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Mercury in canned tuna

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  • Mercury in canned tuna

    Just curious what others think of this. I was eating a can of Wild Planet Skipjack tuna every day, since it was a cheap source of lean protein, but am wondering if that is too much. I can eat more of other types of meat, this is just convenient. The rest of my diet is mainly eggs, gelatin, bone broth and fruit. I do eat lamb and beef - I have a bunch stockpiled in the freezer. I also eat sardines sometimes but had been eating more of the tuna.

  • #2
    I had to cut down on my tuna intake because of mercury worries. I'm not quite sure if it's actually dangerous or not. The Japanese seem to consume plenty of fish and you don't hear about mercury poisoning in that country except in a few isolated incidents where many people were sickened from industrial accidents. For what it's worth, skipjack is lower in mercury than most other types of tuna. Here's a list of different types of fish ranked by their mercury content.
    Love, peace, and bacon grease.

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    • #3
      Japan is dumping tons of radiation into the Pacific Ocean every hour. I would be concerned about radiation as well as mercury. We have a geiger counter to measure sea foods & products from Japan. Abnormally high levels of radiation have already reached the west coast and is killing sea life.

      Google radiation west coast, radiation fish for more.

      Grizz

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      • #4
        Honestly, selenium is a great way to counter the effects of mercury. And all fish is rich in selenium. Does that mean you should go crazy and eat craploads of tuna? Probably not.

        But in my opinion, the greater benefit to avoiding canned tuna is all the BPA in the cans you were probably getting. This is OK, from time-to-time, but a daily dose is a pretty heavy load.

        Also, smaller fish carry fewer toxins. So think things like sardines, most shellfish, etc. Salmon is pretty clean too.

        I particularly like canned sardines because many brands (though probably not all), can sardines in liner-free cans so no BPA in most of 'em.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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        • #5
          I thought Wild Planet was pretty legit. They test their tuna for both mercury and radiation (their CEO responded to a FAQ). Also, the cans say they are BPA free again (I think they didn't for awhile).

          My costco has 6 packs of Wild Planet Albacore for 9.99 this month- I've already bought 20! My coworker often brings an awesome big ass salad for lunch, and I pull out a couple cans and we split everything....

          Originally posted by Zanna View Post
          Just curious what others think of this. I was eating a can of Wild Planet Skipjack tuna every day, since it was a cheap source of lean protein, but am wondering if that is too much. I can eat more of other types of meat, this is just convenient. The rest of my diet is mainly eggs, gelatin, bone broth and fruit. I do eat lamb and beef - I have a bunch stockpiled in the freezer. I also eat sardines sometimes but had been eating more of the tuna.

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          • #6
            i buy certified yellowfin canned tuna and still eat it (sometimes 4 days in a row if im away for work), each to their own. but try to get into the sardines in if you can. my favourite is wild pink salmon but i dont think its sustainable sadly.

            its a very real concern, but the extent, does anyone REALLY agree yet?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by iconoclast79 View Post
              I thought Wild Planet was pretty legit. They test their tuna for both mercury and radiation (their CEO responded to a FAQ). Also, the cans say they are BPA free again (I think they didn't for awhile).

              My costco has 6 packs of Wild Planet Albacore for 9.99 this month- I've already bought 20! My coworker often brings an awesome big ass salad for lunch, and I pull out a couple cans and we split everything....
              Albacore being one of the largest breeds of tuna, is really bad for accumulating toxins. As they say, "eat low on the food chain." The smaller the fish, the fewer the toxins. Tongol and skipjack are the best choices in the tuna world. I KNOW that Wild Planet has both of those in their tuna offerings.

              For salmon, stay away from King (unless it's REALLY fresh) and go for Sockeye or even generic "pink" (coho?).

              Sardines are great, obviously, because they're extremely small and mostly eat seaweeds and phytoplanktons, so don't accumulate much toxicity.

              The best from canned offerings for toxicity though, is probably anchovies! Those tiny suckers don't accumulate much of anything.
              "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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              • #8
                I like the Wild Planet sardines, favorite is with tomato sauce right now. I'll just cycle in more sardines/other meats and not rely so much on the tuna. It's good to know the skipjack is better than albacore - oddly enough, it's cheaper too!i
                Last edited by Zanna; 02-10-2014, 07:12 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zanna View Post
                  I like the Wild Planet sardines, favorite is with tomato sauce right now. I'll just cycle in more sardines/other meats and not rely so much on the tuna. It's good to know the skipjack is better than albacore - oddly enough, it's cheaper too!i
                  People tend to prefer the taste of albacore over tongol or skipjack tunas. It's more "meaty" and less "oily and fishy." It's more palatable to those who are not naturally seafood fans. That said, it is also an endangered species of tuna and becoming increasingly hard to source due to overfishing. So demand for it as the "preferred" tuna of largely seafood-eschewing Americans and the trouble sourcing it due to dwindling populations both combine to increase the cost.
                  "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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                  • #10
                    Check out Chris kresser he has done some research on the mercury in fish

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                    • #11
                      Best way to tell is to get a mercury (heavy metals) blood test. I ate Wild Alaskan fish (salmon, cod, halibut, ect) and a can of the same tuna you're eating a few times a week and my blood results were at the higher end of normal (i.e. going up). Best to check yourself to determine.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                        People tend to prefer the taste of albacore over tongol or skipjack tunas. It's more "meaty" and less "oily and fishy."
                        I enjoy all seafood and usually choose Wild Planet albacore for the higher DHA content--(most other tuna and shellfish have "zomg omega-3" on the front but 0g fat on the back). I'm wondering if I should just view it as protein and pick a more affordable one.
                        37//6'3"/185

                        My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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