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  • Hunting with dogs

    I have a dog who is a hunting dog. Or his breed is. He is still a pup. He's one of the old old breeds of what is termed versatile hunters so he can, in theory, hunt anything. I dont know much about it, but my feeling is we have been hunting with dogs forever so it is a very natural primitive activity. It combines alot of good exercise patterns such as sprinting and walking all day, getting out in the bush, load bearing carrying the quarry home and so on. Getting decent food and also valuing the effort which goes into getting your own food. One of my most favourite things is to follow him around the bush or down the beach. Or even go out with a pack of dogs. Anyone else here into hunting with dogs? if so, what do you hunt?

  • #2
    I know very little about it since hunting, in my family, was sadly restricted to men. I was just wondering what breed of dog you have.

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    • #3
      My dog is a mutt who grew up feral in Mexico. He hunts gophers, squirrels, seagulls, etc. He even catches them sometimes.

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      • #4
        I got a hungarian vizsla. paleobird, what do you do with the animals he catches?

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        • #5
          My three labrador retrievers are all trained for hunting - but none of them are very good at it, so we've never really used them for it. Luka is scared of dead animals, has no self confidence and thus gets insecure when she does tasks far from me.
          Laika is... not very interested. She drops the target.
          Nala was probably the best of them. My dad did bring her once or twice though, but when she was sent out to pick up a duck they'd shot, she sniffed but didn't bring it back... my dad had to go fetch himself

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          • #6
            lol my neighbour has a lab which i am sure is somehow damaged as it is so dopey. it is only a pup and it moves so so slowly. it is a very sweet natured dog tho but nothing like mine in terms of movement. i have heard about labs being used on deer but only hearsay. no actual first hand accounts. by all accounts they make terrible pig dogs as they are too scared. much better crossed with something like a staffy. my dogs' breed are supposed to work close in with you. he definitely has a very strong retrieve instinct as he will always bring me something when i come home to show me how happy he is to see me and readily drops it when i tell him to. he's done this since we got him at 9 weeks. he doesnt stray that far in the bush either and has always come back when i have called him. he's not found anything to stalk yet other than on the beach, so that will be the next test. bissen you would be slutted if you had to wade out and get your own duck when you have a retrieving dog. does the dog swim normally? mine voluntarily gets in the water and all the lab crosses i know like to swim. especially if you throw them a stick to fetch. the other thing is do they come from show or hunting lines? my dog comes from full hunting lines. they were so rare till relatively recently they were all proper hunting dogs. once they start getting showed they dont get selected anymore for their hunting ability so it could well be hit and miss how inate it is.

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            • #7
              I've got a Vizsla as well (female). She's pointed pheasant, quail, and chukkar for me. She's retrieved dove for me. She loves chasing squirrels. I'm not a duck hunter, but they are also used in the water to retieve ducks. There are better pointing breeds, but they can't do the other things a vizsla can do. I haven't needed to yet, but if the need arises, I would let her try and track a deer if I can't find it myself. They are great dogs. I can't imagine ever not having at least one. She's also been good around my 2 year old daughter; very protective.

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              • #8
                We have Australian cattle dogs, which are herders. They have a very strong prey drive but I don't know how good they'd be at hunting. Probably with the right training. I saw something about using stumpies, which are related, for hunting pigs, which doesn't surprise me as they tend to not be afraid of much. We don't hunt so it's no point, but encourage our dogs to catch and eat what they can when we're out. The older one is a killing machine. Moles, rats, ground hogs, field mice, the occasional squirrel. The younger one has started learning from her but he isn't as good a hunter. He's still a bit dopey though. When he matures he'll likely get better. I think it's important to the dog's mental well being to exercise their natural instincts. We don't have access to livestock, otherwise I'd get them to do some actual herding, but they get daily herding ball exercise along with the long romps where they can be dogs, have plenty of freedom.
                Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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                • #9
                  Our greyhounds do a lot of hunting on their own, if anything happens to make the mistake of coming into their yard. I'd love to have some coursing dogs to take out west to course jacks, but I'm too nervous to do it with my retired racers and no one experienced enough around here to teach me how to train them properly.
                  Heather and the hounds - Make a Fast Friend, Adopt a Greyhound!

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                  • #10
                    Contact the Rod and Gun Club Directory about finding a local club and then ask the local club if they know anyone that likes to train people & dogs in hunting

                    My father competed internationally in tracking with Beagles, it's a lot of experience that you learn in the field
                    Starting Date: Dec 18, 2010
                    Starting Weight: 294 pounds
                    Current Weight: 235 pounds
                    Goal Weight: 195 pounds

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                    • #11
                      I've never had my own hunting dog... but have been on numorous hunts where they are utilized... mostly as retrievers.

                      I have a buddy who often will bring his lab duck hunting with us. It's great to have him there... especially when you drop a duck and it lands 40 yds away in the middle of a swamp.

                      I know a few people back home who go out in the woods with a large number of dogs and chase down pigs. I've never gone along on one of these trips but they sound pretty exciting.
                      "Canned food is a perversion,' Ignatius said. 'I suspect that it is ultimately very damaging to the soul."
                      - John Kennedy Toole (A Confederacy of Dunces)

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                      • #12
                        Hunting dogs are working animals, not pets. I'm not saying that the two are mutually exclusive, but great hunting dogs hunt.. and that is all they do. Retrievers are a different story, I don't really consider them "hunting" dogs. I've had good success with goldens on the dove field and hunting ducks. I haven't owned hunting dogs since I was a kid. We had several pointers as a kid that we used exclusively for quail hunting. We "owned" a blue tick that ran with a pack of dogs for deer.. but it was kept with the other dogs at the camp. When I quail hunt now, I typically use a guide who has dogs. I rabbit hunt about once a year with a guy I work with that keeps a pack of beagles for rabbit hunting.

                        My pet is Blue Heeler.. When she was younger, she'd go to the woods with me, hike, chase me while I was trail riding on my bike.. She would chase the hell out of a squirrel and she has the working dog mentality, but she'd rather be on the couch getting her ears rubbed than be in the woods chasing an animal.. Of course now that she's 13, I'm just happy she's still alive when I get up in the morning.
                        Last edited by tcb; 10-27-2011, 08:01 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bissen View Post
                          My three labrador retrievers are all trained for hunting - but none of them are very good at it, so we've never really used them for it. Luka is scared of dead animals, has no self confidence and thus gets insecure when she does tasks far from me.
                          Laika is... not very interested. She drops the target.
                          Nala was probably the best of them. My dad did bring her once or twice though, but when she was sent out to pick up a duck they'd shot, she sniffed but didn't bring it back... my dad had to go fetch himself
                          I literally know people with those names, though not spelled the same way.
                          I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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                          • #14
                            During my time as a substitute teacher, I realised a 10-year old boy (my dogs are all female) was named "Luca", would you imagine how glad I was that I DID NOT say "Oh, my dogs is called Luka too!"? -Very.

                            I don't know people called neither Nala or Laika, though...

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                            • #15
                              vizslas are a very old breed of dog. 10th century i think. they were the warlords hunting dogs and by all accounts were kept in the castles. IME the old breeds of domesticated animals such as arab horses, siamese, burmese and abysinnian cats, vizslas are incredibly smart and ppl orientated as they had no passengers back in the day. vizslas are def pets as well as hunting dogs. they have also never "worked" which means they have no desire to round up stock .i am unfenced rural so the last thing i need is a dog who decides to break out and do a bit of impromptu sheep herding. some of the best pig dogs i know also are pets too. when you think how useful a dog would have been before we had supermarkets and take aways you can see how they could become quite cherished. i am gonna go see my local deer stalkers and also find out about getting permits to go deer hunting. i could just take the dog pig hunting but that is a different type of hunting and i would rather he did deer first. there's a good website here on pighunting Monteria Boar Hunts :: Dog and Dagger - Medieval Style - No firearms.

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