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Corn blight affecting dairy farmers! When will they learn?!

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  • Corn blight affecting dairy farmers! When will they learn?!

    Management tips to avoid northern corn leaf blight
    If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

    Originally posted by tfarny
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

  • #2
    not sure what point you're making.. the cows need to eat *something*

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    • #3
      I don't see a problem with feeding cattle silage. In fact, in northern climates, they need a large quantity of roughage to produce enough body heat not to freeze... Ground grain, on the other hand, is less good.

      In case you're a city dweller, and have no idea what I'm talking about:
      Silage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
      Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
      Current weight: 210.8 lbs
      Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

      The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
      ChooseMyPlate

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      • #4
        Taking delight in their problems isn't going to help...
        I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Nion View Post
          Taking delight in their problems isn't going to help...
          If that was aimed at me, I'm not taking delight in anything. I just think it would be better all round if the cattle were freely grazing in open grasslands rather than being fed corn (silage or otherwise).
          If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

          Originally posted by tfarny
          If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by keithpowers View Post
            I don't see a problem with feeding cattle silage. In fact, in northern climates, they need a large quantity of roughage to produce enough body heat not to freeze... Ground grain, on the other hand, is less good.

            In case you're a city dweller, and have no idea what I'm talking about:
            Silage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
            Yeah, you've got me keithpowers. I'll put my hand up and admit it. I only quickly scanned through through some of the article (naught naughty, but it was late and I was tired and lazy) and hadn't actually twigged that they were talking about feeding silage made from the foliage, rather than the ground grain itself.

            Question: Would cattle graise their way through a corn field if given the option? I don't know the answer (I'm a city dweller after all), but I've only ever seen cows eating grass (on the very rare occasions I leave the confines of my city and actually see them running free in fields.... oh, hang on, here that's only a 20 min drive from the city centre in practically any direction ) or whatever is served up to them in a trough (yes I understand this could be silage made from a number of sources). I guess they might in winter when grass could be scarce.

            Maybe we've got a friendly corn farmer on here who's had problems with cattle breaking into their corn fields for a quick snack who can give us the answer

            Ok, I'll go back to the naughty corner now
            If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

            Originally posted by tfarny
            If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

            Comment


            • #7
              Corn is not a food. No amount of rationalization will change that. Even 'natural' corn is a man-made frankenfood.
              Tayatha om bekandze

              Bekandze maha bekandze

              Randza samu gate soha

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by periquin View Post
                Corn is not a food. No amount of rationalization will change that. Even 'natural' corn is a man-made frankenfood.
                This is true, but there's very little of the grain present in most silage... it is usually cut when the ears are small enough to have just started forming cobs. They look like baby corn for stir fry, only smaller and with no grains formed.

                I do recall my uncle did, on occasion, let his corn get too mature before he cut it, and ended up with grain in the chopped silage mix.
                Your mileage may vary.
                Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
                Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
                Current weight: 210.8 lbs
                Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

                The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
                ChooseMyPlate

                Comment


                • #9
                  I remember thinking that the best part of silage was what dripped out the bottom of the silo. Long ago. Long, long ago. Of course after I reached 21 I got some different ideas.
                  Tayatha om bekandze

                  Bekandze maha bekandze

                  Randza samu gate soha

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mikeyt View Post
                    not sure what point you're making.. the cows need to eat *something*
                    let them eat cake!
                    Primal Chaos
                    37yo 6'5"
                    6-19-2011 393lbs 60" waist
                    current 338lbs 49" waist
                    goal 240lbs 35" waist

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                    • #11
                      I gotta say, the dairy farmers have it VERY rough. A friend of mine spent a summer as his extended family's dairy farm and wrote a play partially based on the experience (I'm acting in it, it's in the New York Fringe Festival, Cow Play if anyone's in NY and interested in a, seriously, DAMN good play). He showed us a lot of his pictures and explained the whole situation as related to him by his family.

                      As he put it, the whole industry is about who can make the most milk the quickest, and whoever is able to do that gets the contract and if you can't do that you just don't get any business at all (yes, I understand it is different for farmers who are able to successfully label themselves as organic, pasture-fed, or whatever else, but honestly it's a niche market overall). These farmers LOVE their cows, really, it's just the situation. My friend told me about a guy who had to snip the calves' tails off to help stop the spread of disease. It broke this man's heart everytime he hurt these baby cows, but he HAD to do it because, given the circumstances, it would be best for the cows. Another man has to shoot the cows that have become infected with disease (one of the many reasons the cows are given various hormones) and again, it was because he deeply hated to see the cows suffer.

                      Bottom line: the farmers almost always wish they could run things differently--they truly care for the cows, as anyone would care for a living creature they interacted so closely with. It's a lose-lose situation, and the farmers are forced to play it. The market, if it's at all possible, needs to change.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Will Turner View Post
                        I gotta say, the dairy farmers have it VERY rough. A friend of mine spent a summer as his extended family's dairy farm and wrote a play partially based on the experience (I'm acting in it, it's in the New York Fringe Festival, Cow Play if anyone's in NY and interested in a, seriously, DAMN good play). He showed us a lot of his pictures and explained the whole situation as related to him by his family.

                        As he put it, the whole industry is about who can make the most milk the quickest, and whoever is able to do that gets the contract and if you can't do that you just don't get any business at all (yes, I understand it is different for farmers who are able to successfully label themselves as organic, pasture-fed, or whatever else, but honestly it's a niche market overall). These farmers LOVE their cows, really, it's just the situation. My friend told me about a guy who had to snip the calves' tails off to help stop the spread of disease. It broke this man's heart everytime he hurt these baby cows, but he HAD to do it because, given the circumstances, it would be best for the cows. Another man has to shoot the cows that have become infected with disease (one of the many reasons the cows are given various hormones) and again, it was because he deeply hated to see the cows suffer.

                        Bottom line: the farmers almost always wish they could run things differently--they truly care for the cows, as anyone would care for a living creature they interacted so closely with. It's a lose-lose situation, and the farmers are forced to play it. The market, if it's at all possible, needs to change.

                        This, quoted for truth. And if every animal rights loon was forced to work a farm for a month, I'd imagine there would be a lot fewer of them (and that's assuming they didn't die from malnutrition doing farm labor on a vegan diet).
                        Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
                        Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
                        Current weight: 210.8 lbs
                        Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

                        The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
                        ChooseMyPlate

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Corn is in the grass family thus makes for a food for cows and other grazing animals. A problem that many farmers have is critters getting into their fields and causing damage. Deer are a big problem. Heck, some farmers in Wisconsin wanted to put a hunting season on Sandhill Cranes because of the damage that they can do to a corn field. I see Sandhills and deer regularly in the corn and soybean fields in N Illinois and S Wisconsin. The farmers are comfortable growing corn for silage although other grass may be better for them. Years ago, when the prairie was still abundant, they were regularly harvested for silage. Today, I happened to have a conversation with a horse person (who happens to be a conservationist) who said that she would love to have bluestem grass hay for her critters. Unfortunately, we've destroyed most of the bluestem prairies and now have to rely on corn and other substitutes to feed our grazing animals.
                          There are farmers and ranchers that have grass/pasture fed critters and it is well worth the time and cost for us to find them and support them.
                          Last edited by Mike Schutz; 07-20-2011, 06:37 PM. Reason: spelling

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Schutz View Post
                            Corn is in the grass family thus makes for a food for cows and other grazing animals. A problem that many farmers have is critters getting into their fields and causing damage. Deer are a big problem. Heck, some farmers in Wisconsin wanted to put a hunting season on Sandhill Cranes because of the damage that they can do to a corn field. I see Sandhills and deer regularly in the corn and soybean fields in N Illinois and S Wisconsin. The farmers are comfortable growing corn for silage although other grass may be better for them. Years ago, when the prairie was still abundant, they were regularly harvested for silage. Today, I happened to have a conversation with a horse person (who happens to be a conservationist) who said that she would love to have bluestem grass hay for her critters. Unfortunately, we've destroyed most of the bluestem prairies and now have to rely on corn and other substitutes to feed our grazing animals.
                            There are farmers and ranchers that have grass/pasture fed critters and it is well worth the time and cost for us to find them and support them.
                            Ah, you live far to the north of my former home in Illinois (in the countryside outside a tiny village named Tower Hill, in central downstate).
                            You can't escape the cornfields there. That's the vast majority of what's there.
                            For Reference:
                            TowerHill-Satell&#105.jpg
                            TowerHill-LakeZur.jpg
                            Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
                            Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
                            Current weight: 210.8 lbs
                            Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

                            The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
                            ChooseMyPlate

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=keithpowers;515002]Ah, you live far to the north of my former home in Illinois (in the countryside outside a tiny village named Tower Hill, in central downstate).
                              You can't escape the cornfields there. That's the vast majority of what's there.
                              For Reference:

                              Have you ever noticed that anyplace in IL outside of the Chicago Metro area is considered "Down State"? The closest I've ever been to Tower Hill was Springfield (the tourist thing).
                              The Midwest is almost all Factory Farms now specializing in corn and soybeans, most of that engineered by Cargil and the other big companies. Fortunately, there are a few more organic farms starting to pop up. You have to hunt down the good stuff like Grok. This past weekend we hunted down some wonderful pasture raised lamb fro N Dakota at Whole Foods and during the week, I hunt down some organic vegies at the local farmers markets that are popping up. Unfortunately, the days of 160 acre farms with a dozen head of dairy cows and a bunch of chickens and pigs running in the yard are all but gone. You can still find some in WI because the topography isn't conducive to large farms.

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