self sufficient farming.... and it costs money to garden.

                          http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                          Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            And- yeah- roommate, tutor, proof resumes. Get more income coming in in a less stressful manner.

                            http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                            Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Hi Edith

                              Wow - everyone's given you so much fantastic advice I'm not sure I have much to add. But I really felt for you reading through this post, so I just wanted to send you a few virtual hugs, and congratulate you on making such great progress so far. Your situation is super tough, but you sound so strong and determined - as though you'll wear life down before you'll let it wear you down. I'm really impressed, and I can only hope I'd be as brave as you if I found myself in a similar situation.

                              Glad to see in the updated posts that things are on the up - please keep us posted! We're all rooting for you

                              So, lots and lots of primal love! And keep up the good work - you're doing amazingly!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Edith, I know how it is to feel stressed by your job. Sometimes life feels like an endurance race thatnever ends. I would list the changes I want to see and celebrate each change no matter how tiny. I want you to know you are not alone.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X