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Grass fed meat in Europe?

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  • Grass fed meat in Europe?

    Anyone know of any website that ships grass fed meat to/in Europe?

  • #2
    Yes I would like to know the answer as well. I am from Denmark and we can get quite a lot of organic meat (especially at www.aarstiderne.com) but I am not sure it organic also means grass fed.

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    • #3
      Karna I'm also from Denmark Organic isn't 100% grassfed, no meat from Denmark is since the cows cant graze in the winter. Organic means they are allowed to graze when possible, and I believe their winterfeed is a mix of hay and corn and possibly some other things, so partly grain. Its most likely the best you'll be able to get. I'm personally on standard meat, and I'm convinced its still superior to the american grain fed stuff.

      To the OP I don't know any website or something, but you may want to check out online butchers from Ireland or New Zealand since their meat is most often raised traditionally and hence grass fed.

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      • #4
        I normally live in sweden, and there I have find 2 websites that shipping grass fed beef in Sweden, maybe they ship to Denmark aswell, I will see If I can find the website. Now im living in malta though, and those sites couldnt ship there atleast.

        I mean I dont even know if its possible to ship meat from one country to another, when its from a bussiness to a private person, with customs rules etc, anyone knows the rules for those stuffs?

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        • #5
          Hej Pandadude! So great to meet someone from Denmark going primal! I am looking for some sort of paleo/primal community in DK - if there exist such a thing - do you know of any?

          Jimpag - yes - please share your websites from Sweden. Not sure about the custom rules either.

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          • #6
            As far as I know, no primal/paleo community exists in Denmark The health epidemic isn't as major here as it is in the US (yet), probably because our stable foods (potatoes, whole grain breads) aren't as processed compared to the american white flour + sugar + sweetener freakshows. We might have a more conservative mindset aswell, or maybe the same % of paleo people as in the US just results in an invisible amount of people in Denmark with our lower population density and such.

            I do know Robb Wolf is doing a seminar in Denmark though, but it is fairly expensive (too expensive for a student like me to justify going), here's a link to the post: http://robbwolf.com/2010/06/29/paleo...minar-denmark/
            He gets a lot more technical than Mark Sisson, and his reccomendations are a bit more specific depending on what your goals are... but it's still the paleo gig. I would personally be very satisfied with meat from aarstiderne.dk and I doubt you can get better quality in sweden either (same problems with grass not being available year round). I'd also note that wild game such as deer is very primal, as is fish bought at a real fish stand.

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            • #7
              Thanks for sharing.

              I'll stick with Aarstiderne which definately has some delicious meat - just tried their "Skafte Kotelet". Wauw - it was good!

              And yes - the paleo gig is pretty expensive. Some of the cross fit training centres might as well have a local crowd of paleo/primal people.

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              • #8
                Air-dried reindeer meat should be readily available from Norway, Sweden or Finland.

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                • #9
                  Hi, im from europe too. Has anybody found out where to buy/order grass fed meat in Europe?

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                  • #10
                    In Sweden they have grass fed beef from 'KC-Ranch' in the supermarket ICA Maxi.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Karna View Post
                      Yes I would like to know the answer as well. I am from Denmark and we can get quite a lot of organic meat (especially at Aarstiderne - frugtkasser, grøntsagskasser og måltidskasser leveret til døren) but I am not sure it organic also means grass fed.
                      Mee too

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                      • #12
                        hey, Germany here :-)
                        The only grass-fed beef I can find here is the Wagyu one, that anyway is labelled just "grass fed" and not "100% grass fed".... On top of that it is quite expensive and hard to find (I usually buy it at "Metro", that is present also in other European countries, but I remember to have it seen also in some German online shops)
                        Besides that, I always go for beef coming from Argentina or New Zealand, that "should" be grass-fed. Or for bison from Canada

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                        • #13
                          HI there, I am a newbie from Ireland. Irish beef is almost entirely grass fed, over winter most animals are moved indoors and fed silage. Silage is the modern replacement for hay, it's grass cut in the summer when it is full of sugars and wrapped in plastic so that it ferments, cows seem to love it.

                          Farmers raise calves until they are nearly big enough for butchering when they are sold on for "finishing".
                          I do not know what the finishers feed the animals, I will ask my farming neighbours. I suspect that they are fed some grains as well as grass to fatten them, when I know what they are fed I will post it here.

                          Irish mountain lamb is almost entirely grass fed, weather dependant many live outdoors and reasonably wild for their entire life. Sheep where I live roam the hills until either it becomes so cold and snowy (as in the last two winters) that the farmer comes looking for them and feeds them calf nuts (some sort of grain compressed into nuggets), sometimes bringing them closer to home where their grass diet is probably supplemented with calf nuts unless there is hay available or the grass re-emerges from the snow. I don't think that sheep eat silage - again when i find out I will post that here.
                          PaleoIrish

                          Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you've imagined. As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler.
                          Henry David Thoreau

                          I blog here sometimes: http://paleoirish.com/
                          http://twitter.com/#!/PaleoIrish

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                          • #14
                            Now I may say something really stupid but I just need to ask...
                            I heard a lot about the quality of Irish meat but, having lived in England when the mad-cow disease problem came out, I have always been a bit freaked out about meat coming from the UK in general... Was Ireland also affected by the mad-cow disease??

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                            • #15
                              Hi fra0039, a good school teacher once told me there is no such thing as a stupid question and this is actually a good question. I was living in England around the time of Mad Cow Disease too and it was a bit freaky, I certainly didn't eat any beef there, sticking to lamb which I hope was healthier. I didn't eat meat often then anyway and I have to admit I am finding it a bit weird eating as much meat as I am at the moment but I am sticking with it.

                              Ireland wasn't affected by the Mad Cow disease thing, perhaps because of the emphasis on pasture feeding the livestock.

                              I met my neighbour today and asked about how the animals are "finished" for market - he said they are mostly grazed outdoors unless the weather prohibits it, in which case they are fed silage. A lot of that beef is being prepared now and most will be butchered between now and Christmas. Those that are kept for longer are put back out to grass as soon as the weather allows and are mostly fed silage while indoors. I guess some farmers may feed grain but nowhere near the levels that they do in the USA.
                              PaleoIrish

                              Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you've imagined. As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler.
                              Henry David Thoreau

                              I blog here sometimes: http://paleoirish.com/
                              http://twitter.com/#!/PaleoIrish

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