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  • Vitamin C

    What are you thoughts on this vitamin? Do we really need it at all? I haven't consumed it in months and I feel fine... never get sick or show any symptoms of deficiency.
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  • #2
    It's a cellular antioxidant and it's required for the formation of collagen. I have a feeling that eschewing it leads to a much shorter life.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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    • #3
      Meh I guess I will start eating some parsley for Vit C. Any other ideas on very low carb foods that contain a minimum amount of it?
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      • #4
        There are supposed to be ways to get it from animal sources, although I'm not too knowledgeable on that.

        If not, a cup of kale should do the trick.
        Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

        Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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        • #5
          I think Vitamins C/E are far underplayed, at-least their benefits. The medical establishment likes to de-popularize vitamins and popularize their vitamins (beta blockers, anti-depressants, aspirin).

          I take supplemental C on top of what I get in the food, great for the adrenals.
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          In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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          • #6
            Vitamin C helps your immune system fight infections. And eating plenty when not sick may help stop you getting sick. I drink rosehip tea since rosehip is a very good source for vitamin C so I assume I get some from that.

            Red Capsicums and blackcurrants both have more vitamin C than parsley.
            A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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            • #7
              Deficiency of Vita C will give you Scorbutus. And when that happens, you'll know FOR SURE!

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              • #8
                Animal source: sweetbreads (thymus and panchreas).
                Low-ish carb source: cabbage.

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                • #9
                  Scurvy is caused by vitamin C deficiency.
                  A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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                  • #10
                    Vitamin c and glucose fight for transport into cells with each other, so if you are eating very low carb, your vitamin c will be a lot lower than the average American. However, scurvy is a dreadful disease, and lemons and limes are primal and great flavor additions to a lot of savory meals. Scurvy is really horrific - blackened gums, extreme pain, bleeding into your joints... Ick.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bisous View Post
                      Vitamin c and glucose fight for transport into cells with each other, so if you are eating very low carb, your vitamin c will be a lot lower than the average American.
                      Isn't this backwards? If we don't eat glucose or things that turn into glucose, the vitamin C wouldn't be blocked and our bodies would be able to utilize it.

                      However, scurvy is a dreadful disease, and lemons and limes are primal and great flavor additions to a lot of savory meals. Scurvy is really horrific - blackened gums, extreme pain, bleeding into your joints... Ick.
                      How do you explain people who eat no plants and don't get scurvy?

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                      • #12
                        Scientifically: To get into the body, vitamin C has to be absorbed from the intestine. Glucose and vitamin C use the same transporter to get into the body from the intestine. Thus a diet high in sugar/starch will greatly diminish your absorption of vitamin C, thus anyone on a typical western diet will need to eat much more Vitamin C than an Inuit, for example.

                        This intro to an academic article sums it up in scientific terms - below that I will paste an answer from "the straight dope.com" that discusses how the Inuit got enough vitamin C not to get scurvy:

                        Academic article intro:

                        The uptake of L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and its oxidized form, dehydro-L-ascorbic acid (DHAA), was evaluated in brush border membrane vesicles isolated from adult human duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Ascorbate was taken up along the entire length of the small intestine with a threefold higher initial uptake rate in distal than proximal segments. Ascorbate uptake was Na+-dependent, potential-sensitive and saturable (Km, 200 mol/L), whereas DHAA transport involved facilitated diffusion (Km, 800 mol/L). Pharmacologic experiments were conducted to characterize further these transport mechanisms. DHAA uptake was not mediated by the fructose carrier GLUT5, the uridine transporter or the 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive anion exchanger of the apical membrane. DIDS and sulfinpyrazone , an inhibitor of the urate/lactate exchanger, both significantly reduced the initial rate of ascorbate uptake. Acidic pH inhibited ascorbate uptake, and this effect was not due to a transmembrane proton gradient. Increasing concentrations of glucose in the transport media also significantly inhibited ascorbate uptake, but no effect of glucose was seen when glucose internalization was blocked by phlorizin . Preloading the vesicles with glucose inhibited ascorbate uptake similarly, indicating that glucose interferes with the ascorbate transporter from the internal side of the membrane. The results of this study suggest that DHAA crosses the apical membrane by facilitated diffusion, whereas ascorbate transport is a Na+-dependent, electrogenic process modulated by glucose.

                        From thestraightdope.com:

                        Much of what we know about the Eskimo diet comes from the legendary arctic anthropologist and adventurer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who made several daredevil journeys through the region in the early 20th century. Stefansson noticed the same thing you did, that the traditional Eskimo diet consisted largely of meat and fish, with fruits, vegetables, and other carbohydrates--the usual source of vitamin C--accounting for as little as 2 percent of total calorie intake. Yet they didn't get scurvy.

                        Stefansson argued that the native peoples of the arctic got their vitamin C from meat that was raw or minimally cooked--cooking, it seems, destroys the vitamin. (In fact, for a long time "Eskimo" was thought to be a derisive Native American term meaning "eater of raw flesh," although this is now discounted.) Stefansson claimed the high incidence of scurvy among European explorers could be explained by their refusal to eat like the natives. He proved this to his own satisfaction by subsisting in good health for lengthy periods--one memorable odyssey lasted for five years--strictly on whatever meat and fish he and his companions could catch.

                        A few holdouts didn't buy it. To settle the matter once and for all, Stefansson and a colleague lived on a meat-only diet for one year under medical supervision at New York's Bellevue Hospital, starting in February 1928. The two ate between 100 and 140 grams of protein a day, the balance of their calories coming from fat, yet they remained scurvy free. Later in life Stefansson became a strong advocate of a high-meat diet even if you didn't live in the arctic; he professed to enjoy improved health, reduced weight, etc, from meals consisting of coffee, the occasional grapefruit, and a nice steak, presumably rare. Doesn't sound half bad, and one might note that until recently the Inuit rarely suffered from atherosclerosis and other Western ailments.

                        Vitamin C can be found in a variety of traditional Eskimo/Inuit staples, including the skin of beluga whales (known as muktuk), which is said to contain as much vitamin C as oranges. Other reported sources include the organ meats of sea mammals as well as the stomach contents of caribou. You're thinking: It'll be a mighty cold day in the arctic before they catch me eating the stomach contents of caribou. Indeed, you have to wonder whether the Inuit really ate such stuff either, since Stefansson describes it being fed to dogs.

                        Other aspects of the arctic diet also remain controversial. For example, some say the Eskimos could get vitamin C from blueberries during the summer months, while others say you'd be lucky to find enough berries to cover a bowl of Rice Chex. I say let's not sweat the details of the menu, which varied from region to region anyway. We know Eskimos got enough vitamin C in their traditional diet to survive because obviously they did.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by frogfarm View Post
                          Isn't this backwards? If we don't eat glucose or things that turn into glucose, the vitamin C wouldn't be blocked and our bodies would be able to utilize it.
                          Sorry - I did get that backwards. I mean the VLC eaters will have a lot lower vitamin C *requirements* - I'm multitasking and not doing a good job of it, I guess!

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                          • #14
                            I thought scurvy was a myth.

                            anyways i bought some parsley. has other plenty of other vitamins too so..
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                            • #15
                              I don't really know this thing, but I've read in some articles that said vitamin C doesn't prevent scurvy. The fact that carbs deplete the body of vitamin C is not why an all meat diet prevents scurvy. Hydroxylysine and Hydroxyproline are needed to prevent scurvy. Plant protein do not contain these. Vitamin C through a process of oxidation can make hydroxylysine and hydroxyproline from amino acids lysine and proline. Meat does not need vitamin C because it already contains hydroxylysine and hydroxyproline.
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