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  • #91
    Originally posted by slacker View Post
    And another thing...
    The one that raises my blood pressure the worst is "pleaded". Nooooooooo!!!!!! It is "pled", damn it!
    I agree. The other one that bugs me is "prolly". It's "PROBABLY".

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    • #92
      Originally posted by scubasam View Post
      Didn't read the whole thread so I apologize if these have already been mentioned.

      One of my pet peeves is 'I could care less'. This makes NO SENSE whatsoever. The correct term is 'I couldn't care less'.

      .
      This one gets me too. Since you COULD care less, then you do care about it some now? Why are you telling me?

      I wish people typing on phones would learn to proofread before they send. Auto correct does not work very well! The first I heard about the shootings in Arizona was from my cousin's Facebook post where he said something about "fun control." Proofread people! Proofread.

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      • #93
        My personal pet peeve is people who can't figure out the difference between "literally" and "figuratively". For example: "I was so surprised that I literally dropped dead." Um, no. Had you literally dropped dead you wouldn't be here telling me about it.

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        • #94
          Oh yes, that one makes my head literally explode. (Terrible job cleaning the carpet afterwards.)

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          • #95
            Originally posted by Hilary View Post
            Oh yes, that one makes my head literally explode. (Terrible job cleaning the carpet afterwards.)
            chortle, chortle

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            • #96
              My husband and I were just lamenting the death of the preposition rule. Everyone ends sentences with prepositions now. Even Grammar Girl says it's ok now. http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com...positions.aspx

              She says, "Here's an example of a sentence that can end with a preposition: What did you step on? A key point, you might say the Quick and Dirty Tip, is that the sentence doesn't work if you leave off the preposition. You can't say, “What did you step?” You need to say, “What did you step on?” to make a grammatical sentence.
              I can hear some of you gnashing your teeth right now, while you think, “What about saying, 'On what did you step?'” But really, have you ever heard anyone talk that way?"

              The answer is, I talk that way. Actually, I would probably phrase it "Upon what did you step?" But wince when I say it, because I know it sounds odd to everyone else, but as Popeye says, "I yam what I yam."

              While we're at it, there is no such thing as reiterate, just like there's no irregardless. Iterate means to say something again. So if you're making your point for a second or third or eighteenth time, you're still just iterating.
              junebu8's journ@l

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              • #97
                It must be somewhere here in this thread, but I haven't read all of it yet, so you get it again...

                a plural is NOT formed by adding an apostrophe-"s"!

                If I see that just one more time, on any sign, anywhere in this redneck county in which I live, I just may resort to becoming a graffiti artist at the ripe old age of 45!

                I'm not perfect, but THAT is elementary-school stuff!!!
                I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                • #98
                  I always try to proof read before I post, and will catch a your/you're mistake, and correct it, since I don't want to sound ignorant.

                  The best one I saw was at a McD drive thru (not for me...) was a posted sign about the "hearing and speach impaired", I guess the sign makers are spelling impaired.
                  Last edited by Rusty; 12-19-2012, 07:31 AM. Reason: didn't proof read...duh

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                  • #99
                    Every time I see "use to" instead of "used to", I just want to scream. I mean, literally. Come on, If I could've learned how it's spelled/said with English being my second language, so can everybody else.
                    ..

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                    • Originally posted by Graycat View Post
                      Every time I see "use to" instead of "used to", I just want to scream. I mean, literally. Come on, If I could've learned how it's spelled/said with English being my second language, so can everybody else.
                      ..
                      Just curious... first language is...??
                      I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by junebu8 View Post
                        My husband and I were just lamenting the death of the preposition rule. Everyone ends sentences with prepositions now.
                        This must be something to do with American English. That construction is common in English English -- and as far back as you like to go:

                        So stant Custance, and looketh hire aboute.

                        Chaucer: "The Man of Law's Tale"
                        Of course, the word order there is rather dictated by the rhyming pattern. The word "about" (in the 14th century pronounced "aboot", of course) is put where it is to rhyme with "route" which ends the previous line.

                        But there's nothing very odd about that word order, and I could probably find some examples where the word order sounds more natural than that in very old texts if I chose to look.

                        It's true that Dryden at some point went back through all his writings and changed them all, moving every "to" (and so forth) behind the "which" (or whatever) to which it related ... or which it was related to.

                        But why do that?

                        Apparently, Dryden did it because that would how things would be in Latin -- because "by which", "of which", "from which" can't be "split" because they're one word, because Latin is an inflected language. So what? English doesn't work like that.

                        Why try to put English in a Latin strait-jacket?

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                        • Originally posted by scubasam View Post
                          Another is the use of the word then instead of than (I'd rather go to the range THAN the movies, too many people use 'then the movies').
                          ARRRGHHH! This one drives me crazy!
                          Breathe. Move forward.

                          I just eat what I want...

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                          • I don't really mind much on live chats, message boards, etc. What irks the crap outta me (heh), is "between she and I," used in books, magazines, television, etc. Children may learn grammar in school, but they really learn it by what they hear and read, so it bothers me a lot when so called professional writers get it wrong. For just plain folks, all I ask is the occasional paragraph break so my eyes don't turn the post into some kind of psychedelic design.
                            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                            B*tch-lite

                            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                            • Supposably. The word is supposedly, thank you very much.
                              The Smith’s. Abuse of apostrophes has already been referenced. You know those darling carved wood placards attached to an RV or residence? Is part of the sign missing? Is it supposed to read The Smith’s house? Is there only one Smith and this is his house? Or is this the one and only Smith’s cat? Has part of the sign fallen off? Suddenly, I am filled with rage, and wish to confront the Smith about this mysterious and incomplete proclamation.
                              Less than 15 items. Yes, it’s an express lane, but fewer is the word you’re looking for. Same with less calories.
                              Ice tea. Similar to the use to/used to issue. Is the tea literally made by steeping leaves in ice? If so, how is this possible? Rather, the tea brew has been iced with hardened cubes of water to make it cold.

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                              • Originally posted by excursivey View Post
                                ARRRGHHH! This one drives me crazy!
                                Perhaps I'd rather go to the range then the movies, than to the movies then the range.

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