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  • Need Some Expert Opinions

    I've been eating primal for about a month now. I still weigh the same as when I started. I need to lose about 20 lbs, I'm not worried about the weight. I'm still figuring out what works for me. I know I ate too many nuts and cheese the first couple weeks so now I have cut those out. I've known for sometime now that grains were the cause of most health problems and I don't plan on starting them again. In fact I don't miss them.

    This is where I need opinions. I can't afford to feed my family grass fed beef, all organic produce, free range chicken etc. It's just too expensive right now. I'm just wondering if eating corn fed beef, bacon with nitrates etc may do more harm than good in the long run and maybe that's why some of us don't get the great results?

  • #2
    I am not an expert, and this is kind of a tricky question. More harm than good in relation to what? They will do more harm than the organic, grass-fed, pastured choices. Will they do more harm than a vegetarian diet? Are the veggies organic? I have a suggestion:

    Budget more money for food. You'd be surprised where you can cut (cable, cell phone service, etc...). This doesn't necessarily mean to budget enough to get all of your food at the highest quality. It means to try to find a few extra dollars to get pastured, organic eggs and butter and maybe some organic, grass-fed ground beef and broth bones every now and then. Buy organic when you are purchasing "dirty dozen" fruits and vegetables. This will improve your diet considerably.

    In the end, eliminating grains and eating real food, even if it is conventional, will still reap benefits. My guess is that the "lack of results" is coming from other things. With a quick search of the forum, you can find folks who have also been slow to see results and you can see the advice they are offered.
    Last edited by Yvonne PHX; 10-21-2011, 10:20 AM.

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    • #3
      indeed, i am an expert, and i will tell you that eating regular meats is not the reason for your lack of good results.

      in the long run, no, you will be fine.

      organic, grass-fed, this is a huge scam industry. a producer can tweak one variable one way or the other and they can slap a grass-fed label on it.

      an organic or grass-fed label is no guarantee that your meat is healthier.

      organic, grass-fed is for people who like to throw money around so that they can feel better about themselves, and so they can feel they are good people. people like U2's Bono.

      eat the regular meats and you will be fine.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dado View Post
        indeed, i am an expert, and i will tell you that eating regular meats is not the reason for your lack of good results.

        in the long run, no, you will be fine.

        organic, grass-fed, this is a huge scam industry. a producer can tweak one variable one way or the other and they can slap a grass-fed label on it.

        an organic or grass-fed label is no guarantee that your meat is healthier.

        organic, grass-fed is for people who like to throw money around so that they can feel better about themselves, and so they can feel they are good people. people like U2's Bono.

        eat the regular meats and you will be fine.
        Bullshit. You can't claim 100% grass-fed if the cows have been fed grains. That is illegal. The organic label is less meaningful, that's true, and means less with regard to meat. But 100% grass-fed actually is nutritionally superior to grain-finished meat. I will pay up for 100% grass-fed, but not for organic with beef.

        That said, it is much better for your health to eat grain-fed meat than not to eat meat at all. You are still getting the benefits of the animal protein, B vitamins, saturated fat, etc. If you can work some regular oily fish into your diet as well (canned sardines and similar small oily fish are cheap, if you can stomach them, and are very nutritious), that will go a long way toward correcting the omega-3 deficiency in the grain-fed products.
        Today I will: Eat food, not poison. Plan for success, not settle for failure. Live my real life, not a virtual one. Move and grow, not sit and die.

        My Primal Journal

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        • #5
          Grass-fed and finished/pastured is definitely better than regular store beef, but do not let the search for perfect get in the way of good. Also, check for other animals -- lamb, bison/buffalo, duck, etc. You can also use many "lesser" cuts -- hamburger, of course, brisket, chuck roast, etc. If you are cooking at home rather than eating out, you may find that you can upgrade you meat choices and still save money. And you can cook in bulk and freeze leftover meals.

          And don't forget foods like liver (which I have always loved, but there are many great recipes on this site) and of course, fish. Right now you may still find Copper River salmon frozen (Costco) due to a great run last year. Or go for canned salmon, preferably Pacific salmon (not farmed) and canned tuna! I always have some small cans of tuna with me for emergencies -- can always put on a green salad for a nice lunch.

          If you can only afford one organic/pastured thing, try for eggs. You can also get Omega-3 eggs, which are fed with flax seed to help the 3/6 profile.

          Look for uncured bacon -- it doesn't cost that much more and doesn't have the nitrates/nitrites.
          Life is an ongoing Experiment of One, so here's to science!

          My Primal Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37576.html

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          • #6
            Thanks everyone, great advice. I do know that my lack of results is my fault. Over doing the nuts & cheese and also not exercising like I should. I'm working on that.

            Thanks agian for the great tips!

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            • #7
              you can't overdo it on the cheese. on the nuts, yes, you can go too much.

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              • #8
                Thanks dado, I LOVE cheese but I have a mucus problem, I'm thinking it's probably the dairy so I'm eliminating it for now, hopefully I can add it back in small amounts later.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dado View Post
                  you can't overdo it on the cheese. on the nuts, yes, you can go too much.
                  I'll disagree with this only because some people can experience inflammation and other... unsavory reactions, when a specific threshold of dairy consumption has been met.

                  NINJA EDIT: Well that was convenient. See above!
                  Are you a college student, trying to navigate college while being Primal? Do you know any other PB college students on a tight budget? Heck, for that matter, are YOU trying to live Primal on a budget? Enroll at Primal University!

                  For after all what is man in nature? A nothing in relation to infinity, all in relation to nothing, a central point between nothing and all and infinitely far from understanding either.
                  -- Blaise Pascal

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                  • #10
                    i forgot about this, this is my mistake.

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                    • #11
                      I try to buy as much organic food as my budget will allow and fill in the rest with whatever is reasonably priced, and as local as possible. Some months I can buy a lot of organic - some months it's none at all. I figure it evens out over time. A little organic is probably better than no organic.

                      Also - ask around your community, get creative, and use word-of-mouth. We discovered that a friend of a friend has a very small local farm where she raises grass-fed beef. She butchers a couple overy fall and is always looking for buyers. We have our first 1/4 share coming in a few weeks for a very good price. Her beef isn't "certified" organic or anything. The way she describes it is "I'm cheap, and I don't pay money to feed them grain when they can get everything they need from being out in the pasture." Her farm is tiny and she only sells through word-of-mouth, which means we're going to get a great price!

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                      • #12
                        Thanks duckmama, more great ideas!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by duckmama View Post
                          Also - ask around your community...
                          I'll second this. Look for any farmer's markets in your area and don't be afraid to just go wander around and look at the offerings or do some price shopping. If you have the time and are comfortable traveling a little further, don't forget to also check nearby areas within reasonable (say, weekly) driving distance for other farmer's markets, or even small farms that sell their wares directly.

                          The season is ending now, but also look for CSAs in the area that you could join next Spring. CSAs are a great way to get a steady (even abundant) supply of seasonal fresh vegetables at a much reduced cost, which may help you in turn afford more and better quality meats.

                          I'm lucky enough to live in an area where we have multiple CSAs available to us. We're finishing up the season for one CSA with a local produce and egg farm, from which we've had a steady supply (going on 25 weeks now) of all kinds of wonderful seasonal veggies to munch on for the price of just five weeks' worth of what we used to buy from the grocery store. To replace that this Winter, we're having produce bundles delivered to our door from a local business that gets all its offerings from local farms and small businesses (which also means seasonal produce — hooray for sweet potatoes!). These also are nominally priced for a HUGE box (plus bumper bag) of produce. Lately this has included cabbage, various winter squash, potatoes, lettuce, eggplant, bell peppers, radishes, pears, and abundant apples.

                          We also participate in an organic free-range whole chicken CSA (who offers grass-fed beef if we desire); that one's a bit more expensive, as good meat tends to be, but at least we know we're getting good quality meat. We're also fortunate in being able to get fresh local dairy and meats and all kinds of other offerings (kefir or lard, anyone?) delivered to our door every week from a local creamery. All of this has led to our "Fridays" turning into our "Food-days", when we get our deliveries and go pick up our shares.

                          Pretty much the only time we have to set foot inside a grocery store is to get cupboard staples like spices and oils, or to get non-local foods like wild fish, olives and nuts. That factor alone saves us countless dollars just from not being tempted to fill our cart with convenience foods and other unnecessary, even harmful, items, not to mention using the gas to drive back and forth to various stores all the time.

                          So do be on the lookout for CSAs and delivery services in your area. Do some research on local offerings and, again, ask around. Availability of such things may of course vary by region and by season, but I'd be willing to bet you could find at least one farmer's market within reasonable driving distance that's open most of the year if not year-round. Oh, and never underestimate the storage and savings capacity of a chest freezer for those occasional to-good-to-be-true, limited-time offers.
                          "Take what a man makes and use it, but do not worship it, for it shall pass."

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                          • #14
                            If you've been eating low-carb consistently for a long period of time, some carbs can help to up-regulate your metabolism. Try replacing fats with non-gluten starches for a day or two, and see what happens.

                            Also, remember that fat is calorically dense. You may want to plug in the numbers and see exactly how much you're eating.
                            “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Velocity View Post
                              I'll disagree with this only because some people can experience inflammation and other... unsavory reactions, when a specific threshold of dairy consumption has been met.
                              True. I can eat up to the equivalent of a cup and a half of dairy a day without problems but get sick if I go much higher.

                              Oh and to the op: You can go grass fed if you want but I find a fish oil pill or a bit of cod liver oil keeps the omegas even. Oh and try pork shoulder roast with the skin on.
                              In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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