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  • Yikes! Resistant starch bad?

    I think this article is premature, incomplete BS: The Link Between Carbs, Gut Microbes, and Colon Cancer - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

    “We know it depends on bacteria, and we know it depends on carbs,” says Alberto Martin, an associate immunology professor at the University of Toronto and one of the authors of the study. “This is the part of the study that’s still not solid, but we think that butyrate is somehow fueling the hyperproliferation of colon epithelial cells.” Other metabolites of carbohydrates might also be involved, he says. “It would be naïve to think it’s only butyrate.”

    The phyla of bacteria inhabiting mouse guts resembles that in human intestines, which suggests the findings could be relevant for human health. And that suggests that you could protect yourself from colon cancer by taking the same potent cocktail of targeted antibiotics, including ampicillin, metronidazole, neomycin, and vancomycin, that were fed to the mice.
    Wow! It actually suggested gut sterilization. I think there's some bad science happening here. After all the recent developments and realizations in gut bacteria, butyrate, and Colistridia, this seems suspect.
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  • #2
    From the end of that article:
    A change in diet would be a better approach than taking prophylactic antibiotics.

    “Reducing carb intake might be an approach to reducing the incidence of this type of colon cancer,” Martin says. But “before we declare war on carbs,” he warns that it would be important to undertake similar studies in humans—not just mice. “We’re really only beginning to learn about these things.”

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    • #3
      Originally posted by eats.meats.west View Post
      From the end of that article:
      A change in diet would be a better approach than taking prophylactic antibiotics.

      “Reducing carb intake might be an approach to reducing the incidence of this type of colon cancer,” Martin says. But “before we declare war on carbs,” he warns that it would be important to undertake similar studies in humans—not just mice. “We’re really only beginning to learn about these things.”
      Yeah, it just seems like the whole article is alarmist in nature and premature.
      Last edited by j3nn; 10-11-2014, 11:12 AM.
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      • #4
        I would think that calling the article premature, incomplete BS is a little over the top. Published articles in the Cell journal are legit science, so the mice studies simply indicate further human studies would be warranted as was stated in the last paragraph.
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        • #5
          That article discusses a specific type of hereditary colon cancer. It has no meaning outside that context. Mark Sisson looked at it, and I looked at him looking at it.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
            I would think that calling the article premature, incomplete BS is a little over the top. Published articles in the Cell journal are legit science, so the mice studies simply indicate further human studies would be warranted as was stated in the last paragraph.
            Not the study itself, the article's interpretation and sensationalism of it. It has buzz words laced throughout it that undermine the recent understanding of the importance of SFA and the fibers that feed them.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by tatertot View Post
              That article discusses a specific type of hereditary colon cancer. It has no meaning outside that context. Mark Sisson looked at it, and I looked at him looking at it.
              Yep. The article and its headline doesn't really put enough emphasis on this being specific and instead sloppily makes it sound like carbs = colon cancer.
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