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How else is conventional wisdom failing us?

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  • How else is conventional wisdom failing us?

    The economist John Kenneth Galbraith once defined conventional wisdom as "...that body of beliefs that is assiduously, solemnly, and mindlessly traded among the pretentiously wise."

    The Primal Blueprint (and lots of other supportive work) pretty well tears out the foundation of conventional diet and conventional exercise.

    The growing barefoot running surge is built on the crumbling foundations of the conventional running show paradigm. And now we are seeing many brands of running shoes rolling out new models of minimalist shoes, dozens of models that didn't exist a year ago.

    My question is: What are the other bodies of conventional wisdom that are failing us?

    Inquisitively,
    One Delta Ten Tango

  • #2
    Doctors/hospitals/high intervention birth is safest for all women regardless of risk level. Many people have been hitting their heads against THAT brick wall for many years now. Midwives have been proven time and time again to have similar outcomes and less injury to moms.

    Take episiotomy....done from 1950 on at almost all doctor-attended births. It was supposed to prevent tearing as the baby emerges, but that's nonsensical, because once you cut something, it tears MORE easily. A study 5 years ago finally brought the rates down from 90% of births to more like 20%, but even then at a frustratingly slow pace. Before that, moms have suffered horrendously and needlessly for decades.

    Or cutting the umbilical cord right away, full of precious stem cells and iron. Babies have up to 40% less blood if it's cut right away rather than wait till it shuts off the flow by itself. It was an intervention never proven to be effective, but became the default.

    There are two examples of an industry strewn with them.
    Liz.

    Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
    Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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    • #3
      Other than diet, exercise, sun exposure, bacterial exposure, hygiene, health care, transportation, policies, politics, chemical dependence, and the over-medicating of anybody that goes into a doctor?

      Well, there's the general idea of what constitutes 'manliness.' Manliness today means eating, drinking, fucking, smoking and doing whatever you want, because DAMN THE CONSEQUENCES. There is definitely something to be said about throwing caution to the wind and doing something inherently dangerous for the experience. However, eating a hamburger with donuts instead of buns is not really thrilling, it's just going to give you the shits and make you feel horrible. For some reason thinking about consequences (i.e. weighing the pros and cons of drinking a 36 pack by yourself over the weekend) is a pussy move. Unfortunately, the manliest men today are fat, drunk, absurdly unhealthy, miserable, intolerant of most anything different from themselves and usually, complete assholes.

      The scariest thing about 'manliness' is that it is not a policy or health craze. Dr. Oz doesn't get on the air and espouse the benefits of banging the county bicycle while doing rails. It's got more in common with a grass-roots movement. Peer pressure and sociable norms cause 'manliness.' A dangerous form of conventional NON-wisdom. It is now cool to be ignorant and oblivious to consequences.

      Case in point; go to your local dive bar, find the fattest dude-bro there, swilling a boot of beer, and tell him what gluten does to a gastrointestinal tract. Don't be abusive or accusatory, just state the facts. How will he respond? He'll probably call you a fag. What a sweetheart.
      A steak a day keeps the doctor away.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by shiggles View Post
        Other than diet, exercise, sun exposure, bacterial exposure, hygiene, health care, transportation, policies, politics, chemical dependence, and the over-medicating of anybody that goes into a doctor?
        Ha, that list is like the reverse of a scene from Monty Python's Life of Brian where one guy says "What have the Romans ever done for us?" and his supposedly supportive anti-Roman audience starts offering up a few suggestions until he ends up with quite a list: "All right... all right... but apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order... what have the Romans done for us?"
        Liz.

        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lizch View Post
          Ha, that list is like the reverse of a scene from Monty Python's Life of Brian where one guy says "What have the Romans ever done for us?" and his supposedly supportive anti-Roman audience starts offering up a few suggestions until he ends up with quite a list: "All right... all right... but apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order... what have the Romans done for us?"
          Oh MAN! I am watching that movie tonight. It's been too long since I've seen it. Maybe I'll tail it with History of the World Pt. 1
          A steak a day keeps the doctor away.

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          • #6
            Other than diet, exercise, sun exposure, bacterial exposure, hygiene, health care, transportation, policies, politics, chemical dependence, and the over-medicating of anybody that goes into a doctor?
            I would like to add economics to the list.
            ...how do you look, feel, and perform? -- Robb Wolf

            My Blog.

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            • #7
              Education. The best way to teach kids is to separate them into groups by age, talk at them and teach them to take a test so they can get a certain score. And this will make them successful.

              Oh... and socialization... kids need to go to school so they can learn how to be social. Umm.... so they can ONLY learn to be social with kids their own age, instead of being more involved in their communities and learning to value and be social with younger kids, babies, older kids, adults and grandparents. Ya... that's turning out really well.
              sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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              • #8
                I'll pipe in.

                Not taking responsibility for your own life and mistakes. How many people automatically look for someone to blame and sue when it is just a matter of 'shit happens'. Here in Australia we had an example where a bloke was body surfing and got dumped by a wave and had his spine damaged. He is now paraplegic. He sued the local town council for not having warning signs up that swimming was dangerous. Thankfully common sense prevailed and he lost.

                My second point stems from something my grandmother taught me when I was knee high to a grasshopper. If you've made a mistake. Apologize immediately you realize it and people will respect you much much more. We have a TV show on at the moment called 'The Block'. Couples renovate rooms each week in an apartment block and so forth. Anyway one of the couples screwed up in the second episode and needed to apologize to the others so the bloke called in his twin brother and had him apologize for him without the others realizing it wasn't the real person. The couple in question thought it was a great joke.

                To me that was a very very low act. However it seems to be becoming more and more commonplace with a mentality of every person for themselves and screw the consequences.

                I remember reading an article that postulated that humans in tribal groups learned to be socialist and care for eachother as it's the only way to guarantee group survival and that if you were selfish and ousted from the group your chances of passing your genes along dramatically reduce. Unfortunately in our society we separate ourselves from our fellows so much those consequences no longer matter and so selfishness is coming to the fore more and more.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by thanatos View Post
                  I remember reading an article that postulated that humans in tribal groups learned to be socialist and care for eachother as it's the only way to guarantee group survival and that if you were selfish and ousted from the group your chances of passing your genes along dramatically reduce. Unfortunately in our society we separate ourselves from our fellows so much those consequences no longer matter and so selfishness is coming to the fore more and more.
                  I absolutely see this. Especially in the US I think, take care of yourself and screw everyone else is the prevalent - and often admired - attitude. But the human race wouldn't have gotten far with that in the beginning.

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                  • #10
                    That your weight is a measurement of your health

                    That the FDA is there to protect us

                    That pasteurized milk is safer than raw milk

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by thanatos View Post
                      I'll pipe in.

                      Not taking responsibility for your own life and mistakes. How many people automatically look for someone to blame and sue when it is just a matter of 'shit happens'. Here in Australia we had an example where a bloke was body surfing and got dumped by a wave and had his spine damaged. He is now paraplegic. He sued the local town council for not having warning signs up that swimming was dangerous. Thankfully common sense prevailed and he lost.

                      My second point stems from something my grandmother taught me when I was knee high to a grasshopper. If you've made a mistake. Apologize immediately you realize it and people will respect you much much more. We have a TV show on at the moment called 'The Block'. Couples renovate rooms each week in an apartment block and so forth. Anyway one of the couples screwed up in the second episode and needed to apologize to the others so the bloke called in his twin brother and had him apologize for him without the others realizing it wasn't the real person. The couple in question thought it was a great joke.

                      To me that was a very very low act. However it seems to be becoming more and more commonplace with a mentality of every person for themselves and screw the consequences.

                      I remember reading an article that postulated that humans in tribal groups learned to be socialist and care for eachother as it's the only way to guarantee group survival and that if you were selfish and ousted from the group your chances of passing your genes along dramatically reduce. Unfortunately in our society we separate ourselves from our fellows so much those consequences no longer matter and so selfishness is coming to the fore more and more.
                      I agree to both. Elwyne's right that here in the US it's becoming the normal, common thing to put yourself first, and screw everyone else. Then to be confused when people don't want to be around you. :-/ Too much freaking "reality" TV, everyone wants to be a character, be a star, and get paid to be an asshat.

                      And I've NEVER understood why you would NOT apologize when you're wrong? If I realize I've messed up, it's the first thing I do. I feel like it's only fair to admit it when you do something stupid and admit it and try to fix it and/or move on.
                      sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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                      • #12
                        I was always taught "You fuck up, you fix it (or apologize sincerely if it can't be fixed), you move on. No point in being dumb about it."
                        Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                        My Latest Journal

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                        • #13
                          EVERYTHING.

                          Taking responsibility for your own life. How to communicate from your authentic self to anyone instead of from your mask. Working 40+ hours a week to make someone else rich. Government. INVESTING (go intelligently against the flow and watch what happens to your portfolio!)

                          It's actually a testament to our resilience and resourcefulness that we're doing as well as we are given we're living in such sub-prime conditions.

                          This is something I've been thinking about a bit lately - there's so much OPPORTUNITY out there because the world is ass-backwards. It's incredible.

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                          • #14
                            That you can't be happy as a single person. That the main goal in a single person's life is to find a mate.

                            I'm not a lone wolf. I have good friends who I see often, a fun family, a great support group for my art and my life. I'm the happiest I've ever been. Far too happy to be in a relationship.
                            If I don't live my dream, who will?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                              The economist John Kenneth Galbraith once defined conventional wisdom as "...that body of beliefs that is assiduously, solemnly, and mindlessly traded among the pretentiously wise."
                              He grew up about 20 minutes from my home...
                              "Be careful what you pretend to be because you are what you pretend to be." Kurt Vonnegut
                              "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." Douglas Adams
                              "Moderation sucks." Suse
                              "Wine is a vegetable." Meaty
                              "Every decision you make, from what you eat to what you do with your time tonight, turns you into who you are tomorrow and the day after that." Cmdr Chris Hadfield


                              Winencandy

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