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Keep Your Sugar Out of My Fish!

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  • Keep Your Sugar Out of My Fish!

    So I purchased some smoked salmon the other day from a place that I commonly frequent, and have purchased salmon from before. A couple days after being home and eating about half of the pack, I noticed the ingredients have "sugar" included in them! I'm like "sugar", really in my smoked salmon!? Give me a break people! I don't want candied salmon, I actually happen to eat fish because I like the taste of it. What's sad is I'm pretty sure that it wasn't in this particular brand before. Leads me to believe that they have changed processing plants or something and now add sugar to it!

    Read your ingredients carefully folks! Even recheck the ones you have checked previously!

  • #2
    Is it that wet smoked stuff people usually eat on bagels? That's pretty junky food - its like lunch meat of the fish world. It does usually have some sugar in it, from what I recall.

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    • #3
      wierd

      reminder that we really have to look at labels.
      An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
      -Somebody funny

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      • #4
        I got chicken from the shop the other day. just rotisserie chicken. and the ingredients list included brown sugar.

        mental.

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        • #5
          Sugar is often(almost always) used because there is so much salt in prepared meats.
          Just like salt, expect there to be sugar in anything you didn't cook yourself.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lily Marie View Post
            Is it that wet smoked stuff people usually eat on bagels? That's pretty junky food - its like lunch meat of the fish world. It does usually have some sugar in it, from what I recall.
            No, this is the premium stuff that they claim goes from the sea to the smoker to you. Natural, organic, blah, blah, blah. I mean, I pictured someone wrestling a bald eagle or grizzly bear for the thing!!!!!LOL

            All joking aside, this is supposed to be the good stuff. I know what you're referencing though.....SPAM Salmon!

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            • #7
              I bought a jar of pickled herring and didn't read the ingredients until I got home. I knew there was herring, onions, water, vinegar, and spices. Ingredients are always listed in order of volume, from the most to the least. The second ingredient was "high fructose corn syrup". There's more HFCS in that jar than onions. Onions was listed as third in the order.
              Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

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              • #8
                It may be like 1g of sugar or something. Check the label for the amounts as well as just the ingredients. If it's only a couple grams per serving it's negligible.
                Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

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                • #9
                  Most dry-rubs have at least a little bit of sugar in them because it helps you get a nice carmelization sear on the meat, so perhaps they used something like that on the fish. Remember that things are listed in order from most concentrated to least concentrated. If there's some, like, dry rub or sauce that I really want to try and it has sugar or honey toward the end of the list, I still give it a shot (but only real sugar or honey; i avoid HFCs like the plague).
                  "Since going primal, I've found that there are very few problems that cannot be solved with butter and/or bacon fat."

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                  • #10
                    Sugar is often used in the brine prior to smoking fish. We do all of our own and use a dry brine that includes salt, brown sugar and various spices. The fish is in the brine for about 24 hours before going in the smoker, but I doubt you actually get much sugar in the finished product.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Alaska Ang View Post
                      Sugar is often used in the brine prior to smoking fish. We do all of our own and use a dry brine that includes salt, brown sugar and various spices. The fish is in the brine for about 24 hours before going in the smoker, but I doubt you actually get much sugar in the finished product.
                      That's pretty reassuring Alaska Ang. Perhaps that is the case here. Like I stated before, this is supposed to be the better quality, healthier stuff. Perhaps they just weren't listing the sugar before and were forced to start. It's at the end of the ingredient list, so it's involvement in the salmon is pretty minimal.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Alaska Ang View Post
                        Sugar is often used in the brine prior to smoking fish. We do all of our own and use a dry brine that includes salt, brown sugar and various spices. The fish is in the brine for about 24 hours before going in the smoker, but I doubt you actually get much sugar in the finished product.
                        Yeah, this. I still use a Raichlen grilling recipe that has salmon "cure" in a brown sugar and kosher salt rub for 4 hours, after which you wash it off. There's a minimal amount that may remain as residue, but the primary function is to remove moisture content from the fish, which it does (an amazing amount) before you smoke it. I'd be surprised if more than a few grams actually becomes part of what you eat.

                        This sort of rub (sugar and salt, some dill, and vodka/aquavit) is also used in making gravlax, which cures in the fridge from 2-4 days. It's a great way to make salmon if you've never tried it. Like the recipe above, you wash it off before eating, so the actual amount ingested is rather minimal. For the benefits of the salmon I think the sugar risk is actually worth taking.

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                        • #13
                          My sad story. I was buying the big packages of Foster Farms Tequila Lime chicken wings at my local Costco. They may have had a couple of questionable ingredients, but no sugar. And so tasty and easy to fix when I was working through lunch.

                          They've been replaced with Tyson TL chicken wings which have something like 4g of sugar per serving, from HFCS. Bummer.

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                          • #14
                            I bought Chicken of the Sea pre-made tuna salad in cans to travel with last summer, as I was going on a long flight overseas and wanted something "healthier" than airplane food. Opened the little can, and was shocked by the sweet taste. One of the first ingredients, after tuna, was sugar. I wrote an email to the Chicken of the Sea people, and they replied that sugar was present due to taste-testers preferring it. Bleeech.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Alaska Ang View Post
                              Sugar is often used in the brine prior to smoking fish. We do all of our own and use a dry brine that includes salt, brown sugar and various spices. The fish is in the brine for about 24 hours before going in the smoker, but I doubt you actually get much sugar in the finished product.
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