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  • Any Scientists on here ?

    Since going paleo I have been taking an interest in the learning process(noticed my thinking has changed since this new diet). I have been reading a book "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" and am trying to learn to apply the "emotional"(known as the artistic, feelings,etc) side towards the logical side. This is an example. My question is, are there any books/resources that you found to help cultivate your way of thinking for logical problems ? Please do not say "pick up a science book", as I want to take a step back and try to look at it from a broader perspective. Tell me if I don't make any sense

  • #2
    That's an interesting question, I look forward to seeing what sort of responses you get.

    The only books I could think to recommend would be some science biographies/histories... the one that popped into my mind first is "The Double Helix." Oh, also that book about Barbara McClintock... "A Feeling for the Organism" I think it's called. That one would probably be more what you're asking for, since her method of doing science is a major focus of the book, as it was pretty unique. (I haven't read any science/philosophy books outside of the field of biology in yeeeears so those are the only specific books I can recommend, heh.)

    My husband insists that the reason he's a scientific super-genius (my words, not his) is from learning computer programming at an early age. He was pretty much grounded from ages 10-16 so he spent all that time programming in his room. I don't know if that's what did it, but that guy LIVES the scientific method and logical thinking. Makes me jealous. =]
    "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

    I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mayness View Post
      My husband insists that the reason he's a scientific super-genius (my words, not his) is from learning computer programming at an early age. He was pretty much grounded from ages 10-16 so he spent all that time programming in his room. I don't know if that's what did it, but that guy LIVES the scientific method and logical thinking. Makes me jealous. =]
      Sounds like my childhood.

      As far as the original post goes, I think I need to understand what that Zen book is about to understand your question.

      I would recommend studying epistemology, and praxeology.

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      • #4
        I took a couple of courses of symbolic logic in university. They basically taught you how to think - they were no where near my major, but have been the most useful courses I took over my whole degree.
        Karin

        A joyful heart is good medicine

        He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose. - Jim Elliot

        Mmmmm. Real food is good.

        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29685.html

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        • #5
          Very interesting reply mayness. I have an interest in biology as well(evolutionary biology), currently reading "The Selfish Gene" by Richard Dawkins. It is interesting you point out that your husband absorbs the scientific method(just make sure he doesn't dive too deep in the "hypothesis" stage as that is a black hole). Yes I know people that have been programming at an early age and most of them are very sharp. The concept of learning at an early age is also of interest to me. I am curious into finding ways to absorb material like a kid throughout life. I think alot of it has to do with passion. Before I go off on a rant I will say .... I appreciate your input and am now going to look up " a feeling for the organism".....thanks for the reply!

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          • #6
            Speaking of getting better versed in logic, I always find this list fascinating:
            Fallacy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
            It's handy reference for anybody who sees a lot of arguing on internet forums, too!
            "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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            • #7
              Grok, without knowing the book you hit it pretty good. I won't spoil the book, but the author seems to adopt plenty epistemological perspectives in the book

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              • #8
                Also Grok,,that looks like a nice, FREE, penguin you have there

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                • #9
                  For a completely different angle from what others are saying, I found a class I took in college to be really awesome in teaching me about brain integration and learning methods. Educational Psychology. It's a textbook, but I have to say the class was phenomenal. My majors were nothing to do eith Ed. Psych, but I found applications of and evidence for the stuff I was learning every day. If you're interested, I can look up the name of it.

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                  • #10
                    Hmm, melodious' post reminded me... I was a psychology minor in college, and I found my Cognitive Psych class to be really helpful... I didn't directly learn much information that I could apply, but knowing a bit more about how the brain perceives and processes information really got me thinking about the ways that I think and learn, and helped me refine some of my techniques. I don't know of any good books on the topic, unfortunately.
                    "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                    I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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                    • #11
                      Start by reading some philosophy of science. Thomas Kuhn's "Structure of Scientific Revolutions" is a good place to start.
                      Primal eating in a nutshell: If you are hungry, eat Primal food until you are satisfied (not stuffed). Then stop. Wait until you're hungry again. Repeat.

                      Looking for my Cholesterol Primer? Here it is: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...mer-(Attempt-2)


                      Ditch the scale!: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33283.html

                      My Success Story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread30615.html

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                      • #12
                        I took some courses in classical rhetoric (not the same as what we call rhetoric now) as part of my undergrad, and I found them tremendously helpful in understanding how to construct a proper argument and properly refute someone else's argument, how to understand logic and syllogisms, what logical fallacies are, and so on.
                        “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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                        • #13
                          Also, learning basic geometry will help enormously with logical reasoning skills.
                          Primal eating in a nutshell: If you are hungry, eat Primal food until you are satisfied (not stuffed). Then stop. Wait until you're hungry again. Repeat.

                          Looking for my Cholesterol Primer? Here it is: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...mer-(Attempt-2)


                          Ditch the scale!: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33283.html

                          My Success Story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread30615.html

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                          • #14
                            I'm a Sports Scientist (so not a real scientist at all) so can only say what I find to be interesting - Biomechanics.
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                            • #15
                              I'm currently a graduate student, so I'm a scientist-in-training, essentially. The summer before I started grad school, I was really fascinated by the tremendous inspiration that the scientific method has given the great scientists and thinkers of the past. It's almost like the process of the scientific method satisfied some primal urge in these people. A few of the books I picked up since then (but haven't had the time to actually read...grad school happens) are below:

                              The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View for the Search of God by Carl Sagan
                              This book is actually Sagan's 1985 Gifford lectures.

                              Unweaving the Rainbow by Richard Dawkins

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