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Eating Around the World

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  • Eating Around the World

    My boyfriend and I went to a Cambodian restaurant the other night for dinner. While we were waiting for our food, a woman came in with her two daughters (who seemed to be around 10 or 11 years old - I'm lousy at guessing kids' ages!). They had a huge world atlas in tow.

    I overheard them explaining to the gentleman at the next table that they were "eating around the world" and had made it to "C" in the alphabet. How totally cool, and what a great experience for these girls. They seemed to have an open mind about ordering a variety of dishes (they didn't even blink an eye when mom ordered frog legs, just asked her if she'd had them before). Of course, it helps that the Bay Area has a huge variety of types of cuisine available; I guess if they can't find a restaurant they can try cooking something at home.

    It got me to thinking about various cuisines and primal/paleo eating - I'm thinking it could be fun to share some of the cuisines we've tried that lend themselves fairly well to eating primally - and having more adventures.

    Cambodian was great - lots of curries, stir-fry dishes, or dishes with just meat & veggies. I had a broth-based soup with fish, prawns, veggies, and pineapple that was delicious.

    Thai - curries are usually a great option; some stir-fries are good.

    Indian - tandoori, curries, butter chicken .... mmmm
    "Sometimes, you need to make sure the angel on your shoulder has a wingman." -Me

    My primal log


  • #2
    I so want to do that with my kids now! You know... when I have kids... eventually...


    Crap! I'm An Adult!

    My Primal Journal

    http://badquaker.com <--- podcast I'm a part of. Check it out if you like anarchy, geekiness and random ramblings.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CoyoteVick View Post
      I so want to do that with my kids now! You know... when I have kids... eventually...
      I'd definitely do it if I had kids. I think the fact that I lived in Greece as a kid (age 5 to 8) did wonders to open me up to a wider variety of foods. My parents had a rule that you had to try everything at least once ... if you decided then that you didn't like it you could look for an alternative. But my brother and I ended up liking a lot of the food over there.

      Oh yeah, Greek food can be awesomely primal!
      "Sometimes, you need to make sure the angel on your shoulder has a wingman." -Me

      My primal log

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      • #4
        I love Cambodian food. When I was pregnant with my oldest 13 years ago, I used to work with a Cambodian woman who everyday would bring in something new for me and yes, I ate it even if I had no clue what it was. All so delicious. I miss that.
        Georgette

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        • #5
          Such a Bay Area thing to do! (And a great geography lesson, to boot <----- says the geography geek!)

          I wonder what their "A" and "B" cuisine was?
          "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

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          • #6
            There is a blogger, an expert cook, on AllRecipes.com who will select one country's cuisine and makes the main meat dish, two sides, and a desert ... all from her tiny RV that is parked near Mount St. Helens, Washington. Each week, she'll post a new entry with pictures and recipes, and the title will be "Morocco in an RV" or "Ethiopia in an RV." We used to all vote on what the next cuisine was going to be. It's pretty neat.

            witchywoman's Life in an RV Blog at Allrecipes.com
            "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

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            • #7
              One of my favorites - south indian style mutton curry - Mamsam Pulusu – Mutton Curry - Indian Food Recipes - Andhra Cuisine - Sailu&#039;s Kitchen
              For the oil you can use ghee.

              The website in general has a good range of indian recipes, many of which are primal and some of which you suit to primal cooking

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              • #8
                Turkish cuisine (I'm biased ) can be very very primal! Lots of delicious meat kebabs on skewers, tons of vegetable dishes cooked in olive oil, plenty of interesting seafood dishes in the coastal areas... It's a very varied cuisine so even though there are lots of dishes with rice, plenty of bread, desserts etc paleo/primal Turkish food can definitely be had! I quite like this blog for recipes:

                Almost Turkish
                My food blog, with many PB-friendly recipes

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                • #9
                  Korean is very primal - mostly meat, fish and vegetables. Korean BBQ is the ultimate caveman meal out - a variety of meats grilled in front of you, eaten as is or wrapped with lettuce - lots of vegetable side dishes. Tell the waitress "no rice."

                  Persians like grilled kebabs too - ground lamb is good. Ditto on no rice.
                  Positively Radical Pigeonholes are for Pigeons!

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                  • #10
                    Vietnamese Phở--Okay for those Primals who do eat rice!
                    Jamaican (jerk chicken with fried plantains--super yum!)
                    Italian antipasto
                    Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                    Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                    Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HillsideGina View Post
                      Korean is very primal - mostly meat, fish and vegetables. Korean BBQ is the ultimate caveman meal out - a variety of meats grilled in front of you, eaten as is or wrapped with lettuce - lots of vegetable side dishes. Tell the waitress "no rice."
                      Ooh, yeah, and Koreans do lots of delicious bone broths too. And seaweed!

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                      • #12
                        It's all good. I can't think of a single cuisine I've ever tried where I could honestly say there was nothing I liked. I'll admit, scrapple threw me for a loop and chapulinas in nopalito sauce was... interesting, but it was tasty.
                        Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                        My Latest Journal

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ennasirk View Post
                          I'd definitely do it if I had kids. I think the fact that I lived in Greece as a kid (age 5 to 8) did wonders to open me up to a wider variety of foods. My parents had a rule that you had to try everything at least once ... if you decided then that you didn't like it you could look for an alternative. But my brother and I ended up liking a lot of the food over there.

                          Oh yeah, Greek food can be awesomely primal!
                          We call it the "no thank you bite" as in, you aren't allowed to say no thank you until you've had a bite. Works very well for us. My boys love trying different ethnic cusines, almost as much as their parents do! I really want to go to this moroccan restaurant where you all sit on pillows on the floor and scoop your meal out of dishes with your hand!!!
                          The more I see the less I know for sure.
                          -John Lennon

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                          • #14
                            I love it all!

                            Thai, Indian, South American, Greek, Cuban, African, Jamaican, French, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, Mexican, Tex Mex (different from Mexican and it is taken to the next level), Indonesian, Moroccan.......the list goes on and on.

                            What's not to like? I'm glad I live in such a multicultural city where I can get it all pretty much whenever I want.

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                            • #15
                              I've been wondering all day what their "A" and "B" cuisines were!
                              "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

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