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  • Questions about Whisk(e)y

    How does the fermentation/distillation process act on the gluten?
    Starting Date: Dec 18, 2010
    Starting Weight: 294 pounds
    Current Weight: 235 pounds
    Goal Weight: 195 pounds

  • #2
    It's my understanding that the distillation process removes the gluten and that whiskey is gluten free. At least, I believe this is what many experts in celiac disease have concluded.

    I'm hoping no one will contradict me on this one - I'd hate to loose my scotch.
    My primal journal that I don't update enough:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

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    • #3
      Originally posted by girlarchitect View Post
      It's my understanding that the distillation process removes the gluten and that whiskey is gluten free. At least, I believe this is what many experts in celiac disease have concluded.

      I'm hoping no one will contradict me on this one - I'd hate to loose my scotch.
      That seems to be the conclusion. When it's distilled the gluten molecules get left behind. Fermentation on the other hand does very little, so (barley or wheat based) beer is not celiac-safe.

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      • #4
        I recently recieved a bottle of Blanton's single barrel Bourbon whiskey as a gift. ( my 50th Bday) I must say it is the best I have ever tasted!!!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by brighthorse View Post
          I recently recieved a bottle of Blanton's single barrel Bourbon whiskey as a gift. ( my 50th Bday) I must say it is the best I have ever tasted!!!
          Anyone bringing me a scotch or bourbon on my birthday is my new best friend.
          My primal journal that I don't update enough:
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

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          • #6
            The Alcohol in the Hooch does more damage than any minor amount of gluten if it there in minor doses. I think it's a misguided target.

            That being said, I would probably still drink Maker's Mark if it was made by enslaved Choctaws out of refined fiberglass I love it so much. I guess it could be said that I have a bias.
            Every Day is a New Adventure

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            • #7
              Originally posted by New Renaissance View Post
              The Alcohol in the Hooch does more damage than any minor amount of gluten if it there in minor doses. I think it's a misguided target.

              That being said, I would probably still drink Maker's Mark if it was made by enslaved Choctaws out of refined fiberglass I love it so much. I guess it could be said that I have a bias.
              Alcohol doesn't give me an instant headache and upset my stomach though
              Starting Date: Dec 18, 2010
              Starting Weight: 294 pounds
              Current Weight: 235 pounds
              Goal Weight: 195 pounds

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              • #8
                Beer makes me feel like ass too.
                Every Day is a New Adventure

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                • #9
                  Whisky should, theoretically be gluten free, but some of the cheap blends have colouring put in which contains gluten! So the answer my coeliac husband found was to only drink single malt!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oliviascotland View Post
                    Whisky should, theoretically be gluten free, but some of the cheap blends have colouring put in which contains gluten! So the answer my coeliac husband found was to only drink single malt!
                    Define cheap blends, your and my opinion of cheap might be world's apart

                    much like our language barrier
                    Last edited by kenn; 08-01-2011, 05:56 AM.
                    Starting Date: Dec 18, 2010
                    Starting Weight: 294 pounds
                    Current Weight: 235 pounds
                    Goal Weight: 195 pounds

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kenn,
                      An example of an inexpensive not single malt scotch might be Famous Grouse - which is my house scotch. They do add something called spirit carmel to the blend for consistency in color. My sense is the amount of gluten from this is minimal but with gluten allergies might find the 'minimal' claims less than reassuring at best.
                      My primal journal that I don't update enough:
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33293.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by New Renaissance View Post
                        The Alcohol in the Hooch does more damage than any minor amount of gluten if it there in minor doses. I think it's a misguided target.

                        That being said, I would probably still drink Maker's Mark if it was made by enslaved Choctaws out of refined fiberglass I love it so much. I guess it could be said that I have a bias.
                        mmmm my favorite Bourbon, although I was called a heathen for prefering it over Scotch by a friend of Scottish decent.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by girlarchitect View Post
                          Kenn,
                          An example of an inexpensive not single malt scotch might be Famous Grouse
                          Actually, that's a "blended"—meaning it does contain some malt whisky (to give it character) but that's mixed with cheaper "grain whisky". I hadn't known they added colour to it—I guess the colouring must be made from burnt grain if there's gluten in it.

                          A reasonably widely available and cheap Scotch malt whisky? Glenffidich. But anything that actually says "single malt" on the label. It'll also give the number of years for which it has been aged—"12 year old" or whatever.

                          i doubt any malt whisky would have colouring added, because I don't think they'd need to. The colour comes from storing the spirit in oak barrels and you have to do that for a considerable length of time with malt whisky. Otherwise it would't be safe to drink. Malt whisky has a lot of congeners in it—which is why it tastes more interesting but which also makes it more dangerous if it does't go through a lengthy ageing process during which some of the more harmful ones break down.

                          Irish whiskeys come as blended or malt whiskey also. Jamesons says their is gluten-free, though I take it they mean all their whiskeys, ordinary as well as malt. What they say–which may not be very comforting—is that the distillation process leaves the gluten behind but that they don't use any gluten-containing grains anyway. i say "not comforting" because either they don't use barley (as Irish whisky should) or they don't actually know that barley contains gluten (so what is any statement they make about gluten worth?).

                          I don't know about American whiskeys, but this site says that one called Maker's Mark is gluten-free:

                          Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                            Actually, that's a "blended"—meaning it does contain some malt whisky (to give it character) but that's mixed with cheaper "grain whisky". I hadn't known they added colour to it—I guess the colouring must be made from burnt grain if there's gluten in it.

                            A reasonably widely available and cheap Scotch malt whisky? Glenffidich. But anything that actually says "single malt" on the label. It'll also give the number of years for which it has been aged—"12 year old" or whatever.

                            i doubt any malt whisky would have colouring added, because I don't think they'd need to. The colour comes from storing the spirit in oak barrels and you have to do that for a considerable length of time with malt whisky. Otherwise it would't be safe to drink. Malt whisky has a lot of congeners in it—which is why it tastes more interesting but which also makes it more dangerous if it does't go through a lengthy ageing process during which some of the more harmful ones break down.

                            Irish whiskeys come as blended or malt whiskey also. Jamesons says their is gluten-free, though I take it they mean all their whiskeys, ordinary as well as malt. What they say–which may not be very comforting—is that the distillation process leaves the gluten behind but that they don't use any gluten-containing grains anyway. i say "not comforting" because either they don't use barley (as Irish whisky should) or they don't actually know that barley contains gluten (so what is any statement they make about gluten worth?).

                            I don't know about American whiskeys, but this site says that one called Maker's Mark is gluten-free:

                            Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages
                            When cooking off the mash, the still is kept at 173 degrees Fahrenheit - too low for most water evaporation (obviously SOME comes through), and slightly above alcohol's boiling point - if gluten can survive the heat AND bind to alcohol molecules, I'd be surprised. Besides that, NO one keeps the initial alcohol that condenses, which is where any pollutants would show up. Heads and tails of spirits are thrown away - the head (initial alcohol condensation) typically contains methanol, which is obviously poisonous (you can tell by the smell alone) and the tails contain some of the congeners previously mentioned - some are harmful, some just make the spirit taste bad.

                            I take it no one here has built a pot still? Amusingly enough, we did it in high school science class as an experiment to extract ethanol for fuel use (I lived in central Illinois at the time - there was plenty of corn.) The lawn mower engine we ran it in burned up (as do most gasoline engines run on 100% ethanol) but it worked.
                            Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
                            Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
                            Current weight: 210.8 lbs
                            Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

                            The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
                            ChooseMyPlate

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by kenn View Post
                              Define cheap blends, your and my opinion of cheap might be world's apart

                              much like our language barrier
                              Famous Grouse, Baillie Nicholl Jarvie, Bells, Whyte & MacKay - that type of blended whisky (bearing in mind that I live in Scotland, in prime Scotch producing territory!) - my whisky of choice would be a Bunnahabhain, or maybe a Laphroig or Bowmore or Balvenie (preferably a double wood) - but it's easier to get hold of them in Scotland than it is in the US, and somewhat cheaper - not that they're cheap, mind - too!

                              Some of the bottles we have in our cupboard are 10 years old .... sad, really ....

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