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  • Bone Broth

    I currently buy my bone broth but I want to start making it, more cost effective. Does anyone have any tips on obtaining bones and recipes? much thanks!

  • #2
    Oh it's easy! Make friends with your local butcher for obtaining bones cheap.

    Bones + water + crockpot = bone broth.

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    • #3
      Where do you buy bone broth? All the broths in the supermarket are made with flavor enhancers, even the ones that claim to be made from bones and meat. I literally went from 1-2 migraines a week to fewer than one every two months when I stopped using packaged broth/soup products.

      Whenever I roast a chicken, I put the carcass in the slow cooker, fill with water, and cook on low for 24 hours. I buy bones from my beef guy. He has ones called "soup bones" that have some meat, and some he sells as "dog bones" that have a lot of marrow. One soup bone and one dog bone, roasted, put in the slow cooker (maybe an onion), covered with water, and simmered for 24 hours, makes pretty good broth. You can add a splash of something acidic if you're really serious about leeching all the minerals out of the bones, but I dislike how that affects the taste, so I don't do it.

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      • #4
        Yeah most butchers sell soup and/or dog bones. The marrow bones are the ones you want for making stock out of so you get the nutrition out of the bones.
        ---
        ~Christine

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        • #5
          I make my broths in the crockpot too. I read a "recipe" once that suggested pre-heating the crock pot a bit, putting the bones in and pouring boiling water over them (instead of just starting with the bones and cold water). I have no idea if it makes a difference but now that's my routine. =]

          You can add onion, carrot, celery... some people add some spices...

          Whenever I cook chicken, I collect all the bones in a bag in the freezer to save them. That way even if I'm just cooking a couple of chicken thighs, I know the bones aren't going to waste. I do the same thing with veggie ends/peelings/etc to make vegetable stock.
          "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

          I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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          • #6
            I've heard that if you want to extract the most minerals from bones, you want to start by putting the bones in cold water and heating it up. Oh, I forgot to add my favorite broth/stock: turkey! I get two batches of broth from a turkey carcass, so I usually freeze the Thanksgiving leftovers and use them to make stock later in the year, too.

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            • #7
              question for the bone broth people...

              I am going to be making my own broth this weekend. I have three bones in each bag that I have. What is the ratio of bone to water?
              I grok, therefore I am.

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              • #8
                I guess it just depends on how strong you want it. I never really thought about ratios. If it's too rich, you can water it down. If it's too thin, you can reduce it.

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                • #9
                  makes sense. thanks DR!
                  I grok, therefore I am.

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                  • #10
                    I used about four pounds of bones and enough water to cover them. I roast the bones first because I think it makes the flavor better (if I start with say raw beef bones as opposed to a roasted chicken carcass). I will generally add celery tops, old carrots, and an onion. For spices I almost always add bay leaves and a handful of peppercorns. Do not add salt to your stock as it will become too salty once the liquids concentrate.

                    For chicken:
                    A few annato seeds
                    A few whole cloves
                    Sage

                    For beef
                    Thyme
                    A few cloves
                    A dash of ginger
                    Red wine (if I have any leftovers)

                    My crockpot will cook for 14 hours before turning itself off so that's generally how long I cook my stock for. I add more water as it seems necessary (don't want to boil it dry). When I'm done I've usually extracted enough gelatin that the stock will gel in the fridge. It doesn't seem like very much, but it's fairly potent. I freeze it in 1/4 cup portions in cupcake papers (once frozen I throw them into a ziptop bag). Then when I just unwrap one of the "pucks" for sauces or several to make soup.

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                    • #11
                      +1 to not adding salt. I find that unsalted broth is a lot more versatile because I can simmer it down to make a gravy/sauce, I can use it to add moisture to things (I added it to a chicken-and-sweet-potato hash I made the other day because I only had the white meat left), and I can make soups/stews. If I'm using it as a base, say in a soup, I can still salt the aromatics when they're sweating (helps draw out their moisture and soften them) without worrying that the broth will make everything too salty. I don't have to worry about really reducing it to make a thick, velvety pan sauce (if it's salted perfectly, it'll be too salty when reduced).

                      Oh, hot bone broth with a dash of salt (or, non-primal, tamari or miso paste) makes an awesome drink when you're sick/hungover.

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                      • #12
                        Can someone recommend a good slow cooker? I bought one for about $40 and it boiled the liquid on low. Thanks.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lolasmom View Post
                          Can someone recommend a good slow cooker? I bought one for about $40 and it boiled the liquid on low. Thanks.
                          Mine is like that - cooks wayyy too high. If it's only half full, it simmers on the "keep warm" setting. *sigh* It's a Rival, which is notoriously bad.

                          I've heard good things about the Faberware FSSC500. There have been a lot of threads in the Recipezaar slow cooker forum about finding slow cookers that are actually, you know, SLOW... might be a good place to browse for some suggestions.
                          "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                          I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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                          • #14
                            When I make stock, I usually take left over chicken carcasses and add in a few other bony bits, like extra wings, feet if I can find them and backs. Roast them in the oven for about an hour at 350*, along with the veg I am using in the stock--carrots, onions, garlic, celery. After that hour, I dump the whole mess into my big stock pot, cover with cold water and add in a few glugs of apple cider vinegar. Bring to a boil and skim; then add spices/herbs and let simmer partially covered. I let my chicken broth go for up to 48 hours and my beef broth go for up to 72. I roast the beef bones the same as the chicken along with the veg.

                            I strain the solids out and cool in the fridge. Then I portion it up in ice cube trays and then into ziplock bags or 1 qt ziplock bags for soups and such.
                            hth!
                            Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
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                            Re-Start date 6/23/2011
                            me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
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                            • #15
                              My 6 qt hamilton beach seems to work really well. It's the less portable version of the stay- or- go. I got the stay- or -go for my dad and he loves it. My little 2 qt hamilton beach works really well too.
                              Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
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