Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nutrition and Autoimmunity - help!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by eac26 View Post
    Um, I really don't want to pry in areas where you're not asking for advice, but are you sure you want to deal with that for the rest of your life? Does he do this in other arguments too or just his health? Do you two live together and just eat separate meals? What is going to happen if kids come along? Who "wins" that argument? These kinds of things don't happen in a vacuum - what other things does he "half-ass try"?

    It's never too late to break off a relationship, especially before marriage. It only gets harder after that.
    Oh trust me. I would not be with him if he was easily angered. He only gets upset about his health problems, which makes me think he is still in denial. He was officially diagnosed a month ago. No he eats my cooking. But god knows what he eats while he is at work. Trust me when I say he has interests that he is very passionate about and has a BS in aeronautical engineering from a Big Ten school and has a very nicely paying job with the Air Force. He frequently comes up with random projects and sees them through to completion and is one of the most intelligent people I know. He is only half assed with issues of lifestyle and health.
    ...

    Comment


    • #17
      People have very high standards about changing their diet to include healthy food and exclude junk. If people insisted on seeing the research supporting the standard American diet of processed junk food, fast food, rancid factory oils, grains, and gallons of sweetened beverages, nobody'd ever be eating it.

      Comment


      • #18
        If he was just diagnosed a month ago, I can totally understand his perspective on this. Learning of a serious auto-immune condition and trying to understand the medical prognosis and treatment is very unsettling to a person.

        THEN you come along and propose a dietary solution--in effect, now giving him more to deal with when he may be currently on information overload from the PA. Surely he's seeing a PA who works with an MD. If so, it's not unusual at all for the PA to do the counseling and monitoring of a new patient. Thanks to insurance company greed, doctors get less and less time to spend with their patients.

        You seem to be critical of his medical treatment, and at this time what he needs is just support. Down the road, as he adjusts to his condition, he may be more open to reading about what nutrition has to offer him. I say reading because you'd be wise to provide him with science articles, not your opinion of what he should do.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by emmie View Post
          If he was just diagnosed a month ago, I can totally understand his perspective on this. Learning of a serious auto-immune condition and trying to understand the medical prognosis and treatment is very unsettling to a person.

          THEN you come along and propose a dietary solution--in effect, now giving him more to deal with when he may be currently on information overload from the PA. Surely he's seeing a PA who works with an MD. If so, it's not unusual at all for the PA to do the counseling and monitoring of a new patient. Thanks to insurance company greed, doctors get less and less time to spend with their patients.

          You seem to be critical of his medical treatment, and at this time what he needs is just support. Down the road, as he adjusts to his condition, he may be more open to reading about what nutrition has to offer him. I say reading because you'd be wise to provide him with science articles, not your opinion of what he should do.
          I'm critical of his medical treatment because of the encyclopedia-size list of side effects and no real hope for a long term solution. I read prednisone has as high as 80% relapse rate after you stop taking it. And Cellcept.... No. Just no. That drug terrifies the living hell out of me. He has a history of UC and has played the prednisone game before.
          ...

          Comment


          • #20
            Prednisone can be a miracle worker for some conditions but man is it rough on the body. I have a blood condition and have to take it before any surgery/bloodletting procedures because I have very low platelets and bleed too much. Took it for a month before my 1st son, which was good because I ended up needing an emergency c-section but it made my life hell. I luckily escaped the moon face and weight gain but it wreaked havoc on my brain and body. I'd do anything to avoid being on that drug for anything other than a few days pre-surgery. And my platelets went up (though are far below the bottom range of normal) when I cut out gluten and processed foods. My blood condition is defined as an auto-immune illness. Luckily it doesn't impact me other than bruising easily and afore mentioned surgery prep.

            Comment


            • #21
              But that was my point. You may be absolutely correct about the problems with his medical treatment--or you may be completely wrong. EVERY Rx has many negative side effects, but sometimes the Rx is essential. But, IMO, the issue is that he is an ADULT, and if he wants to pursue medical treatment, that's his decision. And if your view of this angers him, then perhaps you need to let it go for a while.

              Personally, if I were trying to deal with a major medical crisis and a layperson were trying to insist that I do something different, I'd be angry, too.

              Comment


              • #22
                I don't think you can change someone who doesn't want to be changed. If you buy the food, you can make sure that whatever comes into the house is healthy — mainly for your own sake and only coincidentally for his. What he eats outside the house is his responsibility. Maybe the contrast between wholesome food at home and the crap elsewhere will make a persuasive impact on him, but don't count on it.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Zanna View Post
                  Prednisone can be a miracle worker for some conditions but man is it rough on the body. I have a blood condition and have to take it before any surgery/bloodletting procedures because I have very low platelets and bleed too much. Took it for a month before my 1st son, which was good because I ended up needing an emergency c-section but it made my life hell. I luckily escaped the moon face and weight gain but it wreaked havoc on my brain and body. I'd do anything to avoid being on that drug for anything other than a few days pre-surgery. And my platelets went up (though are far below the bottom range of normal) when I cut out gluten and processed foods. My blood condition is defined as an auto-immune illness. Luckily it doesn't impact me other than bruising easily and afore mentioned surgery prep.
                  Originally posted by emmie View Post
                  But that was my point. You may be absolutely correct about the problems with his medical treatment--or you may be completely wrong. EVERY Rx has many negative side effects, but sometimes the Rx is essential. But, IMO, the issue is that he is an ADULT, and if he wants to pursue medical treatment, that's his decision. And if your view of this angers him, then perhaps you need to let it go for a while.

                  Personally, if I were trying to deal with a major medical crisis and a layperson were trying to insist that I do something different, I'd be angry, too.
                  I'm not a lay person. I'm a RN, BSN CNE. I wouldn't be so opposed to the medical treatment option if it weren't for the horrific side effects. Have you ever been on prednisone?
                  ...

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    My neighbor was on prednisone--and he blew up like a balloon--but it saved his life. Since you're a medical professional, you know that ALL Rx have negative side effects, and a good doctor will balance need against those negatives.

                    As adults we need to make informed choices. For example, I had a few serious headaches about 5 years ago that after all tests were completed, my neurologist concluded were the result of some random hormonal surges. He estimated they might never occur again--or might persist. To 'avoid' them, he wanted me to take a beta blocker daily. Since I knew (from the tests) that the headaches were uncomfortable but harmless, I refused to take them. I've never had another headache.

                    Since you know all the problems with prednisone, it seems to me that your only role in this situation is to make sure your friend is able to make an 'informed' choice about his treatment.

                    I know it must be frustrating to you, but you should also be aware of the phenomenon that I've read about and seen in family members--i.e., diagnosed with a serious illness, the individual becomes passively dependent on his/her doctor and complies with all treatment without any thought or reflection.

                    If this is what's going on here, nothing you say or do will have any effect, other than to anger him and damage your relationship.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I appreciate everyone's input. Today is day 1 of the prednisone. I am going to hope for the best and mention to the PA the possibility of budesonide instead of prednisone, as it has fewer side effects and is just as effective at treating autoimmunity. Anyone have any good go-to AIP recipes, or any tips on maintaining the AIP in general? It is so restrictive, I'm afraid we will both tire of it quickly.
                      ...

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        The main thing is to eat to satiation at every meal. Meats, fruits, veggies, starchy veg like tubers and winter squash and plantains, good oils like coconut,avocado, olive oil - are all your friends.

                        Use plenty of seasonings like leafy herbs, garlic powder, salt, black pepper - food doesn't have to taste bland, and that seems to be the mistake that a lot of people make. The Primal Blueprint cookbook on Sauces is really good.

                        One of my goto recipes is an easy chimichurri: 2-3 scallions, a handful of cilantro, juice of 1 lime, s&p, a pinch of cumin and garlic powder - blend together. Great on pork and beef.

                        Simple guacamole - an avocado, a bit of onion, some chopped cilantro, s&p; if you want a little heat you can add wasabi powder. Use jicama slices for a crunchy chip sub. Jicama also works great as a base for open faced "sandwiches".

                        My new favorite veg prep method is roasting them. Takes about 5 minutes to prep. Anything from zucchini to sweet potato to plantains can be chopped into pieces, tossed in avocado oil and spices, and roasted at 400 for 15-30 minutes depending on the veg. Meat can be cooked at the same time. Meals don't have to be complicated.

                        If you can find them, the epic bison cranberry bars are a good thing to carry around. They are the only jerky type thing that I have found that is nightshade free, and they have 16 g of protein. Its good to have something like so that you have something to turn to instead of grabbing fast food.

                        The thing to remember is that the most restrictive part is about 30 days, then gradually things are added back in. There are tons of resources at thepaleomom.com to help you all get started. A lot of the recipes on mda are aip friendly.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I have that PB sauce cookbook. Unfortunately, I have hardly looked at it since buying it. I've made the ketchup and like 2 other recipes from that book. I should use it more often. The AIP Cookbook by Mickey Trescott has gotten really good reviews on Amazon. I will def have to invest in that one.
                          I think that is my mistake: making complicated meals. I need to just go back to basics and cook simple dishes, especially on weeknight when we are both exhausted from work and don't feel like cooking.
                          I've tried those Epic bars, and they are delicious!
                          Thanks for your input!
                          ...

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by sunnyskies9 View Post
                            Yeah this all started after we started planning a wedding.... we've been together for 2.5 years, and would be extremely difficult breaking off anything at this point.
                            Hum, I dumped my ex fiancé because of his refusal to start taking care of himself and address some serious issues. We were together for 7 years. So glad I did, I am now married to a guy who is open to conversation about his health, my health, our future. Good luck in whatever decision you make but don't ever feel like you don't have choices, especially in your own happiness level.


                            Sent from my iPad using Marks Daily Apple Forum

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X