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Is bouillon acceptable while fasting?

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  • Is bouillon acceptable while fasting?

    Just curious. I know, it's not 100% primal. But I'm not a fan of coffee, and I heard that a glass of bouillon can help curve hunger. I IF normally for 19 - 20 hours, and have done great so far. But will drinking a glass of bouillon disrupt my fast?

  • #2
    I guess so, but it's full of salt and "stuff". It would be preferable to make your own bone broth and drink that IMHO. Personally I like peppermint tea, homegrown if I can.

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    • #3
      What do you mean by bouillon? At it's basic meaning, bouillon is nothing more than broth. But it seems in the US it tends to refer to those little cubes that we drop in hot water to make insta-broth. What's in those things? I'd worry about those things be more processed than desirable.

      I have no thoughts on drinking broth as a part of the fast. There seem to be more different types of fasts and opinions about fasting than there are members on the forum. It seems counter to the concept to me as you would be essentially adding calories and nutrients to your body via the broth - but I really haven't figured out fasting yet. I am curious why you want to include bouillon in your fast?
      My primal journal that I don't update enough:
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

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      • #4
        Maybe you could find a better version but here are the ingredients for Knorr beef bouillon, which is the brand I see in the store most often:

        Ingredients

        Salt, monosodium glutamate, hydrolyzed soy/corn/wheat gluten protein, hydrogenated cottonseed oil, beef fat, dehydrated vegetables (onions, carrots, parsley), beef extract, water, guar gum, colour, autolyzed yeast extract, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, spices, tartaric acid, citric acid, hydrogenated soybean oil and sulphites. May contain traces of milk ingredients.

        Holy moly.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by girlarchitect View Post
          What do you mean by bouillon? At it's basic meaning, bouillon is nothing more than broth. But it seems in the US it tends to refer to those little cubes that we drop in hot water to make insta-broth. What's in those things? I'd worry about those things be more processed than desirable.

          I have no thoughts on drinking broth as a part of the fast. There seem to be more different types of fasts and opinions about fasting than there are members on the forum. It seems counter to the concept to me as you would be essentially adding calories and nutrients to your body via the broth - but I really haven't figured out fasting yet. I am curious why you want to include bouillon in your fast?
          sorry, that is what I am referring to or the carton of chicken broth. The one I have currently is 5 calories and 1g carbs.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by erikJ View Post
            I guess so, but it's full of salt and "stuff". It would be preferable to make your own bone broth and drink that IMHO. Personally I like peppermint tea, homegrown if I can.
            I do like tea. I used to be a sweet tea drinker, and trying to convert to just tea... and peppermint may work but never seem to find one with enough flavor it in I guess.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DaisyEater View Post
              Maybe you could find a better version but here are the ingredients for Knorr beef bouillon, which is the brand I see in the store most often:

              Ingredients

              Salt, monosodium glutamate, hydrolyzed soy/corn/wheat gluten protein, hydrogenated cottonseed oil, beef fat, dehydrated vegetables (onions, carrots, parsley), beef extract, water, guar gum, colour, autolyzed yeast extract, disodium guanylate, disodium inosinate, spices, tartaric acid, citric acid, hydrogenated soybean oil and sulphites. May contain traces of milk ingredients.

              Holy moly.
              You are correct, unless I make some on my own, which I barely have time to cook these days it does have a lot of junk in it. Oh well, I tried. I do drink water but was looking for something with a little flavor.

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              • #8
                Getting some good loose leaf tea, especially one like Jasmine or other additional flavorings, can add a lot of flavor with no sweetener. (Not to mention a bunch of health benefits!) It may take some getting used to, but after your taste buds adjust you could find yourself hooked. Adagio Teas, which ships online for a reasonable price, has a pretty good selection.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ErikI View Post
                  Getting some good loose leaf tea, especially one like Jasmine or other additional flavorings, can add a lot of flavor with no sweetener. (Not to mention a bunch of health benefits!) It may take some getting used to, but after your taste buds adjust you could find yourself hooked. Adagio Teas, which ships online for a reasonable price, has a pretty good selection.
                  So instead of tea bags, you just put the whole leaves in the water?
                  Last edited by croí; 08-01-2011, 09:31 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Well by definition if you're taking in calories you aren't really fasting.

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                    • #11
                      There are many ways to brew loose leaf tea. Tea Balls, if you can find one, are convenient and there are other such contraptions. Essentially you put the desired amount of tea leaves into the device, drop it in to the water to steep for the desired time, and then remove it. (Think of them as refillable steel tea bags.) Depending on how strong you like your tea, I suppose you could add it directly. Adagio also offers their crazy pitcher device, where you add the tea leaves directly to the water, let it steep, and then the bottom sort of "opens up" and filters the water through, leaving you with just the tea and no leaves.

                      Loose leaf tea is slightly more complicated, but its not horribly so. (The health benefits of consuming whole leaf vs tea bags should be astronomically greater. Tea bags have often mashed up the leaves beyond recognition, and I recall reading you lose some of the antioxidants in the processing as well as a significant amount of L-theanine. For most health benefits, drink green and white varieties. Though I suspect you get still quite a good amount from whole black and oolong.)

                      The main thing that you have to concern yourself with, and this goes with tea bags as well, is not burning the leaves. Only black teas are capable of handling boiling water. Green and white, you should use water 160-180 degrees. (Just take the water off the fire when you see the tiny bubbles forming at the bottom and pre-boiling.) 2-4 minutes steep time for green and white as well, which is how long you keep the leaves in the water. (Leaves can get overpowering fast.) I forget the time for black tea, as I never drink it. Adagio prints steep time and temperature on the shipped leaves though, as well as measurement of tea to add I think. (Usually you use 1 teaspoon of tea per 8 oz.) Experimenting with temperature, time, and quantity can also be very useful, if you have the time/inkling to do such a thing. They have a sampler package if you're curious.

                      Also, to make it easier on your wallet, and for even better flavors you can reuse leaves you've already steeped with. (Some people suggest even better health benefits.) I've reused leaves 3-5 times in a day, always with just as much flavor. You can make one order last for quite a long time this way.

                      Adagio has a guide
                      Adagio Teas - What is Tea?
                      if you want to read some more.

                      EDIT:
                      The standard comparison: loose leaf tea is to tea bags, as coffee beans is to instant coffee.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marqueemoon View Post
                        Well by definition if you're taking in calories you aren't really fasting.
                        yes, but coffee has calories, correct? And this is usually alotted during a fast

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by croí View Post
                          yes, but coffee has calories, correct? And this is usually alotted during a fast
                          No, black coffee is calorie free.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ErikI View Post
                            There are many ways to brew loose leaf tea. Tea Balls, if you can find one, are convenient and there are other such contraptions. Essentially you put the desired amount of tea leaves into the device, drop it in to the water to steep for the desired time, and then remove it. (Think of them as refillable steel tea bags.) Depending on how strong you like your tea, I suppose you could add it directly. Adagio also offers their crazy pitcher device, where you add the tea leaves directly to the water, let it steep, and then the bottom sort of "opens up" and filters the water through, leaving you with just the tea and no leaves.

                            Loose leaf tea is slightly more complicated, but its not horribly so. (The health benefits of consuming whole leaf vs tea bags should be astronomically greater. Tea bags have often mashed up the leaves beyond recognition, and I recall reading you lose some of the antioxidants in the processing as well as a significant amount of L-theanine. For most health benefits, drink green and white varieties. Though I suspect you get still quite a good amount from whole black and oolong.)

                            The main thing that you have to concern yourself with, and this goes with tea bags as well, is not burning the leaves. Only black teas are capable of handling boiling water. Green and white, you should use water 160-180 degrees. (Just take the water off the fire when you see the tiny bubbles forming at the bottom and pre-boiling.) 2-4 minutes steep time for green and white as well, which is how long you keep the leaves in the water. (Leaves can get overpowering fast.) I forget the time for black tea, as I never drink it. Adagio prints steep time and temperature on the shipped leaves though, as well as measurement of tea to add I think. (Usually you use 1 teaspoon of tea per 8 oz.) Experimenting with temperature, time, and quantity can also be very useful, if you have the time/inkling to do such a thing. They have a sampler package if you're curious.

                            Also, to make it easier on your wallet, and for even better flavors you can reuse leaves you've already steeped with. (Some people suggest even better health benefits.) I've reused leaves 3-5 times in a day, always with just as much flavor. You can make one order last for quite a long time this way.

                            Adagio has a guide
                            Adagio Teas - What is Tea?
                            if you want to read some more.

                            EDIT:
                            The standard comparison: loose leaf tea is to tea bags, as coffee beans is to instant coffee.
                            Oh now I see. It's a wonderful idea.. however I have no desire to take the time to prepare this. Call me lazy, but I really wouldn't want to.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No I understand. It can be quite an undertaking when one gets it started. Its an entirely new routine to get into. One more note, pyramid tea bags are generally considered more flavorful and have larger leaf pieces, and can be used with much more ease than loose leaf.

                              I wish you luck in your fasting!

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