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Was grok religious?

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  • Was grok religious?

    Just a thought..I myself am grappling with faith right now. How does modern religion fit into the primal lifestyle?

  • #2
    Superstitious? Probably. Religious? Unlikely.

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    • #3
      God knows!
      activate the rhythm, the rhythm that has always been within

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      • #4
        Depends how far back and how primal we are talking here.
        My whole life, I've felt like an animal......but I've ignored my instincts. I ignored what I really am. That will never happen again.

        My blog

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        • #5
          I think Grok read philosophy and was a follower of Peter Singer
          Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

          Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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          • #6
            I feel certain that earliest man (includes male and female) were filled with wonder. Why did day turn into night? Why did animals leave on seasonal migrations? Would they return? What caused seasons to change? Basically, what makes it all happen and why.

            Even primitive people understood cause and effect. Things didn't just happen. There are indications that they believed in some force that they could not fathom controlling things. So those early people "knew" that someone or something had to be causing things to occur. From that religion developed.

            There is an old science fiction story by James Blish. The book is "The Seedling Stars". Casts an interesting light on the question of religion, creation, and the force behind everything in life. It has been out of print for years, but I recommend that you look for it and read it. It really is a cool story. Also, a very short and easy read.

            And, no, it isn't going to offend anyone or support anyone's ideas more than anyone else's. It will be a good read for agnostics, atheists, pagans, and whatever of the major religions you wish to list.
            Tayatha om bekandze

            Bekandze maha bekandze

            Randza samu gate soha

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            • #7
              I think Religion and primal can certainly coexist, "primal" can only encompass what you want it to, for instance, plenty of folks here mostly adhere to the eating part of it, and that's fantastic. Others try to dwelve maybe a little deeper and start changing other aspects of their lives -- they might quit their gyms and start working out in nature, building their own equipment etc, they might start to question other aspects of Conventional Wisdom and making changes accordingly, they might forego shampoo and soap, etc, etc -- but that's not really something anybody's going to request of you. It's a personal choice.

              That being said, I think religion is more a cultural hand-me-down than anything else. I was born in Peru, the entire country is pretty much Catholic and I was brought up that way, around 14-15 I started questioning things a little too much for my mom to like, but I couldn't stop my questions. Ultimately I distanced myself from the church. I figure had I been born anywhere else, or even to a different family I might have a slightly or wildly different set of beliefs. I'd be down with religion if there was just ONE thing that the world collectively agreed on, and wasn't constantly fighting about. It'd be much easier to be agnostic or atheist with less "options" around...
              I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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              • #8
                The earliest form of religion was Animism- where different elements had their own spirits. Rocks, trees, lightning, rain, etc. How and when this began, I have no idea.

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                • #9
                  Its a very good question.. which just proves that humans love to question and think about things. So I also think that Grok would have asked how and why and would have been filled with wonder at the universe. I know I still am. When I look up at the star filled sky I wonder.. yet I know the scientific answers to why.. I am stilled filled with wonder at the whole universe and how it works!

                  Why did Grok make cave paintings? Was it for the fun of it or was it serious business for better hunting? Who knowes?

                  Religious I doubt Grok was, in the terms that we know today. But I do beleive he would have been so very much tied into the natural rythum of the land and himself. He was God unto himself.

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                  • #10
                    I don't know about ancient Grok, but looking at modern day hunter-gatherers is very illuminating. Some groups are very religious, meaning that they not only have creation stories but they have rituals and specific gods that they worship. Other groups, such as the Piraha, are completely irreligious and do not even have a creation story. So religion is a cultural phenomenon, but it stems from a desire to understand the world, something that could really only be explained supernaturally before recent years with the advent of improved science.

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                    • #11
                      To have the luxury of thinking about the universe, you need a full belly. So for Grok to spend time wondering about the universe or take the time to even think about making cave paintings, his belly must have been full. If you are hungry, all you can think about is food. So Grok had leisure time after his hunting and gathering..I just find this interesting.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Coconut View Post
                        To have the luxury of thinking about the universe, you need a full belly. So for Grok to spend time wondering about the universe or take the time to even think about making cave paintings, his belly must have been full. If you are hungry, all you can think about is food. So Grok had leisure time after his hunting and gathering..I just find this interesting.
                        I don't know about that. Lots of religions practice regular fasting. There is a certain clarity of mind that comes with an empty belly.
                        You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                        • #13
                          The moment that man became self aware he began to question and thus religion of one kind or another was created to answer the big questions.
                          My whole life, I've felt like an animal......but I've ignored my instincts. I ignored what I really am. That will never happen again.

                          My blog

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                          • #14
                            I sought religion over 10 years ago (hey, that's a long time for me, I'm only 25), and realized that the more I sought a belief system to match what I wanted, the further from organized religion I went. So I went with a belief system I created by borrowing from many faiths and a couple of my own ideas. As to Grok, I'm more inclined to see him as the Plains Indians were: it wasn't a religion, so much as a very healthy respect for everything around him and a large dose or superstition
                            Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                            My Latest Journal

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                            • #15
                              Organized religions came with agriculture and bigger social structures. Interestingly, their message is usually ''God (or whatever else super being) gave men the land so they could prosper (or something similar)'' so men wouldn't feel bad about killing plants and animals (and generally raping the planet) to grow crops. Religion in hunter-gatherer societies is different in the sense that one of their main messages is ''There is a balance, don't overkill and don't overfeed yourself, every being is a spirit (or something similar) so you have to respect it'' because they couldn't afford to kill every animal in their sight or they would disturb nature's balance and run out of food quickly. There also wasn't the need to control big populations and brainwash them. So, probably a big difference between your concept of ''religion'' and Grok's.

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