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Killing Your Own Meat?

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  • #16
    Just a tip for those of you with chicken necks on the chopping block. The best way to do that is to mount a large metal funnel to a post or wall about five feet off the ground with the narrow side down. Have a bucket below the funnel. Gently place your bird head first into the funnel and pull the head through. It will generally just pop out. Neck exposed. Firmly hold the head pulling down with a little pressure and ne clean swipe with a razor sharp knife removes the head and bleeds the bird into the bucket. No misfiring. No running around with heads chopped off. Very simple. I've done twenty in a couple minutes like this. Others were plucking and cleaning thankfully.

    I've done a lot of bird hunting and fishing in my life. Killing, cleaning and eating either is about the same as picking, cleaning and eating zucchini.

    Field dressing a big buck is definitely a different experience. It is a little disgusting, a little emotional, and perhaps even spiritual. I think everyone who eats a lot of wild game should make that first incision from the genitals to the sternum at least once. Open him up and turn him on his side so the guts spill out. Then give the knife to a master and pay very close attention to the handling of the intestines, bowels, bladder, and rectum. Learn to cut the fat away and remove the heart and lungs in one clean tidy piece. Done right it is a respectful harvest. Done wrong can be a smelly mess that spoils the meat.

    I joked about harvesting a wild burro in the eat a horse thread, but when I seriously considered it, I really didn't want to field dress a donkey in 100 degree weather, drag it to my truck and try to set something up in my backyard to butcher the animal. The legality of it didn't bother me as much as the mess and urgency I would have had to deal with to do it right.

    I took a wild boar in Hawaii a few years ago and my guide just carved out the hams, shoulders and loins on the spot leaving the rest of the carcass to the rain forest. That was kind of interesting (no gutting and cleaning), and the best fresh meat I have ever eaten. I asked about the bacon/belly and he said wild boars didn't have bacon. I would like to revisit that notion some day.

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    • #17
      I've been considering this very same dilemma. I've never purposefully killed anything in my life, and I'm an animal lover...but since becoming primal...I don't know...every animal I look at I find myself wondering how it will taste. I found out that these wild ducks that populate our neighborhoods (and are a real pain in the butt) are supposed to be really tasty. I've been wanting to try to catch one...but I'm very unsure about how I'm going to feel about it when it comes right down to it. I'd like to think that I will be able to step up to the plate...like Diana said...if I'm going to be a meat eater then I should be able to kill it.

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      • #18
        My husband and I are getting the last things set up to breed rabbits for slaughter. When I kill an animal to eat I make sure to use as much of the animal as possible – everything else seems like a waste and too much like the ‘buy and throw away’ mentality that I really don’t like about society.

        I can love and care for an animal while it’s alive and then enjoy it, after I kill it. I think it’s the simple respect for the life and what’s left after life is gone. I could eat my own dog if it was necessary.

        Autumn

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Autumn View Post
          My husband and I are getting the last things set up to breed rabbits for slaughter. When I kill an animal to eat I make sure to use as much of the animal as possible – everything else seems like a waste and too much like the ‘buy and throw away’ mentality that I really don’t like about society.

          I can love and care for an animal while it’s alive and then enjoy it, after I kill it. I think it’s the simple respect for the life and what’s left after life is gone. I could eat my own dog if it was necessary.

          Autumn
          Any left over parts of the animal can be used as fertiliser if you have a garden. Or you could feed them to animals, such as dogs, chickens, turkeys, cats or pigs.
          A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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          • #20
            A funny saying comes to mind "If god didn't want us to kill animals he wouldn't have made them out of meat". I've hunted and processed my own meat all my life. We have become to far seperated from the rendering process in modern times and hollywood has made us scared of blood. In years past if you didn't kill the animal yourself you didn't eat. My grandmother could ring a chickens neck and have it gutted , scalled and ready to cook before you could start your car to go to the grocer. It's all a part of the process, if your taught properly how to do it , it's very satisfying to render your own sustinance.

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            • #21
              I used to hunt for rabbits and squirrels on my family's farm when I was a child. My grandparents lived there and we came to visit them. Cleaning the games was something that my grandfather and I did together and somehow brought us closer together. I never enjoyed the killing part and I'd always go for head shots and do anything that I could keep an animal from ongoing pain. I could still kill to eat, but I don't enjoy hurting things and I take no pleasure in it.
              http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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              • #22
                An interesting read for anyone comtemplating the ethics of humans killing animals, is "The Raptor and the Lamb: Predators and Prey in the Living World" by Christopher McGowan.

                McGowan, Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Royal Ontario Museum in Totonto and professor of zoology at U of Toronto, explores the essence of predator-prey relationships, taking you on a guided tour through the very different but often overlapping worlds of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, plants, insects, and microorganisms, as well as fossilized records of the dinosaurs. We learn, in every instance, not only the intricacies of interdependence in the vast chain of being but also the astonishing adaptabiltiy that is inherent in nature, weather the drama be played out on the African plains, in the depths of the ocean, or in the familiar confines of our own backyard.

                Helen in Oz: Its interesting, to have to address the question of whether or not our advanced self-awareness and ability to have rational thought somehow elevates us to the top of the food chain. Does it? Non-meat eaters are quick to say this is it just our hubris as a species supplying a convenient excuse to dine on the less intellegient beings on our planet. I disagree with them. Animals dining on other animals is a constant in nature, it is the driving force of all ecosystems, as much as water is the driving force of all life on earth in the first place. Its easy to forget this, as we are separated from our animal brethren, and live our lives in comfortable isolation from the harsh realities of nature. McGowans book has reminded me that, yes, humans are not all that special or unique physiologically. While our minds have developed, our bodies are still animal bodies, ones that require animal nourishment. It is in my opinion that vegans and vegetarians are the ones that take on a holier-than-thou position, not the meat eaters, as they reject the notion that we are intrinsically tied to nature and the earth, and assume we are somehow excused from the great web of life due to our intellegience. We are all one on this planet, and I believe that consumming animals for nourishment is one of the most natural things we can do. To say otherwise........to suggest that humans are somehow "better" than this....is the real hubris.


                Just an example of how shelterd we are to the facts of nature (the bloody, gorey facts!) Here is an excerpt from the section on orcas, or killer whales, from McGowan's book.

                What images do we associate with orcas? Sea World? Free Willy? We are in denial, as a species, about the true nature of animals (including ourselves). Enjoy:

                page 73, chapter "Death at Sea"

                "A pod of killer whales cruises off the rocky california coast on a spring morning, about one mile from shore. They are seven in number and include an adult males and two calves. He is easily distiguished from the females by his tall, straight dorsal fin. They are probably a family unit. Their course lies parallel to the shore, and they seem to be in no hurry.

                They maintain the same course and speed for almost an hour. Then, for no apparant reason, they make a right angeled turn and head for shore. Their previous progress had been orderly, maintaining a discreet formation, but they are now spreading out on a broad crescentic fron, leaping and gamboling in the water like children at play. And now the reason for their change in behavior becomes apparant: they have intercepted a large herd of sea lions. The sea lions are no match for the killer whales, and their only salvation lies in reaching the land. In their desperation to reach safety, they abandon their usual mode of swimming and pare porpoising along the surface at great speed. The whales swim beside them, dive beneath them, and cut in front of them, apparently having the time of their lives. The sea lions are obviosly terrified, but the whales seem to be playing with them. One of the whales leaps right out of the water, clean over the top of a fleeing pinniped, leanding with a resounding splash several yards ahead of it. Sometimes a tormentor bumps up against a sea lion, knocking it off course. Another time a killer whale dives and surfaces directly beneath one, sending it flying in the air. These exuberant antics may appear to be random, but the killer whale's sport is not without purpose. Their crescentic formation has been getting narrower-they are herding the sea lions closer together.

                The pinnipeds, now in a tight formation, are close to exhaustion, but their tormentors seem to have energy to spare. The game seems destined to continue until the sea lions have hauled up on land - they only have 100 yards to go - but then the killing begins. Like so many cats with so many mice, the whales throw themselves at the sea lions, biting and slashing, mauling and dismembering, so that the sea foams red with their frenzy. Each whale spends the minimum amount of time with its prey before moving on to the next, and within a few minutes, all the sea lions are dead.

                Torn bodies heave and tumble in the swell. A ragged torso, trailing a knot of bloated intestines, bobs against a severed head. Flocks of gulls swoop and dive, screeching raucously as they pick over the spoils. The whales, the killing done and their former demeanor restored, swim slowly through the carnage as if witnessing the deeds of others. They begin to feed unhurriedly. Each one will leave with a full stomach."


                Orcas are highly intellegient beings, capable of problem solving, and advanced group hunting techniques. Should we expect them, as well, to abadon the killing, just because they are intellectually superior to their prey? This scene is not one of notable horror or maliciousness. This is business as usual for nature, and vegetarians, seem to forget that THIS is the norm, not the other way around. If all killing were to cease on Earth, the planet would die.
                Last edited by lmyers04; 06-12-2010, 09:44 AM.

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                • #23
                  i am a way empathetic person. like, growing up i thought my *stuffed animals* had feelings. while i do recognize that my meat on my plate comes from killing, i dont know if i could do it myself. however, i have been pushing my own personal comfort levels over the past few years, so at some point i'd like to try it.

                  and then go hug my teddy bear.
                  sigpic

                  HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

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                  • #24
                    The only hesitation I have about killing for food is the fear of messing up and leaving a wounded animal.
                    I've killed a chicken (using this method http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UahVDgXszyM ) and it was okay. I hunt rabbits but haven't got one yet! Anything bigger and I'm not sure... I'd like to, but it'd take years to get through the red tape.

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                    • #25
                      I'm enjoying reading the responses. I often think about many of these things myself.

                      I would love to learn how to hunt and butcher my own meat. I imagine that I'd be somewhat shocked at the process at first, but eventually I'd get used to it.

                      If I were to ever encounter a vegetarian/vegan I would ask them to step in front of a lion as it prepares to dine on a gazelle and explain why eating meat is wrong and how much of a bad animal they are. Maybe they could get their point across that way.

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                      • #26
                        What snobbery. I have known many vegetarians. They did not disparage me for eating meat. They lived their lives and let me have mine. They didn't consider me to be a brainless entity. Not so with too many of you folk on this forum. If it isn't your style, it has no worth and would only be considered by clowns and brainless simpletons. Who is acting brainless and simple?

                        I live and have lived following this sort of diet "forever". I need to remind you that science changes regularly. Perhaps what we have is just today's CW. Tell me it works so it is great. Then tell me that apple cider vinegar can't be good even though it works because your CW is against it. There are many people on many systems who are living well and thriving. They usually don't consider themselves superior to the rest of the world.

                        Grow up.
                        In the game of Rock, Paper, Scissors

                        shotgun always wins.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Gator View Post
                          What snobbery. I have known many vegetarians. They did not disparage me for eating meat. They lived their lives and let me have mine. They didn't consider me to be a brainless entity. Not so with too many of you folk on this forum. If it isn't your style, it has no worth and would only be considered by clowns and brainless simpletons. Who is acting brainless and simple?

                          I live and have lived following this sort of diet "forever". I need to remind you that science changes regularly. Perhaps what we have is just today's CW. Tell me it works so it is great. Then tell me that apple cider vinegar can't be good even though it works because your CW is against it. There are many people on many systems who are living well and thriving. They usually don't consider themselves superior to the rest of the world.

                          Grow up.
                          +1 people on this board do tend to be on a high horse. I swear and live by this lifestyle, but I find a lot of us are to quick to discredit others. I may not agree, for example, with certain religions, but you will never catch me talking down to others beliefs. Live by your life that you love, listen to others opinions, and respect them, no matter how different. Its to his/her own to find their root through life, and there is no right or wrong way. Our way just happens to be the primal way
                          sigpic

                          Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free
                          Silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands
                          With all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves
                          Let me forget about today until tomorrow

                          MY PRIMAL JOURNAL
                          MY PUBLIC FITDAY JOURNAL

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                          • #28
                            The only way I'd kill an animal is by shooting it from a distance. I don't think I could grab it and kill it... but shooting it would be fucking fun. With a sniper... But then where would I shoot? Head? I want to eat the brains. Heart? I want to eat it too.
                            .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
                            ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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                            • #29
                              My first attempt of preparing a killed animal was a time when my neighbor hit a pheasant with his car. He of course stopped the car, tracked down the wounded animal, and put an end to its agony. As he knows were economically challenged he came in and handed me this beautiful bird and said that dinner was on him. I was nervous. The animal was dead, yes, so I couldn’t hurt it, but I had never stripped a carcass before. I did, however, get a good insight into anatomy. I think what threw me off the most was that when I opened up the animal and removed internal organs etc. it didn’t look like the chickens I had seen my mom prepare when I was a child. The reason was that this animal was mortally wounded: broken hips, ribs, bleedings in the musculature etc. It made me think about life; especially the fact that this life had ended not long before, and that it was an accident that lead to a mercy kill that lead to my dinner. The cow in the butcher’s cooler often dies a horrible death. This animal didn’t … compare to the cow. This may sound odd, but I felt strangely honored to eat that night; having had the still warm body to prepare in my hands only hours earlier.

                              Our dog got the rest and she looked happy too.

                              Autumn

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                              • #30
                                It's all about respect for life. As a kid I was fishing a lot, both inland and at sea, and whenever we caught some we treated the fish with respect and made the kill and butchering as clean as possible. Why? It would otherwise be unnecessary suffering for the animal, and waste of food as the meat usually gets bad if not treated right. Then the kill would be pointless and without respect.

                                Same goes for land living animals, even though the animals I kill now a days aren't for consuming as it is usually my cats that brings home mice and birds. I always feel bad for those, because they are an unnecessary kill. Except for ending their suffering.

                                <rant mode>
                                The worst thing I see is the hunter putting his foot on the carcass, gun in one hand bragging about his kill while having his photograph taken. Come autumn and the local newspaper is full of that shit. WTF is up with that? It is without the respect for the life you've just taken and a hunt should not be about trophy, but sustenance. Rejoice in the happiness that your stomach once will be fed, and be happy to share with the rest of your "tribe". Don't disrespect the life you took.
                                </rant mode>

                                Phew - good to have it off my chest.
                                Sometimes you need to be told the truth in order to be able to see it.

                                My journal

                                I see grain people...

                                Exist in shadow, drifting away.

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