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How to derail temptation: My best advice.

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  • #16
    I've never been tested, but I am most likely celiac. I get the heartburn from hell and freeze if I accidentally eat a LITTLE bit of gluten. Yet, I've been craving Pizza Hut's bread sticks so badly I even plugged number into my cell phone so I could call them when I get off work. It's deleted now, but I still want to go get them. I don't know why I've been craving them so badly the last few days, but I am.

    Just having symptoms from hell afterwards is NOT enough to guarantee someone won't do it anyways.
    Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

    If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

    Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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    • #17
      For the 'man up' crowd, have you ever experienced turning away from something tempting, only to be called back by an internal voice, and have that scenario repeat itself every 3-4 minutes for the next four hours? An hour after every meal, for your whole life?

      You have to break the carbohydrate addiction (if you have one) before will power can come into play. We've done whole threads on this in the past; I don't think we need to go there again.

      Once the addiction is broken (and this is simple, but almost no one knows how to do it), you can use a normal level of will power to say no to the temptation once or twice in an extended period of time, and 'man up' works perfectly fine.

      Anyway, I was joining this thread to say, "Right on, Griff!" I wasn't blessed to have those severe reactions, and for the longest time I prayed to have some kind of reaction that would make the time between eating and reacting (which at the time was limited to weight gain) would be shorter. It took years, but it finally happened. Part of it was just my body no longer tolerating the abuse as well as it used to, but part of it was something as simple as a food journal.

      Not the kind where you write down stuff and feel guilty & horrible about it, but the kind where you just write food amounts, time of day, and any physical or emotional reactions. I finally started to see that if I didn't have enough protein for lunch, I was a raging banshee by 6:15, or that I was bloated and grumpy most of the time. I started taking out suspected culprits. Once the sugar was out (and it took time), so many symptoms were gone or diminished that I could more clearly see connections to other foods. Once the grains were out, it became VERY clear. If I ate grains only once a week instead of every meal, I could easily see how it made me bloated & grumpy.

      Now, a few years later, I'm to the point where I have ONE bite of wheat and I can feel the difference it makes in bloating. Nothing horrible, but the time elapsed between food & reaction is so close that when I look at those foods, I can actually immediately think "No, I do NOT want that reaction!"

      I certainly don't want it to take several years for everyone. If I could go back in time and advise myself, I'd say, "Increase fat dramatically, have at least 4oz of protein with 3 meals a day, remove all sweets & grains that *don't* really tempt you, then try to kick sugar. You'll fall, but keep a journal and watch how you react when you do. Within a few days or weeks, you'll be able to see something that tempts you and pretty quickly know & call to mind the reaction you can expect." At least, I think I would, lol. That'd be a pretty good way to instill some of the benefits of "Griff's gift" in someone who doesn't have it.
      5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
      Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
      Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
      Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
      ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

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      • #18
        For me it's more about feeling positive. I feel so great when I have a basket full of gorgeous fresh produce, or sit down to a colorful plate of veggies and a lovely piece of meat. It's shifting my attitude to thinking about how good this stuff tastes and how good it is for my body - sickly sweet things are less and less attractive to me - sugar is such a one-dimensional taste. Though I guess there is an element of looking at those sugar-coated doughnuts as though they were plastic (which is what they look like).

        Also I'm saving up for a trip, so when I resist the temptation of a drive-thru, $5 goes in the jar!
        If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

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        • #19
          at the wedding i went to on friday (it's tuesday now), it was a 'bring a vegetarian main dish to share!' for the reception. to drink -- lemonaide (sugar) and some sort of orange soda thing (more sugar). i just about had a coma from one little cup (i didn't realize what it was, honestly, until it was in my cup). then, i was getting water from the little kitchen in the corner all night. they did actually have chicken there, but everything else was -- rice, rice, some rice, some quinoa, and some rice, and veggie lasagna. i was very hungry, so i had some chicken, the rice-bean-veggie-avocado-greens salad. and then i also had cake. it was lovely cake.

          i felt *horrid* and have been jittery since. bloated feeling (though not looking like it), and i knew i would. lol i even ate a huge lunch and brought a primal snack, but as weddings normally go, this was was running late, and i was *hungry*. so, i ate. not a lot, mind you, but enough to make me feel yucky.

          so, there we are. i had that feeling when we had toast for the first time after being primal for about 4-5 weeks. amazing.

          i have no issue with the willpower side of things, but i'm not addicted. (and i know i'm not). it's just habitual. now, i'm in new habits.

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          • #20
            I have to say fortunately, I'm not familiar with addictive cravings. Maybe it's a personality thing, maybe it's a genetic thing, maybe it's just a personal experience and luck thing. Either way, I find it pretty easy to do or not do what I want.

            It's also kind of hard to miss mashed potatoes when I know I can have another steak instead.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
              For the 'man up' crowd, have you ever experienced turning away from something tempting, only to be called back by an internal voice, and have that scenario repeat itself every 3-4 minutes for the next four hours? An hour after every meal, for your whole life?
              You have to break the carbohydrate addiction (if you have one) before will power can come into play. We've done whole threads on this in the past; I don't think we need to go there again.
              Once the addiction is broken (and this is simple, but almost no one knows how to do it), you can use a normal level of will power to say no to the temptation once or twice in an extended period of time, and 'man up' works perfectly fine.
              Oh, Please! This is coming dangerously close to The Twinkie Defense.

              Comment


              • #22
                People with food issues generally also have a number of other emotional issues at play, so being gentle is likely to go further than being tough.
                “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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                • #23
                  A true friend is the person who tells you what you need to hear not what you want to hear.

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                  • #24
                    No worries, Paleobird, I felt exactly the way you felt for most of my life and completely understand where you're coming from. Truly.

                    Originally posted by Yaish View Post
                    I have to say fortunately, I'm not familiar with addictive cravings. Maybe it's a personality thing, maybe it's a genetic thing, maybe it's just a personal experience and luck thing. Either way, I find it pretty easy to do or not do what I want.
                    I did, too, until I had a long string of infections, treated with several years on antibiotics, and suddenly what was just a SAD became a spiral into sugar & grains nearly all the time. I remember crying one night, not able to understand what was happening to me. I had been so strong-willed all my life that many times I had been (foolishly) confident that I could literally do ANYthing I put my mind to. I had prided myself many times on how if I decided to do something, I always achieved it, and how strong my willpower was if I needed to study, fast, exercise, or accomplish anything else. I mocked those who were overweight and scorned anyone whom I deemed psychologically weak, emotional, or "unable to control himself." Yet here I was unable to stop eating something I knew would eventually destroy my health (of course, I didn't know at the time that grains were part of the problem).

                    I know what it's like to think it's absurd and lame to say someone "can't" say no to sweet food, and I know what it's like not to be able to say no and to think you're losing your mind. And thank God, now I know what it's like to be able to say no again, b/c as soon as I increased fat & protein and decreased grains, the crazy internal urgings to eat more sugar (& grains) die away and become just a normal thing you can easily brush off again.

                    It's about biochemistry. Read Taubes, google "sugar addictive heroin," find the countless studies that discuss how sugar creates an addiction just as real as alcohol & street drugs. It's like a light switch - fix the nutritional surroundings and the addiction all but turns off; bring the unnatural diet back in and the body yearns for incredible amounts of carbohydrates again. I'm glad you're blessed never to have been susceptible to it. Many never are, and as soon as they learn or realize that primal eating is the most ideal for their health, they switch to it as a simple matter of will. My husband is like that.

                    For me, it was all kicked off with the gut dysbiosis resulting from the antibiotics on top of my pitiful diet; many others are more unfortunate and have that dysbiosis happen in childhood or at birth. I am very fortunate to have discovered, through resources such as MDA, how to turn on and off those cravings, but I know many still haven't. There, but for the grace of God, go I.
                    Last edited by MamaGrok; 02-07-2011, 08:56 PM. Reason: silly typos w/ babe lying on one arm
                    5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
                    Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
                    Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
                    Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
                    ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      AMEN. That's what's been revelatory to me about all the science on this website. When we have a severe craving or temptation, society mostly paints this as a do-or-die willpower moment. It's a moral battle - will you have the inner strength to succeed in beating the temptation?! But that point of view is so effed up. The enemy isn't the temptation. It's your psychotic blood chemistry that's the enemy. What are you supposed to attack in a fight - the weapon or the enemy? We have to look at temptations like a loaded gun we want to convince the enemy to put down and get rid of, not learn to live life with a frickin weapon pointed at us at all times! What kind of life is that? We have to know that eating non-Primal foods can prompt the enemy to hold up the gun again and then there's a whole new episode of convincing him to put down the gun. When I have to fight off a craving like that, what helps me is reading the science of what's going on in my body. To take the analogy much further than I intended it's like psychoanalyzing my enemy and finding out he's just got a little disorder and needs some love and patience.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Griff View Post
                        I wish I could give everyone here a gift - my wheat and gluten allergy.
                        What's funny about this thread topic is I wanted to start one about whether anyone's pretended to have a wheat/gluten allergy or to be a celiac. Because when people really start noticing you're not drinking alcohol anymore, etc. I'm really too shy to play diet missionary. I wish I could just say, yeah, doctors told me I can't ever eat any wheat or gluten again -- EVER. And then THERE. BAM! I wouldn't have to debate anyone on diet ideas. It would just be me and a condition and no one would want to make me feel shitty about it.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
                          I know what it's like to think it's absurd and lame to say you "can't" say no to sweet food, and I know what it's like not to be able to say no and to think you're losing your mind. And thank God, now I know what it's like to be able to say no again, b/c as soon as I increased fat & protein and decreased grains, the crazy internal urgings to eat more sugar (& grains) die away and become just a normal thing you can easily brush off again.

                          I am very fortunate to have discovered, through resources such as MDA, how to turn on and off those cravings, but I know many still haven't. There, but for the grace of God, go I.
                          You knew what you needed to do in order to change the situation and you did it and I applaud you. (From the stats in your sig line it looks like you are making some great progress.) I think I actually would have more patience with non MDA folks because they don't have the information and resources that we do here. They at least have the excuse of ignorance. When I lose patience, it is with the people who come on this forum repeatedly whining about how they ate x food and how they knew they would feel rotten after but they just couldn't help themselves. OK, you do that once, it is a learning experience like hitting yourself in the thumb with a hammer. You learn to be more careful. But then the same people are back with the same stories the next week, over and over. At some point it starts to look like they are not just addicted to sugar, they are addicted to feeling miserable and don't really want to change.

                          And instead of their friends saying, "Hey! Stop doing that to yourself", everybody says, "There, there. You can't help it. You are addicted to sugar. It's so powerful that you have a built in excuse any time you want to indulge." This just fosters warm fuzzy complacency.

                          If you really believe that the grace of God changed things, I respect that. My opinion is that is was you "personing up" that got it done.

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                          • #28
                            It was learning what created the cravings (insufficient fat & protein, excess carbohydrates) that did it.

                            A lot of people here on MDA still don't know that. I found the first half of the trick at Radiant Recovery, which tries to end sugar addiction with a really excellent program whose fatal flaw is dependence on vast quantities of whole grains. If I could combine RR with MDA, that would be a place that could really help stop the crazy cravings and turn them into manageable cravings. I still have them occasionally, but they're manageable, and that makes all the difference. I can man up and win over manageable cravings; I'd have to Uberman up to win over what I used to face.

                            Now, are there people who don't have crazy cravings, just normal ones, and they aren't manning up? Sure, probably. But there are simply a lot of people who just don't know yet the importance of stabilizing the biochemistry with fat & protein before cutting out the grains if they want to maximize their chances of success.
                            5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
                            Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
                            Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
                            Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
                            ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
                              It was learning what created the cravings (insufficient fat & protein, excess carbohydrates) that did it.

                              A lot of people here on MDA still don't know that. I found the first half of the trick at Radiant Recovery, which tries to end sugar addiction with a really excellent program whose fatal flaw is dependence on vast quantities of whole grains. If I could combine RR with MDA, that would be a place that could really help stop the crazy cravings and turn them into manageable cravings. I still have them occasionally, but they're manageable, and that makes all the difference. I can man up and win over manageable cravings; I'd have to Uberman up to win over what I used to face.

                              Now, are there people who don't have crazy cravings, just normal ones, and they aren't manning up? Sure, probably. But there are simply a lot of people who just don't know yet the importance of stabilizing the biochemistry with fat & protein before cutting out the grains if they want to maximize their chances of success.
                              This was definitely the case for me. Even though I was fighting tooth and nail to get my life back from severe pain and debilitating fatigue, I would have crazy cravings and give in when doing other diets - including lower fat Cordain paleo. So by the "suck it up" logic, that means I was a whiney loser then, but now suddenly I have all this discipline and strength? I don't think so.

                              I am still the same person, with the same motives for health, and the same will-power. What has changed is the biochemistry in my body.
                              Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                              http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
                                It was learning what created the cravings (insufficient fat & protein, excess carbohydrates) that did it.
                                A lot of people here on MDA still don't know that.
                                But there are simply a lot of people who just don't know yet the importance of stabilizing the biochemistry with fat & protein before cutting out the grains if they want to maximize their chances of success.
                                Sorry, I was assuming that people posting here actually read something here too, but maybe they don't.

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