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Foodie convert to Paleo seeks tasty grassfed

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  • Foodie convert to Paleo seeks tasty grassfed

    Love the MDA Site; embrace the Paleo Ethic. Gave up bread, pasta, beer; won't give up that sizzlin' steak on the grill or that great prime rib. And, so far, grassfed meat is nasty. Dense, tough, dry, yuckky smelling while cooking, ditto taste. Working on third vendor. What's answer? a) Suck it up, Pal; it's hello Paleo, goodbye Delicious? b) It's Vendor; try X Meat Purveyors? c) It's Method: marinate in X? d)??

    Help, help!

  • #2
    Mostly B and C, though grassfed isn't as tender or as marbled as hormone-injected, infected, cruel, unsustainable, rural-way-of-life-killing, corporate meat. Actually the best steaks I've ever had have been 100% range fed Argentine steers - grassfed is their default and they somehow turn out a high quality product. Aussie meat is darn good too. But I've had tough and dry steaks, too. Mostly they cook faster (more like chicken) because of their leanness and lend themselves to quick preparations and rich sauces.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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    • #3
      I agree with tfarny, mostly B & C.

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      • #4
        Coming back to this - I've had huge success with formerly uncool cuts like oxtail, shank, etc., the best ground beef ever (it's just chuck and fat), but steaks have been less successful. If you buy in bulk you've got a variety of course, but the steaks are the thing that take a different approach. I will also say that my pastured 1/2 pig has got the best chops and steaks ever.
        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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        • #5
          I say it's vendor and method.
          I use a local company that has better prices than the grocery store on most cuts, but I've heard really good things about Wellness Meats and Slanker's. I'm not sure if they'd ship to you (they do ship, but I'm not sure how far,) but the local joint is YT Beef.
          As to method, remember that grassfed doesn't take as long to cook and can't take quite as much abuse as injected- inspected- dejected- neglected meat. If you want well done, you're not going to get a good hunk of cow from grass fed. My best rib roast was garlic slivered and slathered in an olive oil, pepper, and garlic mix, then baked at 500 for 15 min, and finished off until medium rare in a 350* oven. As to steak, I salt and pepper it, coat it in garlic butter, and grill until medium, medium rare, no further.
          Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
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          • #6
            Marinating steaks in a little red wine vinegar seems to soften the muscle tissue up a bit. Also, I've steered(heehee) myself away from previous favorites like sirloin, london broil, flank steak. Those parts of the grassfed cow just don't come out as tender as corn-poisoned feedlot cows. Le sigh. The "price" you pay.
            “Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.” Rumi

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            • #7
              My grass-fed source dry ages the meat for about 2 weeks. This results in a 10% reduction in the amount of meat due to loss of water. They do this to concentrate the flavor. Regular commercial meats are not aged due to the loss of profits--10% less meat is 10% less profit. You are simply used to watery meat.
              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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              • #8
                I soak my grassfed rib-eyes in butter. It isn't the same, but it's good.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                  My grass-fed source dry ages the meat for about 2 weeks. This results in a 10% reduction in the amount of meat due to loss of water. They do this to concentrate the flavor. Regular commercial meats are not aged due to the loss of profits--10% less meat is 10% less profit. You are simply used to watery meat.
                  High quality beef is always dry-aged no matter how it is raised. A good butcher will place the hanging meat in a visible location in fact.
                  If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                    High quality beef is always dry-aged no matter how it is raised. A good butcher will place the hanging meat in a visible location in fact.
                    a good butcher will also have sawdust on the floor, to soak the blood up.

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                    • #11
                      I'm enjoying Chiangus this year, pasture has an impact on end quality too.

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                      • #12
                        I find that the fats in some of the grass-fed beef I've had to be a little gamey. The other thing I found is that if you're going to do a crockpot stew you're better off going conventional meats unless your cooking it less than 8 hours. I made a stew with grass-fed beef and it was so dry and chewy it was awful. Luckily most of the conventional raised stew meats don't have a lot of fat, so I don't feel so guilty when I use it. On the otherhand the naturally raised pork I get becomes delish when I slow cook it, but it does carry a lot of fat.

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                        • #13
                          My choices around here seem to be paying through the nose at a couple of stores to get grass fed beef, or buying at least half a cow from my choice of several ranches. No samples. We did get a quarter of a cow a few years ago when I was in a Paleo phase, and really didn't like the meat. I'm sort of waiting to see what shows up at the farmers markets in April here.

                          I was at Whole Foods a few days ago, and was looking at their beef grading. I noticed they had "level 1" beef that is pasture raised and finished with alfalfa and (thought he said tomatoes but surely potatoes?). The sirloin steak was $8.99 a pound, just a couple dollars more than Costco. The Level 4 completely pastured sirloin steak was $13.99. So I opted for Level 1 and it was the bomb. Pretty lean, but I watched it carefully and it was tasty. Added a little melted butter after cooking, probably didn't hurt.

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                          • #14
                            Just had my first experience with gf from Whole Foods. Was pretty tasty and whoever said to watch the cook time is right. The steaks were not so much dryer as they were "denser". The taste was great, but could definitely see a problem if you tend to cook to well done. Medium rare to medium is probably the sweet spot. We cooked and slathered ours in ghee.

                            We just got a bulk shipment from Montana rancher and will be experimenting with the various cuts. Should be interesting.
                            "When you can't run, you crawl. And when you can't crawl, when you can't do that ... you find someone to carry you."

                            Onward....my primal journal
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                            • #15
                              I've read with grass-fed meat you need to cook it for a little less time.

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