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  • Questions about Duck Fat (and other saturated fats)

    I'm looking to increase my saturated fat intake greatly. I bought a small container of duck fat from the market and have been using it to cook vegetables and fish with. It tastes amazing and I feel a lot better since using it. My questions are:

    1) Should I be concerned about the quality of the fat? The stuff I bought has no labeling so I have no idea how healthy the duck that the fat came from was. I wouldn't want to be consuming fat from a low-quality animal, right?

    2) Is it a good idea to use fat for cooking? What I've been doing is melting the fat on the stove top and then coating my fish and vegetables in it, then cooking them either in the oven or in a frying pan. Is this safe? Does fat have a smoking temperature that you shouldn't go past?

    3) Are there any other saturated fats I should be using besides duck fat and coconut oil?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Duck fat is NOT a saturated fat. It is primarily MONOUNSATURATED and it also contains a pretty significant amount of omega-6 at that.

    That polyunsaturated omega-6 content will easily go rancid if exposed to heat and that can cause all sorts of information, oxidization, etc. which is not a good thing at ALL.

    And YES, fat quality is extremely important. Fat is where the majority of toxins and nasty hormones or chemicals accumulate in animals, so getting fat from animals that are less likely to have been exposed is, in my humble opinion, even more important than the muscle meat of the animal.

    Also, cooking in fat is a GREAT idea. But the only fats I ever cook with these days are coconut oil, butter, ghee, and tallow. I will use olive oil for sauces, dips, and dressings that are uncooked. Or just drizzle it on some steamed veggies after they've cooled a tad.
    Last edited by Drumroll; 01-05-2014, 08:46 PM.
    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
      But the only fats I ever cook with these days are coconut oil, butter, ghee, and tallow. I will use olive oil for sauces, dips, and dressings that are uncooked. Or just drizzle it on some steamed veggies after they've cooled a tad.
      +1

      I have also used Olive Oil to cook with when eating with someone who is a phobia of saturated fat.
      Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

      Griff's cholesterol primer
      5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
      Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
      TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
      bloodorchid is always right

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      • #4
        Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
        +1

        I have also used Olive Oil to cook with when eating with someone who is a phobia of saturated fat.
        Yeah, I have too, but that's about the only time I do that.

        Unless it's a restaurant and it's olive or vegetable oils.
        "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
          Duck fat is NOT a saturated fat. It is primarily MONOUNSATURATED and it also contains a pretty significant amount of omega-6 at that.

          That polyunsaturated omega-6 content will easily go rancid if exposed to heat and that can cause all sorts of information, oxidization, etc. which is not a good thing at ALL.

          And YES, fat quality is extremely important. Fat is where the majority of toxins and nasty hormones or chemicals accumulate in animals, so getting fat from animals that are less likely to have been exposed is, in my humble opinion, even more important than the muscle meat of the animal.

          Also, cooking in fat is a GREAT idea. But the only fats I ever cook with these days are coconut oil, butter, ghee, and tallow. I will use olive oil for sauces, dips, and dressings that are uncooked. Or just drizzle it on some steamed veggies after they've cooled a tad.
          Oh wow, thank you for clearing that up. I'd read somewhere that Duck Fat was a good idea, but there's a lot of faulty info floating around.

          In regards to Coconut Oil, does cooking it reduce or kill off the antifungal properties? Cause I don't want to use too much coconut oil so as to avoid intense die-off.

          Is Ghee good for gut health?

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          • #6
            Ghee (and butter) are both concentrated sources of short-chain fatty acids (particularly butyrate) which are readily assimilated as energy and are also the product of bacterial fermentation in your gut.

            Getting some of your body's butyrate content from dietary means (rather than relying solely on the gut), is a great way to ease the burden on your gut flora. If you're worried about gut and digestive health, eat plenty of real, lacto-fermented veggies as well. Daily if you can.

            I eat TONS of coconut oil these days and have had nothing but regular bowel movements and good digestion. So I can't specifically answer your question, but my n=1 says unless you're mainlining coconut oil, you're probably ok. And you'd get tired of it before then and switch things up for a while.

            Oh, and duck fat is not a "never use" product, but just be careful to keep it to an occasional treat. I can attest to it being fucking delicious!
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

            Comment


            • #7
              Duck fat is delicious and makes the most amazing roast potatoes. It is traditionally used as one of the main cooking fats in many parts of France. I use it whenever I roast a duck and for some days after - until it is used up! And I often buy either duck or goose fat also. But mainly I use either pork or beef fat for cooking; it is more easily available and cheaper here in the UK.

              I don't worry about omega 6 in duck fat; it is a small amount of my fat intake and I eat no seed oils etc. Then there is the famous French paradox

              "The French Paradox

              In the United States, 315 of every 100,000 middle-aged men die of heart attacks each year. In France the rate is 145 per 100,000. However, In the Gascony region, where goose and duck liver form a staple of the diet, this rate is only 80 per 100,000 (See below: Can Foie Gras aid the heart?) This phenomenon has recently gained international attention as the French Paradox --They eat more fat in Gascony than anyplace else, but they live the longest ."
              Taken from

              Duck fat compared to butter and olive oil

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              • #8
                O wow, I thought duck fat was THE fat to get.
                Black magic specialist in bangladesh

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                • #9
                  According to Cronometer, a cup of duck fat has about:

                  101 grams monounsaturated fat
                  26 gms polyunsaturated fat
                  68 gms saturated fat

                  Beef tallow (a cup) has about:

                  86 grams monounsaturated fat
                  8 gms polyunsaturated fat
                  102 gms saturated fat

                  So, for everyday cooking, the tallow is probably better - and it will make your wallet scream less. But duck fat certainly has it's uses. I've never used it in a deep fryer, but pan fried french fries in duck fat make you wish you could eat a potato based diet forever.
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                  • #10
                    Duck fat isn't going to go rancid and be destroyed by cooking, especially not the way you are using it. Keep it refrigerated and enjoy it. It's tasty stuff. One year I made my own duck fat and got a quart out of one duck.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Serro View Post
                      I'm looking to increase my saturated fat intake greatly. I bought a small container of duck fat from the market and have been using it to cook vegetables and fish with. It tastes amazing and I feel a lot better since using it. My questions are:

                      1) Should I be concerned about the quality of the fat? The stuff I bought has no labeling so I have no idea how healthy the duck that the fat came from was. I wouldn't want to be consuming fat from a low-quality animal, right?

                      2) Is it a good idea to use fat for cooking? What I've been doing is melting the fat on the stove top and then coating my fish and vegetables in it, then cooking them either in the oven or in a frying pan. Is this safe? Does fat have a smoking temperature that you shouldn't go past?

                      3) Are there any other saturated fats I should be using besides duck fat and coconut oil?

                      Thanks
                      Duck fat is no doubt delicious, but it is an unsaturated fat. If you are looking for a saturated fat, I'd recommend butter/ghee, coconut oil or cocoa butter. I would prefer them all to tallow as well as they are all higher in SFA than tallow, and tallow is already pre-cooked. Technically ghee is as well, but it is more resilient than tallow.
                      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                      • #12
                        Fearing quality poultry because of the O6 feels a little too reductive (PHD is very hostile to O6 yet lists duck fat on the food plate). Use reasonable amounts, rotate it with other fats, and learn what you can about the source.
                        37//6'3"/185

                        My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by picklepete View Post
                          Fearing quality poultry because of the O6 feels a little too reductive (PHD is very hostile to O6 yet lists duck fat on the food plate). Use reasonable amounts, rotate it with other fats, and learn what you can about the source.
                          and to calm down some of the chicken littles, game birds like ducks and geese do NOT receive any kind of hormones. (nor do chickens, even battery chickens, fwiw.) and they don't get dosed with regular antibiotics like other industrial food animals often do.

                          it makes amazing fried or roasted potatoes, is fantastic for scrambling eggs and is what you use for making duck confit.

                          it's fine in your rotation of oils.
                          As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                          Ernest Hemingway

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                          • #14
                            I would highly recommend getting your saturated fats from extra virgin organic coconut oil. The more raw it is, the better.

                            The quality of the fat and the quality of its origin is what matters the most, truly.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                              Duck fat is no doubt delicious, but it is an unsaturated fat. If you are looking for a saturated fat, I'd recommend butter/ghee, coconut oil or cocoa butter. I would prefer them all to tallow as well as they are all higher in SFA than tallow, and tallow is already pre-cooked. Technically ghee is as well, but it is more resilient than tallow.
                              OK, Taco, I admit I am picking on you. Nothing personal, but reading misinformation, especially given as wrong advice or alleged facts, drives me nuts. All you have to do is research a bit, which is pretty easy with computers, nutrition databases, and the intertubes. The USDA says that a tablespoon of duck fat will provide 4.3 grams of saturated fat, 6.3 of monounsaturated fat, and only 1.7 grams of polyunsaturated fat. FAIL, PUFA is of the least amount. That's similar to lard, BTW.

                              I presume by SFA you mean SCFA, Short Chain Fatty Acids. Yes, there is a bit in coconut oil, but inconsequential. What CO is the master of is MCFA. You guessed it, medium chain. CO is perhaps the only significant source of MCFA's.

                              All rendered animal fats, I guess qualify as "pre-cooked." Yup they are heated so that the fat will leave the cellular structure. So what?

                              I know I sound pedantic, but to the extent we can determine truths and facts, that's where I stand. No rumors, myths, or ignorance.

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