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  • Cast iron pans

    Just got 6 cast iron pans! 3 x saucepans, with lids, 3 x frying pans (skillets), no lids. All have wooden handles - which unscrew, thankfully, for seasoning purposes! I want to season them with lard, not oil - there was a long thread on here some time ago about seasoning cast iron - any links to it?

    The surface of the pans is not smooth like the one I have already, but slightly textured - a bit like sand. I a, sure that they will season to be non - stick though. They are all slightly rusted but not badly so. Really looking forward to using them!

  • #2
    First thing, get a wire scrubber and remove all the rust.

    Heat slightly and coat with lard. Place them in the oven upside down, with foil or a cookie sheet below to catch any drips. Heat at 450-500 degrees for 30 minutes. Let them cool to room temperature in the oven. Do this 3-4 more times and you should have a nice non-stick coating.

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    • #3
      I got a set of cast iron pans off eBay that were pretty cruddy and rusty but otherwise sound (and I got them for next to nothing). I followed these instructions and got them shiny and black: How to Clean and Season Cast Iron

      I used rendered bacon fat instead of the three or four different oils she used and they still came out nice.
      See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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      • #4
        There have been several threads on seasoning cast iron. Here is a recent(ish) one.

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        • #5
          Diana, thanks for the upvote for lard! I no way want to use flax oil - lard appeals to me much more! I shall do this over a period of time and look forward to having 6 lovely, non stick pans!

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          • #6
            The last word on cast iron seasoning: Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To
            Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by IvyBlue View Post
              The last word on cast iron seasoning: Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To
              I did that a few months ago and was happy with it.. initially, then it started to flake off just like everything else I have used. I do not know what I am doing wrong.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by trapperjohnme
                I did that a few months ago and was happy with it.. initially, then it started to flake off just like everything else I have used. I do not know what I am doing wrong.
                Seasoning is not a one-time thing. It is ongoing. The right kind of cooking can keep a pan seasoned, but sauteing veggies (particularly mushrooms, onions, and peppers), releases water into the pan and water is the enemy of seasoning. Likewise if you rinse your pans you can expect your prior seasoning to eventually (if not immediately) come undone.

                I wipe mine out while they're still hot.

                If the mess is particularly brutal, I put them back on to burn and then wipe them out. Even so, I tend to season my cast iron about 3 times a year.
                Last edited by brahnamin; 07-05-2011, 07:46 AM. Reason: to add quote

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brahnamin View Post
                  Seasoning is not a one-time thing. It is ongoing. The right kind of cooking can keep a pan seasoned, but sauteing veggies (particularly mushrooms, onions, and peppers), releases water into the pan and water is the enemy of seasoning. Likewise if you rinse your pans you can expect your prior seasoning to eventually (if not immediately) come undone.

                  I wipe mine out while they're still hot.



                  If the mess is particularly brutal, I put them back on to burn and then wipe them out. Even so, I tend to season my cast iron about 3 times a year.

                  Do you mean that you heat them until the gunge has actually burned away / carbonised and can just be sort of brushed off?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                    Do you mean that you heat them until the gunge has actually burned away / carbonised and can just be sort of brushed off?
                    Till it burns dry and can be flaked off without undue scrubbing (since scrubbing, of course, would pretty much necessitate immediate reseasoning)

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