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What are these juices coming from my slow cooked chicken?!

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  • What are these juices coming from my slow cooked chicken?!

    Hi,

    I slow cooked a chicken last night and just coated the crock pot with a bit of butter.

    After I cooked it, there was a lot of juices remaining which I refrigerated and now there is a layer of fat on top and the remaining juices. I'm not familiar with what it's officially called? Is this gelatin? How would you use this?

    I read on MDA to discard the top layer of fat as its high in PUFA due to being chicken. This chicken is free range, no added hormones etc. No chemicals used etc. I'm from Australia and I've emailed the supplier and its legit, so shouldn't I use this fat as its not CAFO?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    When I have a non-CAFO chicken, I save any fat, bones, and skin (the skin is to render even more fat). About the only thing I do with it is to cook chicken livers in it. I'm not a big worrier about things that come from well raised animals.

    The juices are just a mixture of water and fat. They occur naturally in roasting. If your chicken is drying out when you cook it, you can either cook it covered, or salt the skin well before you roast it. If once you scoop the fat off, the liquid gels in the fridge, there's no reason you can't heat it up as broth.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
      When I have a non-CAFO chicken, I save any fat, bones, and skin (the skin is to render even more fat). About the only thing I do with it is to cook chicken livers in it. I'm not a big worrier about things that come from well raised animals.

      The juices are just a mixture of water and fat. They occur naturally in roasting. If your chicken is drying out when you cook it, you can either cook it covered, or salt the skin well before you roast it. If once you scoop the fat off, the liquid gels in the fridge, there's no reason you can't heat it up as broth.
      Thanks! I thought you had to use bones to make broth, is it as simple as heating it and then drinking it?

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      • #4
        You do need bones to make broth. But occasionally, roasting a piece of meat with bone/bones will yield some gelatin also. It happens when I make beef shank almost always.
        "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

        B*tch-lite

        Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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        • #5
          Chickens have much smaller bones than cows or lamb, so slow cooking chicken with bones will yield gelatin. It takes longer to get the gelatin from thicker bones / joints. I use it for making pate.

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          • #6
            Chickens are not high in PUFAs really, so don't waste it.
            http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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            • #7
              The liquid is stock - makes fab gravy / sauce to eat with the chicken. Or leave it overnight to gel and add it to soups etc. Use the bones to make more stock - break up the carcass, place in either a slow cooker covered with water and the juice of a lemon and cook for about 24 hours, or put in pressure cooker, cover with water and the juice of a lemon and cook for 1 hour. (I usually put a few pepper corns and bay laves in there too).

              The fat I keep and use for cooking veg, or potaoes, or even to crisp up the chicken skin. It may have some omega 6 but not a lot, and don't forget all of that lovely butter that is in there too...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by breadsauce View Post
                The liquid is stock - makes fab gravy / sauce to eat with the chicken. Or leave it overnight to gel and add it to soups etc. Use the bones to make more stock - break up the carcass, place in either a slow cooker covered with water and the juice of a lemon and cook for about 24 hours, or put in pressure cooker, cover with water and the juice of a lemon and cook for 1 hour. (I usually put a few pepper corns and bay laves in there too).

                The fat I keep and use for cooking veg, or potaoes, or even to crisp up the chicken skin. It may have some omega 6 but not a lot, and don't forget all of that lovely butter that is in there too...
                How long does it keep for before you have to freeze it?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by steven.kelly View Post
                  How long does it keep for before you have to freeze it?
                  In Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything", he says 3 days for broth. But that you can bring it back to a boil and then store it for a few more days.

                  For the fat, it should keep at least a week or two. If you go through the trouble of heating it above boiling (to remove residual water) and straining (to remove residual protein) it will keep in the fridge for months.

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                  • #10
                    The technical jargon for those juices are "yumminess". Put some veggies in with the chicken to cook. Veggies will soak up and be coated in the "yumminess". The "yumminess" will provide your body with necessary energy, minerals, and structural units for hormones. Enjoy the yumminess.

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                    • #11
                      Soup!
                      Home birthing legal mama. Unschooler. Jewish Intactivist (step away from the foreskin!). Full-term breastfeeder. Kettlebell padawan.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by steven.kelly View Post
                        How long does it keep for before you have to freeze it?
                        If I'm planning to freeze it, I do that straight away while it is really fresh. If I'm keeping it in the fridge to use, I'd leave it no more than 3 or 4 days before using it up. Longer = throw it out! Same with stock made from bones. The fat I keep in the fridge for several weeks, though again, I think it tastes better the sooner it is used.

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                        • #13
                          I use the juice to mix into rice for my husband (who is not low carb/starch) and pour over my veggies. We just did a chicken yesterday. It was delicious. When I make bone broth, I freeze the broth flat in Ziploc bags, within a day or so. I cool the broth, put it into upright bags, then when it gels I lay the bags flat in the freezer and "smoosh" the gel out flat. I thaw 1-2 days before using.
                          5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

                          "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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