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Grammar-Nazis

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  • #46
    Originally posted by cerebelumsdayoff View Post
    Poor apostrophes too. How many plurals have you seen where the writer sticks an unnecessary apostrophe in there out of sheer confusion? Fruit's and vegetable's on sale this weekend only!
    Originally posted by gottaluvalab View Post
    It is my experience that most young writers have somehow learned (or decided on their own) that apostrophes are a decorative item of some sort rather than punctuation that aids in clarity.
    Apostrophy Abuse is everywhere! Some of these signs are pretty amazing.
    312/149/150

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    • #47
      +1 for apostrophe abuse. Particularly the insidious 'it's' when they mean 'its', e.g. "The dog ate it's dinner." (should be its, the test being if you'd write 'his' or 'her', you use 'its').

      My current pet hate is "bored of". I've always used "bored with" and I'm sure there's some subtle grammatical reason why it is more correct to do the latter. But 'bored of' is becoming increasingly common usage.

      My other pet hate is Americanization of all English. A great many English speakers use British English, or the Canadian, Australian or South African (and New Zealand) variants thereof. I fear that we'll all gradually lose our individuality - along with the historical subtleties conveyed by the interesting original spellings - and succumb to generic American.
      If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

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      • #48
        Originally posted by geekgrrl View Post
        +1

        My other pet hate is Americanization of all English. A great many English speakers use British English, or the Canadian, Australian or South African (and New Zealand) variants thereof. I fear that we'll all gradually lose our individuality - along with the historical subtleties conveyed by the interesting original spellings - and succumb to generic American.
        I agree! I love my neighbour's grey aeroplane!
        The more I see the less I know for sure.
        -John Lennon

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        • #49
          I disagree with the notion of "proper" grammar, language, and spelling. Language is in a state of constant, neverending evolution. The concept of "proper" anything is about as vacuous as the concept of racial and cultural purity.
          “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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          • #50
            Perhaps those of us who were lucky enough to be taught English well could be a bit more forgiving of those who weren't so lucky. Poor grammar can be a handicap throughout life. I live in France and I find that a lot of Anglophones struggle to learn French because they have a poor understanding of their own language. I also teach English to French adults, and very often a grammar rule will be different for British English and American English (and other variants).
            Languages are evolving all the time, so there are no absolutes, just guide lines. However, the purpose of grammar is to enable clear communication. Some people can do that quite well on text speak!
            It's still nice to have a rant though isn't it? I'M LOVIN IT

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            • #51
              I think there's a difference between lacking education or ability and just not caring; there's a wilful disregard for good English, as though it's something only snobs or pedants should care about.

              And it's also not a matter of being recalcitrant about absolutes: much of the 'change' is simply loss - we lose nuances, subtleties as words fall from disuse or lose layers of meaning.
              If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

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              • #52
                The misuse of "i.e." and "e.g." irks me for some reason.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by Mica
                  i don't like when i see typing like this.when people omit spaces between sentences.somehow,by putting commas or periods,the need for hitting the space bar is negated.???
                  I wonder if some people are posting via their cell phones which would made proper punctuation and spacing more difficult? Or maybe some are so used to texting that they forgot how to write correctly?
                  312/149/150

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                  • #54
                    Important, I understand good grammar is. To the dark side of the force arrogance however leads. With dyslexia, walk a mile in the shoes of a man. Hmmmmmm.
                    Strive for healthy today.

                    Satisfaction is the death of desire.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by jeffy87 View Post
                      The misuse of "i.e." and "e.g." irks me for some reason.
                      I suspect a lot of people have never even been taught it - anything that smacks of Latin is dropped like a hot-potato whenever possible. I found a handy reminder on a website once: "e.g. = "example given" and i.e. = "in effect". Now that you mention it, I can't think of an instance when I've seen i.e. used correctly. I think they've become interchangeable in popular usage.

                      OH the other one I HATE with a mad passion - present historical tense. "I go to the shop. There's a man standing there at the counter. I say to him, "You're in my grammatical example." He laughs."

                      It's a device that is SUPPOSED to be used in small doses - when a person is excitedly relating a past event or to heighten the effect. But now loads of whole novels are being written in it. There's a series of teen Dance School novels I picked up at the bookstore - nope, present historical. The whole series. Had to put them back. I've seen quite a few biographical type stories written the same way. And people speaking in it - all the damn time - on reality television. I could barely watch the current season of Masterchef because the scriptwriters have the contestants using it constantly.

                      WHY??? Is it to make it more exciting? Is it because it's easier for people with English as a second language? I fear that it's infecting the whole literary industry. I may never be able to read a novel written after 2012. Yes, it's the end of the world as I know it.

                      Regarding the internet, forums, chat, run-on speech and so on - I really don't care about typos and 'dodgy' grammar in this context, as we're writing vast quantities quickly. There's a difference between train-of-thought and sheer stupidity.
                      If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

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                      • #56
                        I feel compelled to share this little gem with all of you:
                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7E-a...ayer_embedded#!

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                        • #57
                          Regional and national differences really bug me, if I'm in that frame of mind.

                          E.g. ( ) our own Mr Sisson, in the PB, says things like "....most everyone knows...." ".....most all vegetables are fine...."
                          Is this an example of American? I'm tempted to find a red pen and go around making it "...ALmost everyone knows..." "...ALmost all vegetables are fine..."

                          Homophones are a pet peeve; yet I struggle with its and it's.

                          Mind you, I've no idea how to pronounce several place names near me - English is stoooopid!!

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                          • #58
                            I am on the irregardless bandwagon here. That drive sme up a wall.

                            As a person that can't type and has a processing error where I often transpose letters, and even type out a totally inappropriate word I still get annoyed when the grammar is so bad it hurts my eyes. I use spell check mos tof the time. Sometimes my typing is worse than others (and sometimes I use then, and than wrong- did I this time?!?!), but I try to edit my stuff before posting because I really don't want to sound like a moron. Plus, people take you more sriously if you appear educated, even if you didn't graduate from high school.
                            Meghan

                            My MDA journal

                            Primal Ponderings- my blog- finally added some food pron :P

                            And best of all my Body Fat Makeover!!

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by NutMeg View Post
                              As a person that can't type and has a processing error where I often transpose letters, and even type out a totally inappropriate word I still get annoyed when the grammar is so bad it hurts my eyes.
                              I can't stand run-on sentences. :P

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                              • #60
                                I was a straight A Classics scholar at school and it's the pluralisation of things we stole from Latin and Greek which get up my schnozz.

                                I find myself SCREAMING at the telly when I hear a footie pundit, or other sports commentator talk about 'stadiums' - the plural is STADIA!!

                                Millennium - millennia
                                Forum - fora (yep!)
                                Cranium - crania
                                Memorandum - memoranda
                                Curriculum - curricula
                                Erratum - errata
                                Bacterium - bacteria

                                But how many of you know that 'opera' is plural? The singular is 'opus'. The other one which gets me is 'panini' - again, it's plural, the singular is 'panino'.


                                The other which bugs me is the use of 'disinterested' as a synonym for 'uninterested'; the former means 'to remain impartial/neutral' and you all know the meaning of the latter.

                                A good way to remember it is as follows: - A football referee must remain disinterested, but not uninterested, in the match.

                                Just thought of another: - 'discreet' and 'discrete' - they have totally different meanings and aren't interchangeable. 'Discreet' means 'unobtrusive/circumspect', 'discrete' means 'separate and distinct'. Unfortunately, it's very easy to turn one into the other by poor typing!

                                It's a funny language: - the plural of nucleus is nuclei, yet the plural of octopus is octopuses, NOT octopi.

                                The ending which seems to catch the most out is going from '-a' (singular) to '-ae' (plural) as in supernova/supernovae, amoeba/amoebae, alga/algae, etc.

                                Finally, the plural of 'virus' is 'viruses', NOT 'virii' (that means something totally different (it's actually the origin of 'virility', so that should give you some idea!)

                                Chima - your sig has always bugged the hell out of me - there's a question mark missing (as there is in your post); and it's THEIR finances (their = possessive, there = positional/directional, they're = contraction of 'they are').

                                Unless the person's dyslexic, poor grammar, spelling, punctuation and sentence construction (I berate myself when I end a sentence with a preposition, for example) is a direct reflection on that person's intelligence and attitude towards work and life in general. I have a friend who's severely dyslexic but, apart from a few words, you'd never know it these days; so if she can do it, and she has an excuse, there's no excuse for those who don't.

                                If the first impression someone is going to have of you is something you've written (e.g. a job application letter, or your CV) then you can bet your sweet arse the first thing they're going to take into consideration is how it's written and constructed! You could be the most intelligent person on Earth but, if your grasp of basic English is poor, you're not going to go too far...

                                Pedantic Pennys and Pedantic Peters of the world unite!
                                La tristesse durera toujours...

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