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  • #31
    I looooove coffee, perhaps too much - can't function without a morning dose. I like a darker roast with some heavy cream when at home (half and half at the coffeeshop will do). My favourite brands are Nabob traditional roast (this is my go-to morning), Meinl (Austrian), Serrano and Cubita (Cuban.) I am partial to Starbucks lattes (don't care for the Second Cup ones - way too bitter despite the real chocolate shavings on top.) And an espresso is a great alternative to dessert when out for a nice dinner. If I want something more special at home, I will make Turkish coffee or Viennese coffee (with whipped cream.)

    I cannot stand coffee that is too weak (too little coffee for the quantity of water used). For this reason I avoid Tim Horton's, which is enough for most of my fellow Canadians to attempt to crucify me. :-)

    Really not a tea person, but that's because I can't be bothered with the tea-pot, loose leaf business. Most of the grocery store teas taste like cardboard. I do like the Celestial Seasonings Bengal Spice, and most other infusions (ie. no actual tea leaves in them) are nice too on a cold winter night.

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    • #32
      I was never a big coffee drinker before going primal - more of a 20 daily cans of Mountain Dew type of person (with the 48 inch waist and type II diabetes to match )
      I have a Starbucks coffee machine, a couple of grinders on each floor and an espresso machine at work. Took awhile to get used to drinking black coffee instead of soda - now that I have tried several different blends I drink a bit - 4-8 16oz cups at work of either Sumatra or Cafe Verona the 4 days I work - Lactose intolerant makes steamed milk with espresso not a pleasant option but every now and again I'll toss a shot or 2 of espresso into my coffee. We also have Tazo tea stations - didn't like earl grey before, now its right behind Zen green tea as my fav (love the mint in the Zen tea).
      At home I have coffee occasionally - usually Boyer's Rocky Mountain Thunder. Most of the time outside of work I drink water or unsweetened tea.
      Last edited by Rud3d0g; 01-16-2011, 07:26 AM.
      "First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do" - Epictetus

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      • #33
        Originally posted by unchatenfrance View Post
        I cannot stand coffee that is too weak (too little coffee for the quantity of water used). For this reason I avoid Tim Horton's, which is enough for most of my fellow Canadians to attempt to crucify me. :-)
        Timmies gives me wicked heartburn and it doesn't taste good. I have no idea why its so popular?

        I want to learn how to make a good latte, I need an espresso maker. Can you imagine, one made with coconut milk? Mmmm.
        SW: 235
        CW:220
        Rough start due to major carb WD.

        MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
        Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
        Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
        Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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        • #34
          Originally posted by elorajade View Post
          Can you imagine, one made with coconut milk? Mmmm.
          Never thought about bringing in my own dairy substitute - wonder how well almond milk will steam - only one way to know for sure....
          "First say to yourself what you would be; and then do what you have to do" - Epictetus

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          • #35
            I'm currently drinking my coffee with coconut milk. I really love it with heavy creme, but I'm cutting dairy out for a while.
            ...how do you look, feel, and perform? -- Robb Wolf

            My Blog.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by NutMeg View Post
              I love coffee. I drink usually a medium roast, not too picky about the brand, but I am not a fan of Folger's.
              folgers = ass, totally. although i think this has been backed up by the other posters

              Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
              I'm so cheap with coffee, I'm actually a big fan of ... don't laugh ... Dunkin Donuts Hazelnut but I buy it and make it myself... so that's like, you know, more legit?

              I don't care, I like it. I don't really like strong coffees like the type you get at starbucks, so I guess I'm far from a coffee connoisseur. My family gets either regular Dunkin Donuts medium blend or the hazelnut stuff.

              Oh man, does this mean I run on Dunkin? I'm going to start drawing a spear on the little dude on their logo.
              yanno, i gotta say that dunkin donuts coffee is totally underrated. we'll buy some on occasion and its enjoyable.

              regular coffee drinker here, too - although those of you who have met me and my SO in person have a good understanding of what 'regular' means to us usually whatever is on sale, unless it's folgers. eeeech. i like my coffee like i like my men - dark, strong, and bitter. it must punch me in the face when i try to drink it. also, darker roasts have less caffeine.
              sigpic

              HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

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              • #37
                I need to clear the air about Folger's. It blows, but when there is nothing else available, there are ways to make it bearable. First, you have to brew it strong. If you brew it the prescribed way, it will burn a hole in your stomach. 1 TBS of coffee grounds per Cup of water. It is full of over burnt, robusto beans and flavor additives, but it's manufactured so that every giant ass can of coffee smells and tastes exactly the same. It's supposed to remind you of the greasy spoon, and Grandpa's Thermos. It's not the best choice, but if you have to drink it, make it strong.
                Every Day is a New Adventure

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                • #38
                  Does anyone have any experience with Intelligentsia coffes?

                  http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/
                  Every Day is a New Adventure

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                  • #39
                    can anyone explain to me the proper way to brew tea? my sencha tasted so different this morning- the first time i let the leaves steep inside one of those scissor-style infusers. the second time, i let my tea leaves float loosely in the cup. second batch was much better, and i'm wondering if the leaves do not have enough room to expand in the infuser. are there different ways to brew different types of tea? the only equipment i have are are a little saucepan for heating the water, and the scissor infusers. i would buy others if i was sure that there was a qualitative difference in the end product.
                    my primal journal:
                    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                    • #40
                      it depends upon the tea itself. the packaging should have instructions on both water temperature and steeping time.

                      and then you experiment.

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                      • #41
                        I buy bulk; the packaging has the bare-bones information about what type of tea it is and othe basic information like whether it's ft, og, etc.
                        my primal journal:
                        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                        • #42
                          you should be able to find some information online, then. it really depends upon the tea.

                          but, cheap tea usually needs just a little time in the hot water.

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                          • #43
                            the jasmine green tea i'm sipping right now costs $29/lb. is that cheap? what makes you think i'm buying cheap tea?
                            my primal journal:
                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                            • #44
                              typically, buying in bulk is cheap, so that was the assumption. but then, i buy in bulk at the tea shop, where teas range from "less expensive" to "more expensive" to "ridiculously expensive" (just as coffee does), so buying in bulk doesn't necessarily mean that. of course, the least expensive tea at our shop runs at about $88 per pound (for jasmine green), so, it is comparatively "cheap."

                              as for how to steep it, if you don't have instructions, you can contact the company from whom you purchased it (that is, the brand) or look it up on the internet. there should be some resources.

                              i find that any tea -- such as lipton which has a generally terrible flavor and is extremely cheap -- can taste quite good *if* it's not steeped for too long. so, by steeping it for less than 3-5 minutes, you will likely get a better flavor.

                              and this tends to be true overall. green tea steeps fast, white even faster, black takes a bit longer, but most don't steep for more than 5 minutes. herbal infusions may take longer, depending upon what is in them and the specific use (eg, my medicinal teas have to be steeped covered for 10 minutes exactly. if you do it more or less, it looses it's medicinal qualities. you also have to use a specific temperature of water. just the way it is).

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                                typically, buying in bulk is cheap, so that was the assumption. but then, i buy in bulk at the tea shop, where teas range from "less expensive" to "more expensive" to "ridiculously expensive" (just as coffee does), so buying in bulk doesn't necessarily mean that. of course, the least expensive tea at our shop runs at about $88 per pound (for jasmine green), so, it is comparatively "cheap."

                                as for how to steep it, if you don't have instructions, you can contact the company from whom you purchased it (that is, the brand) or look it up on the internet. there should be some resources.

                                i find that any tea -- such as lipton which has a generally terrible flavor and is extremely cheap -- can taste quite good *if* it's not steeped for too long. so, by steeping it for less than 3-5 minutes, you will likely get a better flavor.

                                and this tends to be true overall. green tea steeps fast, white even faster, black takes a bit longer, but most don't steep for more than 5 minutes. herbal infusions may take longer, depending upon what is in them and the specific use (eg, my medicinal teas have to be steeped covered for 10 minutes exactly. if you do it more or less, it looses it's medicinal qualities. you also have to use a specific temperature of water. just the way it is).
                                gotcha. i buy most of my tea, coffee, and spices in bulk. spices are always far superior like this. the teas are much better than boxed/bagged stuff, but that's all i have for comparison. i don't think we actually have any tea shops here, though there's a coffee shop which sells different sorts of looseleaf teas.
                                my primal journal:
                                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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