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  • zero salt = too few salt?

    hi there!
    i eat veggies and meat and fish and eggs. No salt anywhere.
    Is no salt at all too few salt? (if, then how much you think is about ideal?)
    greets
    My Journal Road To Sixpack (with Pictures): http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread106846.html

  • #2
    well, in a primal/evolutionary environment, salt would have come only in whole food form - plants and meat

    So not adding is not a problem from a physical perspective once you get used to it. Ideally, we should taken in much more potassium in ratio to sodium.

    See my 'produce' link below.



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    • #3
      I use Celtic sea salt. Tends to help people with adrenal fatigue and those deficient in minerals...

      Has to be organic Celtic or French sea salt though. Himalayan is good too, but the rest are filled with chemicals and pretty much garbage.

      I don't use it a ton; it's more of a supplement for me, use it after or before workouts.
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      • #4
        Pretty cool about the salt. When we were in france I bought some in the south of france and north, both in farmers markets, so I imagine its just salt, and nothin else.

        I think primal peoples would have gravitated towards salty things, we do have a lot of salt in our bodies. Animals are killed every year because they go lick the salt off the roads, something must drive them to do that.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by elorajade View Post
          Pretty cool about the salt. When we were in france I bought some in the south of france and north, both in farmers markets, so I imagine its just salt, and nothin else.

          I think primal peoples would have gravitated towards salty things, we do have a lot of salt in our bodies. Animals are killed every year because they go lick the salt off the roads, something must drive them to do that.
          Animals will also eat themselves to death on grains if they can. Just because we like the taste of something doesn't necessarily mean its good for us.
          A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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          • #6
            I read somewhere (can't remember where sorry) that you body adapts to the amount of salt you take in. Too much and the body excretes it. Not sure there is a problem with too little though.
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            • #7
              Even carbohydrates are good for us ... in the form and under the circumstances in which they occur in nature. I think that "liking the taste" of something is a valid indicator as long as it's real food and not some product which was chemically engineered to be appealing to our taste buds.
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              • #8
                Real Salt is amazing and has no garbage in it. If I don't consume enough "whole salt", i.e. with all the minerals, I get very shakey or tired.

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                • #9
                  I use pink Himalayan salt occasionally. I've heard a lot of hype about it, and don't really believe most of it but it tastes good on some veggies.

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                  • #10
                    oh and fwiw, I do use and like salt. Love celtic gray salt. Don't like Real salt.

                    Love - with a suprising yet true depth - Maldon sea salt.



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                    • #11
                      I use salt quite liberally as my food is very simple and I enjoy the extra flavour. Interestingly, when I had my sodium levels checked a couple of years back, the lab that did them told me that they more often see sodium deficiency these days than 'too high' sodium levels, which they put down to the 'eat less salt' message. As I understand it, salt negatively affects blood pressure in only a small proportion of the population.
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                      • #12
                        for me, over the long haul, it's more about the ratio of potassium to sodium than sodium persay. I do loooooove Maldon Salt.

                        http://www.seminarsinnephrology.org/...143-4/abstract
                        Volume 26, Issue 6, Pages 447-453 (November 2006)

                        9 of 12

                        The Evolution-Informed Optimal Dietary Potassium Intake of Human Beings Greatly Exceeds Current and Recommended Intakes

                        Anthony Sebastian, Lynda A. Frassetto, Deborah E. Sellmeyer, R. Curtis Morris JrAn organism best fits the environment described by its genes, an environment that prevailed during the time period (millions of years) when evolution naturally selected the genes of its ancestors—those who survived to pass on their genes. When an organism’s current environment differs from its ancestral one, the environment’s mismatch with the organism’s genome may result in functional disadvantages for the organism. The genetically conditioned nutritional requirements of human beings established themselves over millions of years in which ancestral hominins, living as hunter-gatherers, ate a diet markedly different from that of agriculturally dependent contemporary human beings. In that context, we sought to quantify the ancestral-contemporary dietary difference with respect to the supply of one of the body’s major mineral nutrients: potassium. In 159 retrojected Stone Age diets, human potassium intake averaged 400 125 mEq/d, which exceeds current and recommended intakes by more than a factor of 4. We accounted for the transition to the relatively potassium-poor modern diet by the fact that the modern diet has substantially replaced Stone Age amounts of potassium-rich plant foods (especially fruits, leafy greens, vegetable fruits, roots, and tubers), with energy-dense nutrient-poor foods (separated fats, oils, refined sugars, and refined grains), and with potassium-poor energy-rich plant foods (especially cereal grains) introduced by agriculture (circa 10,000 years ago). Given the fundamental physiologic importance of potassium, such a large magnitude of change in potassium intake invites the consideration in human beings of whether the quantitative values of potassium-influenced physiologic phenomena (eg, blood pressure, insulin and aldosterone secretion rates, and intracellular pH) currently viewed as normal, in fact disaccord with genetically conditioned norms. We discuss the potential implications of our findings in respect to human health and disease.
                        Last edited by cillakat; 05-23-2010, 01:20 PM. Reason: context



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                        • #13
                          The trouble with reducing salt is that it is the only way you are getting iodine, unless you eat fish and seaweed. Intensively farmed animals and crops are fairly depleted of this important nutrient. So unless you are eating everything organic and pastured, then you have a chance of going too low on iodine, by going too low on salt.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cillakat View Post
                            oh and fwiw, I do use and like salt. Love celtic gray salt. Don't like Real salt.

                            Love - with a suprising yet true depth - Maldon sea salt.
                            I always use Maldon salt - delicious!

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                            • #15
                              Omg, Maldon is better than butter. I don't know what it is, but sweet Jesus, it's good.

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