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Cappello’s almond flour pasta

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  • Cappello’s almond flour pasta

    Anybody out there tried it?

    thanks

  • #2
    In my experience ALTERNATIVE flour anything, is not good. At all.
    -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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    • #3
      Rice flour pasta is really good. Almond flour pasta sounds pretty disgusting, though.

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      • #4
        Whenever I am faced with a pasta meal I have to share in, I just ask for a bowl of the sauce and a spoon.

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        • #5
          It's pretty good but I don't have it regularly...I prefer their gnocchi.

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          • #6
            I bet it takes a whole lot of xanthan gum to bind almond flour together into a dough that can be boiled. I wouldn't eat it.

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            • #7
              Thank everyone!

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              • #8
                Pasta is so 2007.

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                • #9
                  I've never used alternative pastas. I also don't buy almond flour, or products made from it, because I have concerns about rancidity. Shelled nuts can go off pretty quickly if they aren't stored right, and once they're ground into a flour their shelf-life is even shorter.

                  So if I want nut flours (or ground flaxseed, which also goes bad really fast), I grind them myself.

                  That said, one of my criteria for deciding which processed foods are acceptable and which are not is, "Could I make this at home, with single ingredients I can buy locally with minimal difficulty, and using relatively simple equipment?" So wine, beer, or mead? Sure. Cheese and yogurt? You bet. Pickles, sauerkraut, mustards, relishes, and vinegars? No problemo.

                  But I don't know how I'd go about binding almond flour together in order to make a dough that would pass through a pasta machine and stand up to cooking. The natural characteristics of wheat flour make pasta-making easy, but almond flour doesn't have those same characteristics. So I'd want to know exactly what's in almond-flour pasta that makes it "work" as pasta--but even then I'd be unlikely to eat it due to the rancidity issue.

                  (Yeah, I know--I'm just no goddamned fun anymore. Oh, well.)

                  My go-to noodle/pasta subtitutes are squashes. Spaghetti squash is great, but I also use a peeler to make noodles from zucchini/summer squashes (especially the gigantic late-summer ones), or peeled butternut squash. I lightly sautee them in a little bit of butter, then add my sauce--which, to be honest, is the thing I really want in the first place. It's quick, easy, and doesn't steam up the kitchen.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JimenyKrickets View Post
                    Pasta is so 2007.
                    I thought it was so 1997? You couldn't go to a potluck back then without finding half the table taken up by pasta salads. It's been gratifying, in recent years, to see their number dwindle to insignificance, if not extinction. They've been nowhere in evidence at the last two potlucks I attended (though quinoa is now ubiquitous).

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                    • #11
                      So far one person could answer the OP question
                      Anybody out there tried it?

                      The internet is loads of fun.

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                      • #12
                        If you need pasta, this is what I'd recommend:



                        It's very good, particularly for baked pasta dishes. Ingredients are organic brown rice and water. That's it. For $1.99 a bag it isn't bad for once in a blue moon.

                        Making any kind of pasta a regular part of your diet is kind of a problem since there's little nutrition, it provides little satiety and the texture is a conduit for overeating - nothing like textured starch covered in fatty gravies and cheeses to add to the waistline. Almond flour sounds absolutely disgusting, and even if it tasted good I wouldn't eat something made out of ground up, cooked nuts. Rice is much safer.
                        Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks again for all the feedback and saving me 50 bucks. I will not buy now!

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