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Dehydration on cellular level?

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  • Dehydration on cellular level?

    I posted a blog on my CW site saying I am not dehydrated, even though supposedly LC people are. Someone said it is dehydration ona cellular level because of depleted glycogen stores. Well, they didn't say it as properly as all that.

    Anyway, what is the answer to this? I know we loss 'water weight' and excess glycogen. But how do I discuss it?

    Unless someone wants to help a sister out...lol You can view/reply here...lol

    http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http...792545&h=13475
    Meghan

    My MDA journal

    Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

    And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

  • #2
    Water is stored when glycogen is stored. No question.

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    • #3
      My question is: what's the downside of this "dehydration"? If the body needs less water when in a keto state, why is that a bad thing?
      Liz.

      Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
      Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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      • #4
        I agree Lizch! I don't see it as a bad thing, which is why I want info to debate the bozo
        Meghan

        My MDA journal

        Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

        And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Holy crap! Just read the responses, Tublady reckons she never eats over 1000 cals? How does she get throught the day?!

          On the 'dehydration at a cellular level' issue. I think it's nonsense to suggest that your body uses the water stored with the glycogen in muscle when exercising to re-hydrate itself as such. Glycogen is broken down into glucose via a process called hydrolysis. That means that water is used to convert the gylcogen to utilisible glucose. Glycogen is a very large molecule that is made up lots of chains of about 13 linked glucose molecules (I got my textbook so I wouldn't spout a load of crap). In order for these glucose molecules to be used as fuel a water molecule is used to chemically break apart the polysaccaride.
          So granted, you need water to access your glycogen stores, however if his point is that you are dehydrated because you don't have the water attached to your muscle glycogen, my point would perhaps be that if you only store as much water with the glycogen as is needed to break it down.

          I don't know if that makes any sense, it sounds right in my head but that doesn't mean much

          Re-think, you may store less water if you store less glycogen, but you need less water as you don't have to break it down.
          Last edited by NourishedEm; 11-19-2010, 12:19 AM. Reason: Added last sentence hoping I make more sense
          My Journal

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          • #6
            For every gram of carbs, your body retains approx 3grams of water. So when on a low carb high protien diet, you lose this excess water, hence the initial weight loss. Now personally I don't care if I lose water or fat in the early stages. Water loss is good for reducing blood pressure and it decreases the volume of blood, and this decreases blood pressure.

            I wonder why we do store more water with carbs? Is it becuase water is a buffer and we were never meant to eat so many carbs and its the body's way of coping?

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            • #7
              If you are getting enough fats in your diet, your body will make all the glucose you need. You don't need to eat carbs to have glucose circulating in your body. If you are not eating enough fats, then I could see where you might run into a problem.
              ...how do you look, feel, and perform? -- Robb Wolf

              My Blog.

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              • #8
                A hundred and fifty pound person can have as much as half a pound of glycogen stored up if they are eating enough carbs to do it. Glycogen, however bonds with water molecules so half a pound of glycogen looks like give pounds of weight. So, when one goes low carb and or fasts there is a potential for five pounds of "water weight" to be absorbed into the skeletal muscles and liver. It's enough to be visibly noticeable as well. As one's muscle mass increased the amount of water weight goes up as well so, the effect could be even more dramatic on heavier people.
                http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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                • #9
                  My understanding is that the water held by glycogen is not functionally useful to the cell, other than for hydrating the glycogen.

                  It's like putting a glass full of water on your desk and saying "this glass is holding water on my desk, so my desk is wet"

                  A cell packed with glycogen has water associated with it and people seem to equate "this glycogen is holding water in my cells, so my cells are hydrated"

                  Does that make sense?

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                  • #10
                    Dehydrated on a cellular level? They are just making crap up in a desperate attempt to not be wrong.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DianeThePurple View Post
                      Dehydrated on a cellular level? They are just making crap up in a desperate attempt to not be wrong.
                      that's what I was going to say, only funnier.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the input.
                        Meghan

                        My MDA journal

                        Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

                        And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When Dr Atkins mentioned low carb as a "diuretic" diet, he advised against people taking diuretics to lose weight faster--a common practice at the time he first wrote (early 70s). His point was that the combination could cause dehydration. Low carb eating will only cause water loss at the very beginning (encouraging people with big losses and confusing the dumb ones who expect to lose at that rate consistently). Then the body adjusts, and, ideally, you don't retain water, but you're not dehydrated--the healthy body is always seeking homeostasis. However, many women on low carb will still retain water with hormonal shifts--an example of how the body adjusts its functions to the low carb eating and retains as much water as it wants to!

                          If you're interested in dehydration, however, I've had a recent experience--although it's fairly unique, there are some people on these boards who may relate to it. For the past few months, several mornings a week, I was running low BP (about 54/45), low enough for me to feel lightheaded and dizzy. Breakfast and coffee didn't raise it, as it commonly does, and it would often stay low for 6-9 hours before it was normal.

                          At first I worried about hormones because I have Hashimoto's and thought that my adrenals or parathyroids were a problem, but my endo ran tests, and they were fine. So I contacted my cardiologist. Although I have a healthy heart (he checks me annually), I worried that at my age (69), my heart had become too weak to sustain my BP.

                          However, what the cardiologist told me was, "Your heart is fine, but I suspect those mornings that this happens, you're dehydrated." I told him that eating and drinking should help if it's only dehydration, but it doesn't. Then he explained--over the past years, I've steadily lost weight slowly, going from 340 (my high) to my current 165. He said that while I lost fat, my vascular system didn't shrink, so I basically have the vascular system of someone 300 lbs+, and I need to hydrate a lot more to maintain my blood volume because I have a much larger blood volume that someone else my current size.

                          He said that in my dehydrated state, fluids just 'go through' me--and he's right because I pee like crazy when I drink. He said the solution was a sports drink or something like Pedialyte because what I need is the electrolytes, and that will help me retain other fluids.

                          Two days after this visit, I woke with that very low BP, and I got right on the scale--159! It wasn't weight loss; it was a sign of dehydration--I had lost too much water. I drank some Pedialyte, and I found that I wasn't peeing as much, and within an hour, my BP was normal. He suggests that I just plan to have a small glass of Pedialyte each morning before breakfast, and I probably will avoid dehydration and low BP--I need to help my body maintain homeostasis.

                          Interestingly, during my weight loss journey, I found myself wanting to drink constantly throughout the day--water, tea, etc., and now I think it is my body's way of helping me maintain my blood volume and remain hydrated.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by emmie View Post
                            When Dr Atkins mentioned low carb as a "diuretic" diet, he advised against people taking diuretics to lose weight faster--a common practice at the time he first wrote (early 70s). His point was that the combination could cause dehydration. Low carb eating will only cause water loss at the very beginning (encouraging people with big losses and confusing the dumb ones who expect to lose at that rate consistently). Then the body adjusts, and, ideally, you don't retain water, but you're not dehydrated--the healthy body is always seeking homeostasis. However, many women on low carb will still retain water with hormonal shifts--an example of how the body adjusts its functions to the low carb eating and retains as much water as it wants to!

                            If you're interested in dehydration, however, I've had a recent experience--although it's fairly unique, there are some people on these boards who may relate to it. For the past few months, several mornings a week, I was running low BP (about 54/45), low enough for me to feel lightheaded and dizzy. Breakfast and coffee didn't raise it, as it commonly does, and it would often stay low for 6-9 hours before it was normal.

                            At first I worried about hormones because I have Hashimoto's and thought that my adrenals or parathyroids were a problem, but my endo ran tests, and they were fine. So I contacted my cardiologist. Although I have a healthy heart (he checks me annually), I worried that at my age (69), my heart had become too weak to sustain my BP.

                            However, what the cardiologist told me was, "Your heart is fine, but I suspect those mornings that this happens, you're dehydrated." I told him that eating and drinking should help if it's only dehydration, but it doesn't. Then he explained--over the past years, I've steadily lost weight slowly, going from 340 (my high) to my current 165. He said that while I lost fat, my vascular system didn't shrink, so I basically have the vascular system of someone 300 lbs+, and I need to hydrate a lot more to maintain my blood volume because I have a much larger blood volume that someone else my current size.

                            He said that in my dehydrated state, fluids just 'go through' me--and he's right because I pee like crazy when I drink. He said the solution was a sports drink or something like Pedialyte because what I need is the electrolytes, and that will help me retain other fluids.

                            Two days after this visit, I woke with that very low BP, and I got right on the scale--159! It wasn't weight loss; it was a sign of dehydration--I had lost too much water. I drank some Pedialyte, and I found that I wasn't peeing as much, and within an hour, my BP was normal. He suggests that I just plan to have a small glass of Pedialyte each morning before breakfast, and I probably will avoid dehydration and low BP--I need to help my body maintain homeostasis.

                            Interestingly, during my weight loss journey, I found myself wanting to drink constantly throughout the day--water, tea, etc., and now I think it is my body's way of helping me maintain my blood volume and remain hydrated.
                            That is very interesting! I have lost a lot of weight over the past couple of years and I have really low BP too. I might try the pedialyte trick too.
                            My Journal

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