Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Epidural: Yay or Nay?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    1



    If we had had our childbirth it at home... I would have lost my wife.


    Nothing is more important than having a healthy mother and child, and having the resources or tools available to cover Kebekgirl's Mother Nature.


    I put that ahead of all other decisions.

    Comment


    • #32
      1



      Fairy: I had a certified nurse midwife. I doubt that drugs would have been an option if she were a lay-midwife.


      Vick: With proper prescreening, virtually all high-risk pregnancies are caught ahead of time. Multiple births or breech births, for instance, would not be allowed at home.


      Is that a 100% guarantee? Of course not. There's also no guarantee that all the interventions they inflict on women in hospitals will not cause death.


      Statistics are very muddy about how many women are saved during hospital births from complications which are caused by other hospital procedures, inducing labor being the primary one.

      Comment


      • #33
        1



        Vick, several studies have demonstrated that for a healthy, low risk pregnancy, with a skilled birth attendant, morbidity & mortality are equal to or slightly lower to hospital birth morbidity & mortality. In other words, the chance of a negative outcome in a homebirth is equal to or slightly less than the chance of a negative hospital birth outcome. What this means is that while there are some situations that are better handled in a hospital, there are other situations that are better handled at home, with a midwife.


        That said, everyone should be free to seek out the birth location and attendant that makes them feel most comfy. Assuming the location of choice is not the back of a taxi cab with the cab driver as the attendant, I'm good with it. :-)

        Comment


        • #34
          1



          Copy/pasting the first part from my journal:


          not planning on having one, but if a situation arises where they HAVE to give me pitocin for some reason (like if my water breaks and labor doesn't start within 24 hours) to induce labor, I will be open to an epidural. Pitocin doesn't have the "feel good effects" that oxytocin (the natural labor-starting hormone) has... so you get all the strength of birthing contractions without any of the mitigating effects of "the hormone of love." heh... sucks.


          would love a birthing tub/jacuzzi but our hospital doesn't have them, and i can't switch hospitals or use a birthing center or do a home birth without switching my insurance plan - and since i LOVE the midwife at the hospital I'll put up with no tub. haha. She did mention being able to shower during labor though (just in passing - we didn't really discuss it) which sounds nice too. Just warm water running over you... sounds helpful.


          The Business of Being Born is on my netflix instant queue. I just haven't had time to sit down and watch it yet though. Looking forward to it though.

          <hr />


          Also, I&#39;m trying to be open to the idea that things may not go as planned... my mother WANTED an epidural for every one of her births (4 kids) but had a natural birth each time for various reasons - even through back labor with one of us (was it me? I think...).


          On the other hand, my nanny-boss wanted to have totally natural births for both of her kids, but with her first, she labored for THREE DAYS (72 hours) before her son was in distress and they had to do an emergency C-section.

          With her second, she had planned for a natural VBAC but her baby was breach and wouldn&#39;t flip - she even tried going to an accupuncturist who said he could use pressure points to get her to flip - for weeks, but she only turned about 90 degrees. So she had to have a C-section with her too.


          My sister had epidurals and I think she was in the "epis are awesome" camp...


          ONE reason I want to have a natural labor and delivery is because of my breast reduction and desire to breastfeed. The drugs can affect you and your baby for several hours after birth, and the first hour after delivering the placenta is VERY important for developing prolactin receptors in the breast for breastfeeding - skin to skin contact w/baby, eye contact, and immediate nursing are all optimal during this time. If one or both of you is "out of it" it&#39;s not the same.


          Of course, most women can breastfeed with no issue even after an epidural, but with my surgery I don&#39;t want to take any chances I don&#39;t have to take.


          My midwife is supportive of my desire for a natural birth (obviously) but she told me that if it gets too painful and I need a break they have a drug (forget what it is) that they can put in through an IV and it wears off in about an hour - she said it&#39;s very very mild but that some women do get the break they need and a "second wind" from it. That seems like a good middle-ground to me... it doesn&#39;t have to be all or nothing.


          PS Also I want to make sure no one cuts the umbilical cord right away - I want to wait until all the goodness in it goes into the baby (think of it as the baby&#39;s last "pregnancy" meal) and the cord is white and empty. You may want to look into delayed cord cutting too ...

          Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

          Comment


          • #35
            1



            also read these. i cried - so awesome.

            http://www.dooce.com/2009/07/13/labor-story-part-one

            http://www.dooce.com/2009/07/27/labor-story-part-two

            http://www.dooce.com/2009/08/04/labor-story-part-three

            Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

            Comment


            • #36
              1



              I don&#39;t want anyone to be on the negative side of statistics.


              Technology has certainly improved since our kids were born, but the Boy Scout motto says it all. "Be Prepared"

              Comment


              • #37
                1



                My daughter was born nearly 22 years ago and yes, I had an epidural. No problems, no after effects. I did have a choice, but my doctor ( female with 3 children of her own) said "why be a hero?" and it made sense at the time. I got sick to my stomach from the pain ( I started with 5 minute contractions - no prior warning) and I have very high pain tolerance usually. I remember being glad for the epidural. I could still feel the birth just fine but without harsh pain and I remember the doctor saying the epi had just about worn off anyway. I was only in hospital for labor 5 hours from start to finish. I felt great afterwards and I went home the next day. I sure I would have been fine without it - I did have the choice - but I don&#39;t regret having it either. Maybe I was lucky.

                Comment


                • #38
                  1

                  [quote]

                  Fairy: I had a certified nurse midwife. I doubt that drugs would have been an option if she were a lay-midwife.</blockquote>


                  I had a certified nurse midwife as well. Maybe it differs by state, or maybe that&#39;s just a midwife&#39;s personal decision to make...


                  And just wanted to say &#39;here here&#39; on all that Pikaia said. Homebirth is ONLY recommended/proven safe/etc. in low-risk pregnancies. My (amazing, very experienced) midwife has taken women to the hospital when necessary, (or when not necessary, but when they really wanted to go for pain relief, etc.), by car or ambulance, whatever was required/the best choice/option. Birth complications in a low risk labor/birth are typically slow coming (you usually have advance warning, and time to make tough decisions, etc.), but as Vick said, it is important to be prepared for anything. And it&#39;s obviously not for everyone, but another option worth looking into IMO!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    1



                    As the saying goes, "Birth is as safe as life gets."


                    Vick, no one wants to be on the negative side of the statistics. Unfortunately, just being at the hospital puts some women and their babies on the wrong side of the stats. And I assure you, midwives and the families who choose homebirth do not want for preparation.


                    Again, many studies have shown that in the context of a low risk pregnancy with a trained attendant, homebirth statistics are equal to or better than those of hospital births. Doesn&#39;t that say it all?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      1

                      [quote]

                      Again, many studies have shown that in the context of a low risk pregnancy with a trained attendant, homebirth statistics are equal to or better than those of hospital births. Doesn&#39;t that say it all?</blockquote>


                      IMO, yes!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        1



                        FNW, be sure to do some research on Stadol, rather than relying on your midwife&#39;s description of its effects. That&#39;s probably the drug your midwife was talking about. Nubain or Demerol are other possibilities.


                        Many women find these drugs either ineffective or report that rather than "taking the edge off," it made them feel loopy.


                        As these drugs are administered by IV rather than into your epidural space, they DO get to the baby, and can definitely affect the baby&#39;s alertness after birth.


                        You&#39;ll find plenty of discussion of these drugs on the MDC Birth & Beyond subforum.


                        My sister forgot what she had read about Stadol before she had her first, and consented to it with her second baby last month. She said it didn&#39;t dull the pain, but made her feel high. According to her, that combination was way worse than the pain alone. :-(

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          1



                          thanks for the drug names - i couldn&#39;t remember what she said it was , but now i have a place to start reading/googling. thanks.


                          i definitely don&#39;t plan to use anything if i can avoid it - and i have had things that are supposed to be calming end up causing me to feel out of control / panicked / anxious... and also one drug which was supposed to have a side-effect of "dreamless sleep" caused me to have intense nightmares.

                          I&#39;m not a fan of drugs in general.

                          Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            1



                            Gosh, sorry to drag this out, but just wanted to add one more thing a/b my own homebirth. (I realize this thread is not really about homebirth, but I really wanted to share!!)


                            I had what would often be considered 2 &#39;birth emergencies&#39; during my birth at home, which were expertly and smoothly handled by my experienced CNM. My son (who was really big, 10 lbs, 4 oz, 22 inches long--but totally healthy--no gestational diabetes in me or him etc--I get that question a lot :/), had shoulder dystocia on his way out. (Heartrate fine the whole time.) Shoulder dystocia is often considered an emergency in the hosptial, but my midwife used her hand to gently help him come out, had me move a little bit, and I got a small tear (no episiodomy, etc.). It was really no big deal at all. (For comparison, my younger cousin who was born in a hospital w/ his mom flat on her back during the pushing/birth, &#39;had&#39; to have his collar bone BROKEN by the doctor in order to get him out. I don&#39;t know that this is commonplace in hospital births, but I just recall being told, "It HAD to happen, or THEY couldn&#39;t have gotten him out"...)


                            I also had postpartum hemorrhage immediately after the birth (I believe due to my uterus being really tired from a long labor) and lost a liter of blood. My midwife gave me a couple of shots of pitocin immediately which stopped the bleeding, and other than being quite a bit more tired than your typical &#39;I just gave birth&#39; new mom (I&#39;ve heard most women get a rush of endorphins, which I didn&#39;t really experience), I was 100% fine. I never needed or wanted to leave the comfort of my home for any of this, and felt completely safe and cared for during the whole experience by my highly skilled midwife.


                            Just felt the urge to share this experience as birth is not simple, but much of what are considered &#39;emergencies&#39; might also be viewed as slight obstacles or things to just deal with expertly and efficiently by the right care provider...

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              1



                              Did anyone see the superbowl commercial ad for the new movie The Back-up Plan with Jennifer Lopez? I totally thought of this thread and got a good chuckle from the lady giving birth in a blow-up plastic kiddie pool in her living room. The visual was hilarious. Sorry- as you were...

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                1



                                Maba,


                                Email me on Facebook and I can tell you about my birth experience. If you&#39;re interested! :-)


                                I wanted natural childbirth all the way too. To the point where I didn&#39;t even CONSIDER the chance that I might end up under the knife. I didn&#39;t research it at all because it just wasn&#39;t going to happen to me. Then Xander didn&#39;t flip, didn&#39;t flip, didn&#39;t flip... and I was 40 weeks along with a 9+ pound breech baby. There was NO WAY any doctor in the area was going to let me deliver naturally, and believe me, I LOOKED. So all my natural childbirth prep - the hypnobirthing class and waterbirthing rental and bradley breathing dvd - went out the window.


                                I did not end up with the epidural. I ended up having my c-section with a spinal block. I can tell you that it was MUCH better than I&#39;d anticipated on. It took effect VERY quickly, there were no side effects (besides the ridiculously powerful birth-shakes but you get those with natural births too). I didn&#39;t end up with a headache and once the numbness wore off the pain meds had kicked in. And since I had a spinal block my kid was unaffected by the medication... we could start breastfeeding as soon as they brought him in to me.


                                I CAN say this... it&#39;s a month later and I&#39;m still not fully recovered. I still hurt, I still need the extra-strength ibuprofen, and I still wish I&#39;d had my natural childbirth. I&#39;m VERY bitter about it actually.


                                SO - and I say this with all honesty - be prepared. Prepare for the worst, hope for the best, and don&#39;t make the mistake I did and let yourself get all wrapped up in the HOW your baby comes into the world. Because if you do (and it&#39;s so easy to think the HOW is the most important thing!!!) you run the risk of being disappointed.


                                With that said, I&#39;ll smack anyone who says that the ONLY important thing is a healthy baby and what the Mom goes through to have one doesn&#39;t matter. Screw that noise and the jerks who spout it. There&#39;s a reason the incidences of PPD and PTSD are quadrupled in women who have to have c-sections versus natural birth. Jackasses.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X