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  • Okinawan diet?

    Hey ya'll- I'm loving the primal life so far (almost 2 weeks), but my partner thinks the Okinawan diet is the best because the island boasts so many youthful centarians. While I know the diet has some things in common with pb, there are a lot of differences, namely that the Japanese islanders eat a lot of low fat soups, tofu, have unlimited rice and sweet potato consumption, and limit red meat. Anyone familiar with the Okinawan diet and have some insight? Seems like they also have figured out a way to live long and prosper...


    Sent from my yoga mat

  • #2
    I always take those statistics with a grain of salt. For all we know the Okinawan's may have better genetics, less stress, better air quality, more walking, etc. They may live a long time in spite of their diet.
    Last edited by miata; 12-03-2014, 11:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by saraholistichealing View Post
      Hey ya'll- I'm loving the primal life so far (almost 2 weeks), but my partner thinks the Okinawan diet is the best because the island boasts so many youthful centarians. While I know the diet has some things in common with pb, there are a lot of differences, namely that the Japanese islanders eat a lot of low fat soups, tofu, have unlimited rice and sweet potato consumption, and limit red meat. Anyone familiar with the Okinawan diet and have some insight? Seems like they also have figured out a way to live long and prosper...


      Sent from my yoga mat
      Lol...that ain't the diet that got them healthy.

      It's this one!
      Last edited by Neckhammer; 12-03-2014, 06:16 PM.

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      • #4
        Interesting! That article has different info than The Okinawan Diet Plan, which basically advocates a low fat diet high in veggies, soy, sweet potatoes, rice, and fish. I wonder why the discrepancy. The author had lived among the Okinawans for awhile and studied their diet and lifestyle.

        Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
        Lol...that ain't the diet that got them healthy.

        It's this one!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by saraholistichealing View Post
          Interesting! That article has different info than The Okinawan Diet Plan, which basically advocates a low fat diet high in veggies, soy, sweet potatoes, rice, and fish. I wonder why the discrepancy. The author had lived among the Okinawans for awhile and studied their diet and lifestyle.
          Everybody with a diet agenda claims that that there's is close to the Okinawan diet.
          Last edited by miata; 12-03-2014, 11:08 PM.

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          • #6
            Pretty sure they eat a LOT of fish over there. You didn't mention that but I'm absolutely certain that's a feature.

            Anyway. It depends on how much carbs you can tolerate, which is quite individual. Sometimes you know... Inuit ancestry? You probably shouldn't be eating that many carbs. Already diabetic? Probably not. Try it out and see how you do.
            Out of context quote for the day:

            Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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            • #7
              Lots of fish. Soy would be fermented or a condiment NOT the way veg@ns today use it.
              Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
              PS
              Don't forget to play!

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              • #8
                It's a correlation, so it doesn't mean anything
                My opinions and some justification

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                • #9
                  From the page Neck linked to, if you didn't click on it:
                  Okinawan culture not only embraces one of the most heart-healthy diets (high seafood, animal meat, milk, eggs, saturated fats, high minerals and low carb) but also a very physically active lifestyle. Additionally, like other long-living societies, they display a distinct community spirit and lifestyle that values every members' contributions including elders, daily prayer, frequent festivals honoring ancestral spirits, playing/dancing (Bali, Polynesian style) regularly, exercising/tai chi together, working diligently until the day they pass away, hot baths (sweat out toxins) daily, avid music listening, folkmusic singing, instrument playing (sanshin) and is tied around all generations of extended families yet promotes self-sufficiency and self-reliance. Traditional Okinawan livelihoods and common activities are still farming, fishing and gardening.
                  They eat a lot of pork, too.

                  One thing that really bugs me is you have these traditional diets like the Okinawan or the Mediterranean (as if there's only one diet in the Mediterranean region) but modern medicine totally undoes all that is good about these diets. They take out the lard, reduce the fat and oils, take out the red meat, stuff it full of beans and soy, tell you to eat a lot of pasta and starch, create recipes with broccoli and other vegetables and fruits they don't even have in those regions, and then don't even wonder why it doesn't work.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                    From the page Neck linked to, if you didn't click on it:


                    They eat a lot of pork, too.

                    One thing that really bugs me is you have these traditional diets like the Okinawan or the Mediterranean (as if there's only one diet in the Mediterranean region) but modern medicine totally undoes all that is good about these diets. They take out the lard, reduce the fat and oils, take out the red meat, stuff it full of beans and soy, tell you to eat a lot of pasta and starch, create recipes with broccoli and other vegetables and fruits they don't even have in those regions, and then don't even wonder why it doesn't work.
                    +1
                    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
                    PS
                    Don't forget to play!

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                    • #11
                      Chances are that if you took the SAD with its multitude of processed foods, bad oils, wheat, and added sugars, and substituted any way of eating that included clean (organic, grass fed, unprocessed) foods and at least an hour of conscious movement (like an evening or morning walk) every day, you'd improve the health of 50+% of all the people in the U.S. (and maybe the U.K.).

                      It's not rocket science. We've devolved into sedentary beasts eating fake food. That's a very low bar. Change either and improve; change both and improve a lot.

                      Correlation does not equal causation is true. It's also a great bumper sticker. If we look at an entire culture and their health markers are exceptional, we'd have less than common sense to not take note whether or not we've tested it in a lab.
                      "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                      B*tch-lite

                      Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                        From the page Neck linked to, if you didn't click on it:


                        They eat a lot of pork, too.

                        One thing that really bugs me is you have these traditional diets like the Okinawan or the Mediterranean (as if there's only one diet in the Mediterranean region) but modern medicine totally undoes all that is good about these diets. They take out the lard, reduce the fat and oils, take out the red meat, stuff it full of beans and soy, tell you to eat a lot of pasta and starch, create recipes with broccoli and other vegetables and fruits they don't even have in those regions, and then don't even wonder why it doesn't work.
                        All too true. In addition they assume that their longevity is entirely due to their diet, neglecting everything else about their way of living. It's absurd to think that their diet (what's left of it after the alterations are made to fit current CW) superimposed on an American way of life will some how have a miraculous affect on health. It's an odd combination of reductionist and wishful thinking.

                        But I do agree with Joanie if a person goes from eating crap processed food to eating whole, home cooked foods they are bound to see an improvement in their health. Whether they will drastically increase their longevity is a whole other question.
                        Last edited by Urban Forager; 12-04-2014, 12:03 AM.
                        Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                        • #13
                          I heard something about how some long lived populations had some sort of event like a famine or war situation which resulted in individuals with weaker genetics dying and those who survived tended to have some genetic advantage. Therefore their lifestyle may be a contributing factor rather than the main cause.

                          Also, generally speaking don't Asians tend to have smaller frames and therefore you would expect a lower metabolism? I remember reading that this can also contribute to longevity (part of the reason women also tend to live longer than men?)

                          Of course these are just things I have read

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                          • #14
                            diet is certainly a correlation here and the ACTUAL okinawan diet that neck linked to involved lots of nose-to-tail eating, just like the ACTUAL sardinian diet and ACTUAL crete diet, etc.

                            western doctors come at this with a preconceived notion of "healthy eating", cherry-pick the data and bollocks everything up by taking out the critters, upping the grains and lowering the fats. little mention is made of integrating one's self more fully into family and community, fresh air, sleep and plenty of daily activity. these people don't live many decades simply by avoiding doritos.
                            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                            – Ernest Hemingway

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                              Correlation does not equal causation is true. It's also a great bumper sticker. If we look at an entire culture and their health markers are exceptional, we'd have less than common sense to not take note whether or not we've tested it in a lab.
                              I think this is a key statement which can--and should--be applied to everyone we may want to take health and longevity notes from, especially our closest family members. While emulating their habits is no guarantee, it certainly is a good guide in an otherwise undetermined existence. We know that smoking and inactivity shortens lifespans, so we avoid, why not include what seems to increase and improve? Bottom line: Don't discount empirical and anecdotal evidence.
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                              “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

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