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The ULTIMATE and COOLEST gelatin thread EVER MADE.

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
    I'm surprised - I thought gelatin was readily digestible and broken down into it's component aminos in the stomach and small intestine. Any idea how much of it generally gets through to the gut?
    I think the aminos are readily broken down and utilized. But most sources of gelatin (at least from actual animal parts and not in powders), are held together by various cartilage and fibrous stands and things (bones anyone?) that it stands to reason the gut would have a hard time digesting and therefore out gut microbes would love feasting on. Whether it's as effective as RS for populating our gut bacteria I couldn't say, but anything that gets down there to be fermented is going to have SOME effect at least.
    Last edited by Drumroll; 03-27-2014, 04:25 PM.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Eureka5280 View Post
      I'm surprised - I thought gelatin was readily digestible and broken down into it's component aminos in the stomach and small intestine. Any idea how much of it generally gets through to the gut?
      That's a great question and I don't know the answer! My best guess: when the gelatin is in cartilage (like eating whole sardines), then some of it might be physically inaccessible to digestive enzymes... and some might make it to the distal intestine.

      Not sure about bone broth, but I don't this would be the case with Jello.
      www.caloriesproper.com

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      • #33
        Thanks, Tim!

        Still a lot to flesh out
        www.caloriesproper.com

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        • #34
          Thanks Bill - good article BTW
          __________________________________________________ _____________________________
          Eureka5280: M / 38 / 235lbs / Goal: 180lbs

          Diet: Currently experimenting with higher carb (Peat-esque) primal with emphasis on beef, dairy, seafood, sugar and a bit of starch on lifting days.

          Activities: Started Stronglifts 5x5 on 3/1/14. Adding sprints and hikes soon.
          End of Year Working Set Goals: Squats-250, Bench-200, DL-315

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
            I think the aminos are readily broken down and utilized. But most sources of gelatin (at least from actual animal parts and not in powders), are held together by various cartilage and fibrous stands and things (bones anyone?) that it stands to reason the gut would have a hard time digesting and therefore out gut microbes would love feasting on. Whether it's as effective as RS for populating our gut bacteria I couldn't say, but anything that gets down there to be fermented is going to have SOME effect at least.
            Hydrolyzed is broken down. Regular gelatin is not broken down.
            JOURNAL..
            @BabesWithBBQ.
            Gelatin/bone broth recipes blog.
            Professional Style Website.
            #TeamBrisket Shirts

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            • #36
              This is one I did a while ago:

              13456299624_45f03ae0b7.jpg

              I used some silicon glass shaped moulds that I got free with a bottle of vodka. You are meant to make ice glasses with them to keep your vodka cold.

              Made jelly with orange juice (no sugar or anything else) and set about half in the mould and put in freezer so it would go hard. The other half I left on the bench until it started to almost set, then whipped up with some coconut cream. Unmoulded jelly glasses, added the creamed jelly to the centre and into the fridge to set. Served with segmented oranges.

              Did this just for desert for myself, as DH had left a part used bottle or orange juice in the fridge when he went on a trip and I didn't want to waste it.

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              • #37
                I think maybe in that case all non-digested proteins can be fermented and good for gut health?

                It is true that gelatin is unique in its structure. There's two new amino acids that aren't the same as the "normal" amino acids...Hydroxyproline and Hydroxylysin.

                I was trying to figure out the exact cleavage sites of pepsin, trypsin, and chromotrypsin (the three main human digestive proteases) on gelatin and gave up because pepsin cleavage sites aren't as specific as I thought ( ExPASy PeptideCutter tool: available enzymes).

                HMMM. My brain is not working today at ALL.

                ---------------------------------

                A really sciencey article on beef vs. pork gelatin: http://ifrj.upm.edu.my/18%20%2802%29...J-2010-159.pdf
                JOURNAL..
                @BabesWithBBQ.
                Gelatin/bone broth recipes blog.
                Professional Style Website.
                #TeamBrisket Shirts

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by girlhk View Post
                  I make beef broth once a week or two in a slow cooker. I pour the final product into mason jars and store in the fridge. After dumping out the bones, the only vessel to clean is the slow cooker. I don't bother with straining.. I also don't use grass-fed because there's none here. I take out the fat after the broth solidifies.
                  O ok, that seems easier to take the fat out after it gels, thx! Also didn't know you could reuse the bones-I just gave some to my dog to chew on because it felt wasteful to throw them all out:P

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                  • #39
                    The fat should solidify and be "peelable" after it sets in the fridge.

                    Originally posted by Alfi56 View Post
                    O ok, that seems easier to take the fat out after it gels, thx! Also didn't know you could reuse the bones-I just gave some to my dog to chew on because it felt wasteful to throw them all out:P
                    JOURNAL..
                    @BabesWithBBQ.
                    Gelatin/bone broth recipes blog.
                    Professional Style Website.
                    #TeamBrisket Shirts

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Hi TQP! I used the green can in my decaf every morning because it's quick and easy. I've seen you mention "blooming the gelatin" a few times. Exactly what do you mean by that? I want o use my red can Pork Gelatin to try out some recipes.

                      Thanks! Great thread.

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                      • #41
                        I added gelatin to home made rice pudding, RS and gelatin, so that was a hit! But the rice pudding also had sugar so maybe not something everyone would approve of.
                        Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                        • #42
                          Just starting to learn about gelatin. Looks like Great Lakes collagen hydrolysate may be the most convenient way to take it. My main question is: what makes gelatin or collagen better than regular old protein you get in grass fed beef or bison?

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                          • #43
                            My understanding is gelatin and collagen are unessential proteins because your body can synthesize them.
                            But my thinking is if it doesn't have to synthesize them then my body can use the protein else where and my body doesn't have to work harder to heal itself

                            Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Tapatalk

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by calee View Post
                              Hi TQP! I used the green can in my decaf every morning because it's quick and easy. I've seen you mention "blooming the gelatin" a few times. Exactly what do you mean by that? I want o use my red can Pork Gelatin to try out some recipes.

                              Thanks! Great thread.
                              Hayy.

                              Basic Technique: How to Work with Gelatin | The Kitchn

                              " Blooming" Gelatin

                              From the first link:

                              1. Hydrate the Gelatin: Unlike most other ingredients we work with, gelatin can't be added directly into the recipe. It needs to be mixed with a little bit of water before being added in order to hydrate (or "bloom") the grains of gelatin. It will take on an applesauce-like consistency and eventually set into a solid if not used right away.

                              If this happens, it's best to soften it back into a liquid before adding it to the rest of the recipe. This is easily and quickly done by setting the bowl with the gelatin in a small saucepan filled with an inch of water over medium-high heat

                              Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
                              Just starting to learn about gelatin. Looks like Great Lakes collagen hydrolysate may be the most convenient way to take it. My main question is: what makes gelatin or collagen better than regular old protein you get in grass fed beef or bison?
                              GELATIN: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings - WebMD

                              The Health Benefits of Gelatin: Why I drink Green Jello

                              Gelatin, stress, longevity

                              It's a Ray Peat concept but it's also backed up by therapeutic effects on joints/hair/other connective tissues (makes sense, since gelatin is derived from connective tissues). Many have reported alleviation of joint pains and etc. If you're exercising, it also aids recovery.

                              Not all protein is created equal. The amino acid ratios are wildly different. Our ancestors ate a lot more connective tissues than we did, so they got a better calcium/phosphate and cysteine/proline+glycine ratio. Just eating muscle meat without supplementing gelatin would create a stressful imbalance of amino acids and etc in your body.

                              Originally posted by Hannakb View Post
                              My understanding is gelatin and collagen are unessential proteins because your body can synthesize them.
                              But my thinking is if it doesn't have to synthesize them then my body can use the protein else where and my body doesn't have to work harder to heal itself

                              Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Tapatalk
                              Unessential proteins means every amino acid in the protein can be (theoretically) produced by our human body. I'm not sure why people tout it as a big deal, because just because you body CAN theoretically produce said aminos, doesn't mean supplementing more of such would not be beneficial. I'm not going into activation energy or le chatelier's or whatever, but let's just say as long as I get in some of the essential amino acids daily, I don't worry about this "essential vs. non-essential" stuff. Gelatin is useful beyond a simple protein source, AND it helps your body utilize the other proteins you ingest more readily.

                              Also, eating more gelatin shifts the le chatelier equilibrium to build MORE connective tissues. Eating more protein in GENERAL shifts the le chatelier equilibrium to build MORE muscles. Eating adequate essential amino acids prevents said amino acids from becoming the limiting reagents in building muscles.

                              Probably oversimplifying the body...but at least that's how I see it. Peeps are free to correct me.
                              JOURNAL..
                              @BabesWithBBQ.
                              Gelatin/bone broth recipes blog.
                              Professional Style Website.
                              #TeamBrisket Shirts

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                              • #45
                                Just a warning. MSM has a lot of the same joint protecting and connective tissue healing properties as gelatin. Take both at the same time and...

                                I have to cut my nails frickin' every two days now, and my hair (beard and head) are hard to tame now. Yikes.
                                Last edited by Drumroll; 03-28-2014, 12:27 PM.
                                "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                                Comment

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