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  • #46
    I guess you could call what I am doing Unjobbing. I used to a be professional chef and now I am intentionally not working. In fact I am doing pretty much what I did when was 8 yrs. old. I used to love to look at my mother cook books; she never let me hang out in the kitchen because she was far too busy cooking for our large family. So I just contented myself with dreaming of things I would one day cook. The other thing I always did was make things, dolls with cloths,stuffed animals and puppets. Now I do my crafts and sell them occasionally. I still have a basket with my handcrafts and I am always working on something.

    So after all my education ( I have a BFA) I am back to doing what I did as a child.
    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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    • #47
      My plan so far has been to start schooling for engineering(next week), while continuing working fulltime unless, hopefully, being laid off. Unjobbing actually sounds pretty cool, but would require a solid alternative that I don't seem to have; finding a hustle(legitimate) would be nice.

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      • #48
        Thank you for the heart burgers. They do sound mighty amazing. I wish there were better smilies here. A dripping, bloody heart emoticon would go well here.

        I figure there are degrees of unjobbing. I guess I'm at a very mild stage of it.

        I decided at one point that careerism is stupid. I do go to work 8-5 every day, but it's at a place that is totally not demanding. I am not pushed hard. There are no weekly status meetings, there's no pressure to crush any competition, there are no stupid management bullshit motivational buzzwords bandied about, there are no silly awards given to some lame-ass who comes to work early and leaves late because he hasn't figured out yet that doing that just gets you more work.

        I have consciously decided not to "further" my career. I will learn new things as I need them. The work I do pretty much demands it, and I don't mind because learning is fun for me. But I have absolutely no desire to move up the ladder, to try to make more money or to pursue comforts, status symbols and the illusive security. I value my time more than those things.

        For two years I was paid in wild flowers and I felt like the richest woman in the world. I can't live that way forever, and even wild flowers can be taken for granted. So I do the next best thing which is find a place not too demanding of me, that earns a decent living and hold on to it until I need not work anymore. I use all my vacation now. If only I would get sick more often...
        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Figlio di Moros View Post
          Appalachian Ohio- is that Cincinati, or do you live in a different region?
          Other side. It is the southeastern section of Ohio, plus a fat finger that sticks up along the Ohio borders with W. Va. and PA, along the Ohio River (and a little inland, too). These are the foothills to the Appalachians. Our side (the western side of the mountains) has hills and hollows running in all directions, all jumbled - not those aligned fin- or washboard-like ridge-and-valley systems like the Blue Ridge or Kittatinny.
          I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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          • #50
            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
            I decided at one point that careerism is stupid. I do go to work 8-5 every day, but it's at a place that is totally not demanding. I am not pushed hard. There are no weekly status meetings, there's no pressure to crush any competition, there are no stupid management bullshit motivational buzzwords bandied about, there are no silly awards given to some lame-ass who comes to work early and leaves late because he hasn't figured out yet that doing that just gets you more work.

            I have consciously decided not to "further" my career. I will learn new things as I need them. The work I do pretty much demands it, and I don't mind because learning is fun for me. But I have absolutely no desire to move up the ladder, to try to make more money or to pursue comforts, status symbols and the illusive security. I value my time more than those things.
            I think you have the right idea. I am trying to be in the same place as you, although I am still the main breadwinner for my family.

            Work is important and relevant, but ultimately less important than your quality of life.
            Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

            Griff's cholesterol primer
            5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
            Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
            TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
            bloodorchid is always right

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
              Other side. It is the southeastern section of Ohio, plus a fat finger that sticks up along the Ohio borders with W. Va. and PA, along the Ohio River (and a little inland, too). These are the foothills to the Appalachians. Our side (the western side of the mountains) has hills and hollows running in all directions, all jumbled - not those aligned fin- or washboard-like ridge-and-valley systems like the Blue Ridge or Kittatinny.
              Sounds beautiful- though, it explains why no-one ever's been there or discussed the area.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
                I think you have the right idea. I am trying to be in the same place as you, although I am still the main breadwinner for my family.

                Work is important and relevant, but ultimately less important than your quality of life.
                Yeah, balancing the quality of life thing and paying the necessary bills...

                I'm not trying to bait any political discussions, but I did learn about a better quality of life during my sojourn in Europe. Where I was, stores and most businesses closed at 18.00 M thru F. Sat it was until noon. Sunday - forget it. You had to go to an international travel hub (plane, train) for late-night shops. For the low-level work I did I got 4 weeks paid vacation in the first year there. (Mind you, the rest of the year I was their slave and worked like a dog, so I feel that I didn't mooch.) Hubby and I still argue relentlessly about work vs. life. (Well, "debate, and sometimes strenously" would be a better description.)

                My experience of life up until that point had been simply study or work, preferably simultaneously, until you drop dead. Nothing more. When I saw a society that VALUED off time as NECESSARY for a holistic state of HEALTH... WHOOOOAAAAAA!
                I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                  Thank you for the heart burgers. They do sound mighty amazing. I wish there were better smilies here. A dripping, bloody heart emoticon would go well here.

                  I figure there are degrees of unjobbing. I guess I'm at a very mild stage of it.

                  I decided at one point that careerism is stupid. I do go to work 8-5 every day, but it's at a place that is totally not demanding. I am not pushed hard. There are no weekly status meetings, there's no pressure to crush any competition, there are no stupid management bullshit motivational buzzwords bandied about, there are no silly awards given to some lame-ass who comes to work early and leaves late because he hasn't figured out yet that doing that just gets you more work.

                  I have consciously decided not to "further" my career. I will learn new things as I need them. The work I do pretty much demands it, and I don't mind because learning is fun for me. But I have absolutely no desire to move up the ladder, to try to make more money or to pursue comforts, status symbols and the illusive security. I value my time more than those things.

                  For two years I was paid in wild flowers and I felt like the richest woman in the world. I can't live that way forever, and even wild flowers can be taken for granted. So I do the next best thing which is find a place not too demanding of me, that earns a decent living and hold on to it until I need not work anymore. I use all my vacation now. If only I would get sick more often...
                  I really like this "unjobbing" concept. I'm going to do a bit more reading. In some ways, I think I have been doing it a little bit. I am in a fairly competitive area of scientific research where people think long hours and high stress are the only way to go. I have an autoimmune disease and very little energy so I never figured I could compete. Oddly enough, I'm still plodding along in my field even though I work way less hours than my colleagues. When I interview, I am honest and tell them I don't work as many hours as everyone else. Some how I am still getting good jobs and publishing decent papers - I am sure I would be more successful if I worked more, but this is how it goes for me.

                  Does that count as un-jobbing?
                  Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                  http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Figlio di Moros View Post
                    Sounds beautiful- though, it explains why no-one ever's been there or discussed the area.
                    That's because it is also full of rednecks, a lot of poverty, meh schooling, and not much development (for a whole host of historical reasons). But - the locals NEED their open spaces because many still want to hold onto the family property or farm that frequently dates back to statehood, and they often farm late nights right along with a full-time day job (so as to pay the bills) in order to do so. They just need better things to raise...

                    With my being Primal, I am starting to get the tingly cold showers that I may be onto something here. This area is classed as mixed-mesophytic forest, which would be absolutely freakin' perfect for the best forest-raised pork...
                    Last edited by Crabbcakes; 06-26-2012, 02:03 PM.
                    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                    • #55
                      "Forest-raised"- like wild? Sounds like an interesting idea; certainly worth pursuing, could be a good way to unjob. Still need to find my own plan.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                        Unjobbing.
                        http://www.whywork.org/about/feature...unjobbing.html

                        Be careful. This website has dangerous information. It might lead one to quit their corporate status job and go for a really long walk in the wilderness or something.
                        Why Work? // Index
                        So far, the site seems douchey and unrealistic. Then again, it's still covering primers, and not focused on "how an unjobbed economy would work", or even how to pursue unjobbing personally.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                          My husband and I are the proud owners of 25 acres (10.1 hectare) of wooded land way out in the middle of nowhere, and our favorite place to study is - outdoors. I myself believe wholeheartedly that humans get crazy when they lose the contact to Nature. You don't have to actually worship trees - just climb them a lot, you know?

                          And just off-topic: I have been to Amsterdam, stayed in a youth hostel in the countryside, and what I wouldn't give for some more fresh caramel stroopwafel!!!
                          O my that sounds lovely! When you are so closely located to wooded land (and even own it), by any means use it and spend time there with your kids. I can see how that is an educational and healthy learning environment.

                          ETA: Funny that you mentioned stroopwafels! They are my unprimal indulge as one of my relatives bakes and sells them on the market. I can send you some

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                          • #58
                            Hey, looks like I'm unjobbing as well as unschooling, I have a science degree and trained to be a science teacher, now I work very part-time as a handy-man. The teacher training was what finally convinced me to unschool and unjob. I wasn't going to give up seeing my kids grow up for a job. You can live on very little money if you choose to give up stuff. Hopefully soon we'll sell the house and buy some land to raise meat and grow veggies and live illegally on it
                            You know all those pictures of Adam and Eve where they have belly button? Think about it..................... take as long as you need........................

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                            • #59
                              Shbikes, another beefy heart from me! Although i am in Europe and on average do not 'need' to work as hard as you in the US, i did have 2 almost fulltime jobs untill recently.. (the labour market, except for Germany, is not doing well at all, unemployment sky rocketing). I Could only cope the last years with the unjobbing mindset!! Now i made some radical decisions and want to approach my new job position like you described

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Tribal Rob View Post
                                ...I have a science degree and trained to be a science teacher, now I work very part-time as a handy-man. The teacher training was what finally convinced me to unschool and unjob.
                                I would like to hear how the teacher training is involved in your story. What were the sticking points that made you ditch teaching?
                                I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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