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A return and a question.

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  • A return and a question.

    It's been quite a while since I've been online. I fell off the wagon big time and have had a lot of major changes in my life.

    I was living the primal lifestyle for 3 or 4 months back when I posted here a lot. I lost a good amount of body fat and was even noticing some muscle development which was a new thing as I was very sedentary in high school.

    The last time I was here, I was living in the U.S. Virgin Islands as a bachelor. I'm now in Florida, married to the most wonderful woman I've ever met and about to have a baby boy (due date is Thanksgiving day!).

    I stopped living primally because the fridge at my place in st. croix broke and I had to eat out for 2 weeks until it was fixed. By the time it was fixed I was too lazy to care anymore. By the time I cared again, my (now) wife and I were living together and she was not on board. Now that we're in Florida and our boy is almost out, she's decided she's willing to give the 21 day jump start a shot once she recovers from the birth and is passed the intense cravings. I can't begin to tell you how excited I am!

    This brings me to the question part of this posts. We're interested in disaster preparedness, not as in "the zombies are coming!" but more along the lines of being prepared for a possible job loss in this economy (I'm the only income earner, which is how we both want it to be) or a natural disaster that disrupts services like electric and water.

    We think having a 3 to 6 month supply of fresh water and non-perishable food is a good idea. The problem is, I don't know how to stock that much food that would fit primal criteria. The only way to make stocking like that worth it under any circumstances is to use it even if nothing happens and just replace as you go.

    Any thoughts on how to get a 3-6 month stock of primal food?
    www.primalfreedom.blogspot.com

    If a man has the right to self-ownership, to the control of his life, then in the real world he must also have the right to sustain his life by grappling with and transforming resources; he must be able to own the ground and the resources on which he stands and which he must use. In short, to sustain his human right. - Murray Rothbard

  • #2
    congratulations and congratulations.

    i'm sorry that i cannot answer your questions.

    Comment


    • #3
      (though, i would recommend learning to forage, as you would get a good deal of free, fresh, and primal foods this way.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the reply Zoebird! Foraging is a great idea!

        My wife and I dream of getting an acre or two somewhere and farming. We want to practice permaculture and grow only veggies, berries, nuts and raise some chickens and rabbits. No grains or legumes. Once we get to that point we'll jar, can and preserve. We also want to homeschool and start a small woodworking business that I'll run and a handmade soap/lotion business that she'll run by making essential oils from things we grow. We're pretty damn...well, what's the primal equivalent of granola?

        Of course that's a long way off, so self sufficiency has to come from storing until then.
        www.primalfreedom.blogspot.com

        If a man has the right to self-ownership, to the control of his life, then in the real world he must also have the right to sustain his life by grappling with and transforming resources; he must be able to own the ground and the resources on which he stands and which he must use. In short, to sustain his human right. - Murray Rothbard

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        • #5
          i would recommend guinea pigs as well as rabbits -- as the food is good. you might also consider ducks, which raise like chickens as well. A lot of small permaculturists here do that. Some will do miniature goats as well (for cheese and butter), but that's not always necessary.

          Comment


          • #6
            You could always get into canning and jarring now. Buy some extra veggies every grocery trip and tuck them away with your water.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks darby. Any suggestions on where to start with info on canning?
              www.primalfreedom.blogspot.com

              If a man has the right to self-ownership, to the control of his life, then in the real world he must also have the right to sustain his life by grappling with and transforming resources; he must be able to own the ground and the resources on which he stands and which he must use. In short, to sustain his human right. - Murray Rothbard

              Comment


              • #8
                The Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving and Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving (I don't know how much of a difference there is) seem to be the beginning books to get. I know very little myself, I plan on getting into it simply because my love of pickles and to go off from there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oh yeah, just so everyone is aware, I'll be using the suggestions here to write a post for an upcoming blog that deals with disaster/disruption preparedness.
                  www.primalfreedom.blogspot.com

                  If a man has the right to self-ownership, to the control of his life, then in the real world he must also have the right to sustain his life by grappling with and transforming resources; he must be able to own the ground and the resources on which he stands and which he must use. In short, to sustain his human right. - Murray Rothbard

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JohnOTD View Post
                    Thanks for the reply Zoebird! Foraging is a great idea!

                    My wife and I dream of getting an acre or two somewhere and farming. We want to practice permaculture and grow only veggies, berries, nuts and raise some chickens and rabbits. No grains or legumes. Once we get to that point we'll jar, can and preserve. We also want to homeschool and start a small woodworking business that I'll run and a handmade soap/lotion business that she'll run by making essential oils from things we grow. We're pretty damn...well, what's the primal equivalent of granola?

                    Of course that's a long way off, so self sufficiency has to come from storing until then.
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                    Last edited by tapper47; 11-07-2011, 06:57 AM. Reason: clarify

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Water is tough to store as if you use plastic it degrades and they end up leaking (wonder how I know that?), so we used to just keep the bathtubs very clean (you fill it with water at the first thought of need), always had clorox on hand, and the ability to boil the water (charcoal grill). When we lived in Fl, we also had a swimming pool, so we could use it to clean ourselves, just suds up and jump in. Also, not sure how primal this is, but I think there are water purifying tablets you can get at camping stores.
                      Chris
                      "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass. It is about learning to dance in the rain."
                      Unknown

                      My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread36279.html

                      My "Program": doing my version of a 4:3 - 3 day fast diet with real food every day, with a little twist of anti-inflammatory mixed in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm writing a blog about affordable preparation which rules out freeze dried. Thanks for the idea though.
                        www.primalfreedom.blogspot.com

                        If a man has the right to self-ownership, to the control of his life, then in the real world he must also have the right to sustain his life by grappling with and transforming resources; he must be able to own the ground and the resources on which he stands and which he must use. In short, to sustain his human right. - Murray Rothbard

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had a farm at one time and preserved/canned at least a 1 year supply of food. Since changing my eating habits, I do not think canned food is very primal at all and when I find a new place to farm, I will be using other methods. First, most veggies require extreme heat to can them, killing off anything good in them which turns them into nothing more than fillers. Most fruits require lots of sugar. If I were to do it again, I would dehydrate everything. It preserves the nutrients, easier to store, and is lighter. I dehydrated lots of summer fruits/veggies and stored them in a mason jar that I simply water bath canned to seal. One jar lasted about a year and a half and was still edible. Meats can also be dehydrated but I personally like the salted and smoked variety. It can easily be done without nitrates and was a primary staple before canning was invented. Sausage and bacon can also be preserved in lard. Lacto fermentation is another way to preserve foods, although I'm not sure what the shelf life is. Cheese is nothing but preserved milk and I have sucessfully canned butter. So basically, when I have the land and space to stock up, I will be looking older methods. If you are still interested in canning and prepardness, go to backwoodshome.com . They have a section on canning and food preservation.

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                          • #14
                            If you don't already, learn how to build a proper fire for cooking & boiling water. Learn also how to prepare a fresh kill. This way you can boil water from most sources to make it safe, and completely prepare your own meat!

                            (adds these things to life-long "to do" list)
                            Depression Lies

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                            • #15
                              lacto fermentation has a self life of 8-12 months.

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