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  • Grok-friendly hiking fare?

    I'll be spending 5 days over the Solstice doing what I love to do the most - hiking in the Olympic Mountains. This hike will cover 100 miles through two of the most amazing river valleys on the continent, many thousands of feet elevation gain and loss, and all the solitude I could ask for.

    I find, however, that I am at a loss for food. What would Grok have carried with him? A few nuts, seeds, and dried mushrooms? I don't think that will do for me. I'm used to the instant oats for breakfast, carby trail mix throughout the day, and a big ol 2-person bag of mac-n-cheese or such for dinner while out on the trail. That won't do this time.

    A couple of years ago, I tried the whole paleo hiking food thing, but I wasn't creative enough, and I left myself with nothing more than instant oats for breakfast and home-made pemmican with dehydrated mashed potatoes and veggies for the rest of my meals. By day 3, I was none too excited by eating, and was completely done with food by day 5, all while doing 20+ miles a day. It wasn't a recipe for a succesful and enjoyable hike, let me assure you. Fortunately, it was berry season.

    So this time, I need to do better. Food needs to be highly portable, lightweight, highly nutritious, and PB-friendly. It's pretty darn early in a very late-to-start summer season, so foraging opportunities will be limited.

    I do plan on making up a batch of pemmican to take along, but I was wondering if any of you Grok-stars out there can offer up any gems of advice? I was thinking of taking along a supply of my WPI powder for extra protein - thoughts? Do you have a favorite recipe you like to take along into the wilderness? How do you approach food when civilization is two mountain ranges away?

  • #2
    Some organic grass-fed beef jerky could go quite a ways. Blackwing sells some great tasting stuff.

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    • #3
      I am actually working on some ideas for us, namely my husband who does a lot more hiking then I do. Here is where we are at currently:
      -Homemade Jerky
      -Nuts
      -Dried fruits (small amount)
      -Homemade dried veggies (zucchini, squash, sweet potato chips sort of thing)
      -Dehydrated eggs (You can buy powdered eggs, premade egg breakfasts some with bacon or ham but extra ingredients, or dehydrate your own)

      There are some more organic or simple dehydrated meals that are not 'too bad'....you just have to really dig around and pick your poison so to speak....potatoes, rice, or other grains since most contain them. Maybe for one or two meals especially while doing heavy exercise it is not nearly as bad. Some of the soups and stews seem to fit closer. Its hard to find organic and non vegetarian, but you could consider adding dehydrated meat to a decent organic one.

      Several companies sell dehydrated food 'components'. Like check out this link, you can buy meat and veggies dehydrated in bulk. You can then add your own seasonings, dehydrated onions and garlic, and create your own recipes. If you dig around, you can actually find a lot of ingredients NOT from backpacking food companies and get a better price...especially for things like onions, garlic.

      If you are really adventurous, you can even dehydrate all your own food ahead of time...meat and all, and make your recipes that way. I checked out a couple books at the library to get some ideas....for now I am not ready to dehydrate meat outside of jerky....so I will buy bulk for now. Here are a couple books and you could sift through and find ideas (even if most of the recipes are high carb, there is great general advice on packing, planning, etc). If anything, they give you an idea on ratios and combining ingredients.

      http://www.amazon.com/Fork-Trail-Mou...5854897&sr=1-1
      http://www.amazon.com/Backpack-Gourm...ref=pd_sim_b_2
      http://www.amazon.com/Trail-Food-Coo...ref=pd_sim_b_1

      One last item, I have heard some folks drink yerba mate on the trail for extra 'greens', even though it is essentially just a tea. The sort of 'possible' added nutrients from it....which is debatable, but I still like it just as a tea.

      Best of luck!!!
      Last edited by Meadow; 06-06-2010, 01:35 PM.
      Erin
      Daily Vlogs
      Primal Pets Blog

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      • #4
        You could look into making your own "boil in a bag" meals. Sort of complete meals. The military does it, so there has to be a process. I think if you made something like stew or chili, then vacuum sealed it while still hot, it would keep? I think though, that I would check to see if that would be safe. I mean, you'd boil the shit out of it at camp. If it's vacuum sealed it should be ok?

        My mother in law, she cans soups and stews and various types of meat in sealer jars, and they sit in the pantry for a while before she uses them. Could the same process apply to vacuum sealing?
        SW: 235
        CW:220
        Rough start due to major carb WD.

        MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
        Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
        Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
        Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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        • #5
          This is so cool, and my hubby used to do something similar with chili's and sauces etc when we would camp pre groklings. (we don't rough it quite as much with toddlers! )

          http://pct-hike.randsco.com/Planning...s.html#recipes

          Canned fish, jerky and dry cured sausage are also great.
          The more I see the less I know for sure.
          -John Lennon

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          • #6
            For backpacking, these are epic and amazing. Most of them have sunflower oil, but other than that, as long as you don't pick the ones that have rice and potatoes, they're pretty good. Combine these with some canned chicken and you've got yourself an awesome backcountry meal.

            *NOTE ... I only use these when I'm gonna be gone more than 2 days. Depending on where you are and how cold it gets at night, any pre-cooked/prepared meal with meat/veggies might be ok for a couple days.

            You could also bring avocados, they keep well for 3-4 days before they start to get over-ripe.

            Homemade trail mix with nuts, seeds, and dried fruit (w/o added sugar) is another option.

            Or, get a few organic green apples and a jar of almond butter (if it comes in a glass jar, just transfer it to a plastic/tupperware container).

            Beef jerky, packets of tuna/salmon are pretty standard, and depending on how hot it gets, hard-boiled eggs will keep for 2-3 days.
            Subduction leads to orogeny

            My blog that I don't update as often as I should: http://primalclimber.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              If you can deal with cheese, mini BabyBels are individually wax-wrapped and can survive several days without refrigeration...

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              • #8
                These mountain house wrap fillers popped up recently, not great still, but maybe an option for some who do not mind all the 'extra' ingredients. Looking over the choices, the buffalo chicken seems to be the least carbie option......don't put with wrap, and you have a plain meat and veggie dehydrated meal.

                http://www.mtnhse.com/mm5/merchant.m...egory_Code=MHW
                Erin
                Daily Vlogs
                Primal Pets Blog

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                • #9
                  I'm not sure how to word this... but does dehydrating food reduce any of the nutrients? I think dehydrating vegetables to make chips for my work lunch sounds pretty cool, really.

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                  • #10
                    You could hunt animals and roast them over a fire.
                    .`.><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>
                    ><((((> .`.><((((>.`.><((((>.`.><(( ((>

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rivvin View Post
                      I'm not sure how to word this... but does dehydrating food reduce any of the nutrients? I think dehydrating vegetables to make chips for my work lunch sounds pretty cool, really.
                      I know the raw food advocates tend to dehydrate foods, as long as it it is say under 110 degrees I believe?? I think I have heard mentioned it does not degrade the nutrients? Maybe? Possibly something to research. (yea, that was not much help...)

                      I do know that you increase your grams of sugar per serving of course, so if you are watching carb counts you have to be careful on how much you eat at a time. I know when I have made zucchini chips and such, its amazing how much you can eat in a handful...suddenly you have eaten two zucchinis without even noticing!
                      Erin
                      Daily Vlogs
                      Primal Pets Blog

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by elorajade View Post
                        You could look into making your own "boil in a bag" meals. Sort of complete meals. The military does it, so there has to be a process. I think if you made something like stew or chili, then vacuum sealed it while still hot, it would keep? I think though, that I would check to see if that would be safe. I mean, you'd boil the shit out of it at camp. If it's vacuum sealed it should be ok?

                        My mother in law, she cans soups and stews and various types of meat in sealer jars, and they sit in the pantry for a while before she uses them. Could the same process apply to vacuum sealing?
                        You need to dehydrate your meal, put in a zip baggie, and then when you get to camp, boil some water, add it to the baggie and put the baggie in a homemade cozy (a larger size bag that you make yourself with foil backed foam, duct tape and hook and loop tape). Let sit for 10 minutes or so, and viola, your meal is ready. No need to boil in the bag, as you add boiling water to the bag.
                        "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, Guinness in one hand, steak in the other, yell 'Holy Sh**, What a Ride!" - You bet, I stole it!

                        Date: 9/14/11
                        Current Weight: 151.2
                        Inches: 360.25
                        Body Fat %: 32.7

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