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Moving slow with pony (mini-rant)

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  • Moving slow with pony (mini-rant)

    So my darn horse has been lame for the last 3 months and we've been trying a ton of things to fix her that wouldn't need the vet (financial reasons but also because with rest it would get better and it seemed like a very minor thing (dragging the tip of one hoof). We finally called the vet when 3 months of stall rest and turnout didn't fix things. He came out yesterday, checked her over, took a bazillion x-rays and determine the bone in her hoof is wonky.

    So...basically...she has to "move slow", in other words, hand-walking 10-30 mins a day max. No going out in the field a-buckin and a-kickin, no playing with other ponies. Stall rest and walking on solid ground (no sand or deep footing) for a 30 minute max and corrective farrier treatments to try and get the bone back in place. Ack! How do you convince a young horse already on stall rest, in spring, to move slow!!!??? This is not gonna be fun but I keep telling myself at least it isn't surgery (yet).

    So here's to moving slow...with pony. Keep your fingers crossed.
    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

  • #2
    Ugh, I know the feeling. My horse has severe laminitis, and I constantly try telling her that limiting her grass-consumption isn't just to be mean.

    I'll keep my fingers crossed with deep sympathy! Going to check on my own lady in a moment. She's the one in the front; in the middle is our Lad, and then our little princess, May. Both are her offspring.
    Last edited by Bissen; 04-28-2011, 02:00 AM.

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    • #3
      Ugh, that can be tough!

      For her mental state, you might try a product called Focus Equine. It's made by Performance Equine USA and is pretty incredible stuff for quieting anxious minds. It's NOT a drug. Tell Carla Odetto, the owner, that Tamara with In the Night Farms sent you -- she's really good to work with and will take the time to answer all your questions.

      Also, do you have access to a good barefoot trimmer?
      Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

      Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

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      • #4
        I'm just envious that you HAVE a horse!
        --Trish (Bork)
        TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
        http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
        FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          Another thing you could consider is teaching her tricks! It'll have her use her brain, which is actually quite exhausting and a good challenge! It's also fun

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          • #6
            Thanks Barbeygirl! She doesn't get very axious, she's just bored and its starting to get sunny here which normally means turn-out (and fresh grass instead of hay). All her buddies are starting to get to spend time outside and she's ticked cause she can't go to. I thought it was a herd bound issue but no, its a it's-not-fair issue. Geez. I might give it a try though if she starts getting worse. Right now she just wants to go and run and play, which I've been letting her blow off steam a few days a week, (which apparently has been stalling the healing since she re-bruises the tendon in her kicking and playing, explains why she would get a little better, then worse, little better, then worse).

            Bissen! What beauties!!! Laminitis is such a pain in the rear/scary/biglongstringofcussing disease. She looks really good. I love her color. I hadn't thought of tricks...that would definitely keep her occupied (yes, I picked out a horse that may be smarter than me).

            Dr. Bork, at this moment you may have mine. LOL! There are days I stare at her and think of just how tasty those horse steaks have to be, as expensive as they are to maintain. Then she turns and flicks her ears a certain way and I'm mush. Oh well, I need to walk, she needs to walk-its a win-win (once I get past the expense of x-raying every darn joint in her hind leg, and that all this work might not fix the issue.)
            See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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            • #7
              Kaylee, I'll take her! LOL
              My 2yo is as horse crazy as I am. She definitely needs a horsey to love and brush and help mommy walk. She was riding before she could walk, no joke, I MADE SURE OF IT! lol
              They have a pony ride at Thanksgiving Point here in Utah. Every couple of months I take her for her pony fix
              --Trish (Bork)
              TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
              http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
              FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                I feel your pain; My gelding has negative plantar and planar angles caused by a barefoot trimmer who knew a whole lot less than what he thought (prior to his arrival with me). It's pricey and worse, may be permanent because pasturing him (which would help a LOT) is out due to EPSM (genetic starch intolerance, essentially).

                One thing that really helped Rebel (and as a TB, stall rest is not a whole lot of fun-he gets really owly) is backing up hills. Excellent exercise for the HQ, good for the stifles, and makes him think about his feet. Inhand work over cavaletti (eg poles on the ground) is good too, depending on what you're fighting. There are several good books on inhand work available on Amazon; Might help keep both of you sane.

                Good luck
                Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

                ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

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                • #9
                  Eklecktika, that's exactly what she has, but only in the right hind leg. I have no idea why only that foot, or why at all since she has perfect heels and angles from the outside and we were sure she had OCD in a joint but the x-rays were clean. We finally shot the hoof just for kicks, it was rather a surprise to see the coffin bone sitting at a negative 7 degree angle! Ack!!

                  When you say backing up a hill do you mean actually going backwards up the hill? (I know backing can mean different things in different disciplines). I'll look up those books, already walking in big circles around the outdoor pen is driving us both nuts, and its only been two days. I wish we had some flat trails on the property...oh well.
                  See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                  • #10
                    Yep, backing up the hill. It's really hard work at first, so don't ask for too much too soon. You're lucky you only have it in one, I have it all around (As well as EPSM....and wonky stifles...There's no such thing as a free horse...lol)

                    I'm confused as to why you're on stall rest for NPA though, I was advised to m o v e h i m as much as possible (and then the stifle injury on top of the already sticky stifles...gah. Just shoot me now!)

                    Reb's feet look good from the outside, big, round, typical heel-less TB feet though, and he has a funny stance-hunkers a bit, roach in his back, and just looks 'off'. I knew there was something not right, but fiugred we'd start shooting from the bottom up, since that was cheaper-and voila.

                    You can do TONS of lateral stuff inhand too-I'll see if I can find my list of titles.

                    Where in the PNW are you, out of curiosity? LOL we can form a NPA support group and commiserate
                    Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

                    ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

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                    • #11
                      Down in Eugene, OR. Vet said stall rest with a maximum of 10-30 minutes hand walking a day; corrective farrier work letting the heels grow out and getting the angles higher to take the pressure of the deep flexor tendon. If there isn't improvement in two months he's going to block the leg and make sure the NPA is the problem...the only other thing it could be is a crack some where in the pelvis, but to find that would include a full body scan (which starts at $1500).

                      Yikes! All around? Poor guy. Definitely need to start a support group, I didn't even know the coffin bone could do that without breaking or rotating. Sigh....the things you learn. I wonder if horses can go primal....LOL!!
                      See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                      • #12
                        I was advised that it could take as much as a year of wedge pads to correct-and Reb's only negative 1-2 degrees, not -7! But maybe a steeper incline shows improvement faster? I'm interested to see how he does - maybe we need to change something for Rebel!
                        Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

                        ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

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                        • #13
                          Vet recommended no pads, just trims to keep the toe in line and allow the heel to grow. He did say to let the farrier make the final decision, but since she's never had shoes and is only 3 he thought letting the hoof grow would be best for her overall legs. We'll see, everyone I talk to asks what shoes we are putting on and seem amazed the vet said just trims. *shrug* we shall see what happens. He did warn it would probably take 4-6 months before she'd be ride-able (assuming the heel-growing fixes the problem).
                          See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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