Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Insulin Resistance

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Insulin Resistance

    Just when you think you know most or all of what there is to know about something, along come things you didn't know. Insulin resistance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I am insulin resistant as part of being diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome. I have the abdominal fat to show for it, slightly elevated blood glucose, very elevated trigs, low HDL. According to the article some symptoms of i.r., which I have, include brain fog and inability to focus, intestinal bloating, weight gain, fat storage, difficulty losing weight, depression, increased hunger at times, especially my inability to stop eating carbs if I start (yes, I basically did a copy/paste of the list... why re-invent the wheel? ).

    There is one contradiction I found in the article that a low carb diet can reduce insulin resistance, yet a high fat diet can increase it. That study was done on rats, however. Overall it seems that reducing i.r. is one more reason for eating primal/paleo.

  • #2
    Magnesium deficiency causes insulin resistance and most type 2 diabetics are deficient in magnesium. I'm surprised this doesn't get more attention.
    My opinions and some justification

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for pointing that out. I never had my magnesium levels checked, just Vitamin D. A calcium & magnesium supplement is supposed to help with sleep too. I wouldn't be surprised if my mag. was low too. Maybe I'll start the cal-mag treatment again. I don't sleep well worth a s***.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Fdispenza View Post
        Thanks for pointing that out. I never had my magnesium levels checked, just Vitamin D. A calcium & magnesium supplement is supposed to help with sleep too. I wouldn't be surprised if my mag. was low too. Maybe I'll start the cal-mag treatment again. I don't sleep well worth a s***.
        Interesting. My husband is type II diabetic and a lot of what you described sounds a lot like him. I'm wanting to get him started on paleo to see if it helps him out. I will have to tell him about the supplementing too... he never seems to have energy and does not sleep well either.

        Comment


        • #5
          I haven't been on/stuck to paleo long enough to see any change, but I hope to this time. My doc has a fit over my trigs, which are sometimes >300. Trigs. are a result of carb intake, not fat, which is something that is lost on a lot of doctors. I have to especially avoid wheat, not only for the non-celiac gluten intolerance, but because once I start eating pizza, pasta or bread I can't stop. I can be full to discomfort, but I will keep eating it. Whole wheat doesn't do that to me though. I hope it works out for your hubs.

          Comment


          • #6
            To say that Mg deficiency CAUSES insulin resistance is a strong word. This link has long been recognized, and it is very controversial as to the "chicken or the egg" issue.....in other words, which comes first? Some of the first studies on this correlation were in the early 80's. Here is one of the two recent ones out of Harvard:

            Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Men and Women

            At present, the most highly defended position is that chronically high blood glucose damages the kidneys, changing the mechanisms of the Na/Mg pathway. For this reason, there is a lack of Mg reabsorption at the critical area of glomerular filtration. Because of this, the registered Mg levels will by default decline. I am not totally convinced by this logic, however it does not affect treatment that much.

            My policy is that everyone that shows metabolic syndrome markers, mostly based on HbA1c and glucose bolus testing, will start on a regimen of supplementation. This cocktail includes Magnesium, but it is not the only thing I feel is necessary. In essence, I treat all early metabolic syndrome patients as if they have marked renal impairment, with nutrient replacement similar to what is used in an emergent situation of renal failure.....nearly all are water soluble, so the body will well regulate any excess.

            Mg I usually dose like this:
            18 years old and under (I.E. Type I) 420mg for males and 350mg for females, with adjustments for weight and kidney markers (creatinine, etc)
            Adults, Type II= 400-460 mg for males and 310 mg for women, however these move a lot as well.

            I believe that the end-organ effects of high blood glucose over long periods are only beginning to be understood at all. I have seen similar findings about impairment of liver, splenic, small intestine, and gallbladder function in links to metabolic syndrome. For me, I make the assumption that an enumerable number of nutrient pathways are compromised, and proceed from there.

            Hope this helps!
            Last edited by TheyCallMeLazarus; 03-28-2014, 12:24 PM.
            "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow, that's great info. Fortunately I'm not diabetic (yet)... at least not according to my doc. My A1c has been in the mid 5s and my fasting blood glucose sometimes tops off in the high 90s to 101, 102ish. But I did show impaired glucose tolerance with a 2 hour ogtt some years ago. I'd still prefer to treat it as if I were diabetic.

              Comment


              • #8
                Fdispenza: husband developed pancreatitis back in 2010 from high trigs. I was told about paleo some time after that and dieticians had a fit with me when I asked about it "too much fat!!". I've decided somethings gotta give because his insulin was just increased and so I started my research journey.
                Good luck to you as well!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think it's fair to say magnesium deficiency causes insulin resistance.

                    Magnesium deficiency causes insulin resistance:
                    Magnesium deficiency produces insulin resistanc... [Hypertension. 1993] - PubMed - NCBI

                    Magnesium supplementation improves insulin sensitivity:
                    Oral magnesium supplementation improves insuli... [Diabetes Care. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI
                    Oral magnesium supplementation improves insul... [Diabetes Metab. 2004] - PubMed - NCBI
                    Oral magnesium supplementation reduces i... [Diabetes Obes Metab. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI
                    My opinions and some justification

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Those are great links. I just read some of them, will read more.

                      I take Lamictal for bipolar. I just found that it can cause i.r. I had i.r. before using Lamictal, but this is probably why my doc says it causes weight gain, and is not helping in weight loss. Unfortunately, when I tried tapering off Lamictal my moods were swinging like George of the Jungle.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        After four years of primal, I'm mostly a success story. My numbers are good, except that my blood sugar has shot up in the last few months. I take lots of magnesium - three different kinds. I'm probably 90% primal. Nearly everything I eat is grass-fed, pastured, organic, etc. I have lost about six inches from my waist (but still just under 40 inches.) I take a low dose of Metformin. I get good exercise. Blood sugar around 200. I am considering resistant starch. I don't want to go on insulin. But maybe my pancreas is giving out. (I'm 71.)
                        Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

                        My MDA Friday success story - Stubborn Senior's Testimonial

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When do you check your b.g.? My understanding is that it should start to go below 200 about 2 hours after a meal. If you check it right after a meal, it could be high. If you check it in the morning after being fasted all night, it could be high. It's called Dawn Phenomenon from the liver dumping glucose into the blood stream. Dawn phenomenon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Clearly I'm no expert, but these are some things to consider.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Fdispenza View Post
                            When do you check your b.g.? My understanding is that it should start to go below 200 about 2 hours after a meal. If you check it right after a meal, it could be high. If you check it in the morning after being fasted all night, it could be high. It's called Dawn Phenomenon from the liver dumping glucose into the blood stream. Dawn phenomenon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Clearly I'm no expert, but these are some things to consider.
                            Thanks, Fdispenza. Good info. In the past, I have usually checked in the morning, with the understanding that b.g. would be high then. For years, that reading has been under 150. Recently, it has been well over 200. Now I check several times a day. It goes down but not nearly enough.

                            Between meal snacking has been a problem. The snacks are usually some nuts or some hard cheese, but still....

                            Doc thought the problem might be rebound, since a few months ago my b.g. was good. There was even a day a month or so ago when I ate half a banana because it had dropped to where I was light-headed. Doc had me cut out night-time Metformin to see if that helped possible rebound. But that didn't make any difference one way or the other.

                            There has been a lot of work stress. I just got a new web design contract for an agency that desperately needs their site updated. And the other agency I have a contract with is in crisis mode. No doubt this is a factor in the high b.g.
                            Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

                            My MDA Friday success story - Stubborn Senior's Testimonial

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Stress and physical pain will also jack up b.g.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X