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does anyone put cabbage in a drum and let it sit in water for a long time?

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  • does anyone put cabbage in a drum and let it sit in water for a long time?

    what is this called in english language? my father used to do it. they called it 'kiseli kupus' in the old country, which would translate to sour cabbage.

  • #2
    Sounds like Sauerkraut to me. Have never made it but read a great book about it one time - Wild Fermentation.

    Basically shread cabbage, submerge in water with a plate or something heave on top to keep cabbage below water line, and let it sit. Think that's about it.
    Trying a journal. We'll see how long that lasts....

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37152.html

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    • #3
      Originally posted by VeloCity.X View Post
      Sounds like Sauerkraut to me. Have never made it but read a great book about it one time - Wild Fermentation.

      Basically shread cabbage, submerge in water with a plate or something heave on top to keep cabbage below water line, and let it sit. Think that's about it.
      That's exactly it! So this is sauerkraut. Very good.

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      • #4
        I've always sprinked mine with salt as I pack it down in the crock, didn't know it would kraut without. Put a weight on top (plate, bag of water, etc.) to keep it submerged, park it in a cool spot like a basement or unheated room & forget it for a few weeks. Good stuff and really good for you.

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        • #5
          can you tell me more about how it's good for you, LJH? my father used to do this every year, but i was never a fan, but now i see the wisdom.

          we used to make what we call 'sarma', which is ground beef rolled in these kiseli kupus leaves; i think we got this when the turks invaded europe and left their coffee and sarma in bosnia.

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          • #6
            I just made my first batch recently and it was awesome. I'd made kimchi before, but wanted to switch it up.

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            • #7
              Dado, it's supposed to be an outstanding probiotic and great for the gut cooties, etc. I dunno, I just grew up loving the stuff and make it regularly.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LJH View Post
                Dado, it's supposed to be an outstanding probiotic and great for the gut cooties, etc. I dunno, I just grew up loving the stuff and make it regularly.
                very cool. are you slavic too, or is this something many countries do? i grew up thinking it was a yugoslav thing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dado View Post
                  very cool. are you slavic too, or is this something many countries do? i grew up thinking it was a yugoslav thing.
                  Sauerkraut is actually a German word (sour+cabbage). They eat a lot of it. I used to be married to a German.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                    Sauerkraut is actually a German word (sour+cabbage). They eat a lot of it. I used to be married to a German.
                    thank you paleobird.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dado View Post
                      very cool. are you slavic too, or is this something many countries do? i grew up thinking it was a yugoslav thing.
                      I wish, maybe then I'd have better cheekbones. Nope, just a Euro-mutt; German, Irish, Dutch, English as far as I know. And I always though it was German in origin. I mean, the Allies called Germans 'Krauts' during WWII, right?

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                      • #12
                        so you guys are telling me the germans make the saurkraut the same way as the yugoslavs?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dado View Post
                          so you guys are telling me the germans make the saurkraut the same way as the yugoslavs?
                          Didn't the Prussian Empire cover both areas at one time?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                            Didn't the Prussian Empire cover both areas at one time?
                            no, austria hungary held the noose around our necks for several hundred years.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                              Sauerkraut is actually a German word (sour+cabbage). .
                              Yes, I had meant to point out that little bit of irony with dado's original question of the 'english word for it'. Ha!

                              The book 'Wild Fermentation' gets into all sorts of probiotic type health reasons for eating fermented foods - yogurts, krauts, pickles, some cheeses, etc. One of the earliest methods of food storage around.
                              Trying a journal. We'll see how long that lasts....

                              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37152.html

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