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Is it necessary to add oils in your diet?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
    Also, the idea of weight gain from adding carbs back in is silly. Sure you gain "weight" but unless you are overdoing calories, you aren't gaining fat. It is water weight. A number on a scale is a terrible way to judge progress anyway. Ultimately, everyone has to find a balance of what works for them.
    Of course, a legitimate worry about carb-weight is when the added water and inflammation causes lethargy and joint and menstrual pains, stopping you from keeping active and feeling well, yet the insulin spikes and generally feeling crappy make you want to eat more and more (especially fast-release sugars).
    If you're not well adapted to high carbs (especially high starch and even moreso high fast-release starch), then that water weight and bloating could be a warning of further problems to come. Therefore, the concern is validated.
    --
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    • #17
      Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
      Personally, I am a big carb eater and I eat plenty of fat as well. But I see no reason to ever overdo it to one extreme or the other. There is something to be said about relatively balanced macros.
      Balanced macros for someone as active as you isn't really high carb, nor is it out of line with PB carbohydrate curve recommendations. I'd definitely agree that you're not afraid of carbs or starches, but it isn't like you're eating skinless chicken breast with a plate full of starch most of the time. It's funny when people disagree simply because they define the terms differently.
      The Champagne of Beards

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      • #18
        Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
        no it isn't necessary, as long as you are eating adequate fat from other sources (which it seems like you are) but why would anyone choke down dry salads or dry microwaved potatoes. perhaps a cooking lesson or 2 should be in your future?
        Exactly, oils make great seasoning but not needed

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        • #19
          Originally posted by not on the rug View Post
          I hope you aren't intentionally asking dumb questions just to get attention. Sweet potatoes sautéed in chorizo fat are a bit different than dry microwaved potatoes. And salads full of cheese are different than dry salads. If you eat those things, then you are probably ok.

          Also, the idea of weight gain from adding carbs back in is silly. Sure you gain "weight" but unless you are overdoing calories, you aren't gaining fat. It is water weight. A number on a scale is a terrible way to judge progress anyway. Ultimately, everyone has to find a balance of what works for them.
          If you really read my original post you'd see I clearly stated that I eat all these fatty food items. I mostly eat my potatoes dry but occasionally cook together. Does it make a difference whether the meat and potatoes are heated in the same pan or heated in my belly? Example - steak w/dry potato OR potatoes cooked in sausage drippings. Also I never used the term "dry salad".

          Thanks everyone for being incredibly gracious when answering my "dumb question". Your responses have been a real eye opener!
          Last edited by JULIEQUICKrunner; 10-29-2013, 06:56 PM.

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          • #20
            I feel like the term "adding" sounds like you would eat more oils and fats above what you use for cooking. If you are cooking use butter etc and don't skimp on it. Obviously don't drench a potato in olive oil though.
            http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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            • #21
              I think people just need to improve their culinary skills if they believe that adding fat is necessary for food to taste good. I have bottle of Macadamia nut oil that has lasted about 6 months and it's still going. The only real time I add a spoonful of oil when making chips or fries. You can saute vegetables with a broth or use marinades when grilling meat. I had a basic and delicious meal last night with lean grilled meat 'sauteed' vegetables and baked potatoes stuffed with creamed corn. I see added fats as mainly empty calories and poor substitutes that could be better spent on real foods. You sure as hell don't need extracted oils for nutrition. If want to eat extra fat then eat some egg yolks.
              The only overt fat I really use is a bit of coconut milk and some raw chocolate.
              Last edited by Forgotmylastusername; 10-29-2013, 09:13 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
                I think people just need to improve their culinary skills if they believe that adding fat is necessary for food to taste good. I have bottle of Macadamia nut oil that has lasted about 6 months and it's still going. The only real time I add a spoonful of oil when making chips or fries. You can saute vegetables with a broth or use marinades when grilling meat. I had a basic and delicious meal last night with lean grilled meat 'sauteed' vegetables and baked potatoes stuffed with creamed corn. I see added fats as mainly empty calories and poor substitutes that could be better spent on real foods.
                The only overt fat I really use is a bit of coconut milk and some raw chocolate.
                Eh, dude. You have to be able to use fat in order to fully realise good cooking. Of course you can do without it, but you can also cook good food without meat. Curries don't taste the same without the fat, nor do grilled onions, various sauces, baking etc
                http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Forgotmylastusername View Post
                  You can saute vegetables with a broth
                  No, you can't. You can stew vegetables in a broth. You can only saute them in fat, by definition.

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                  • #24
                    Yes, I think adding a little bit oil in your diet is healthy for your body. I use olive oil as it is healthier and it is very good for Chinese food. Its taste is also good and it has mono-saturated fat inside it.

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                    • #25
                      Olive or avocado oil for dressing
                      Butter, duck fat, tallow and sometimes bacon grease for cooking. That's all I use. I do eat small chunks of salted butter once in a while when I cook

                      I also have coconut oil but for oil-pulling (cleans the mouth quite good), so not for eating.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JulieRUNS View Post
                        I am trying not use any oils or butter while cooking and am not adding any to my salad. I eat steak, chorizo sausage, avocado, eggs, cheese, and a fish oil supplement. I make potatoes in the microwave and eat them dry. Is this ok or will my skin and hair start to suffer?
                        This is a big mistake if you are trying to model your diet based on what our ancestors ate. It isn't healthy. Back in Grok's time they used to have an abundance of coconut oil jar trees, butter stick trees, rivers of olive oil with waterfalls, cheese slice trees, etc.. If you don't add oil to your diet your calories won't be high enough so your metabolism will slow down and you'll get fat, you'll get acne, your brain won't work, and you'll get insulin resistance and diabetes. So have your oils.

                        Breakfast should start out with an 8oz glass of olive oil, a whole stick of butter on your eggs, and a whole package of bacon cooked with a whole jar of coconut oil.

                        Do it that way and you'll be vibrantly healthy, live to be 1000 years old, and have a beautiful sparkly smile like Mark does on all the pictures.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JulieRUNS View Post
                          If you really read my original post you'd see I clearly stated that I eat all these fatty food items. I mostly eat my potatoes dry but occasionally cook together. Does it make a difference whether the meat and potatoes are heated in the same pan or heated in my belly? Example - steak w/dry potato OR potatoes cooked in sausage drippings. Also I never used the term "dry salad".

                          Thanks everyone for being incredibly gracious when answering my "dumb question". Your responses have been a real eye opener!
                          you've missed the point of this entirely. you, just like so many other people here, simply don't get it. read your original post and read my original reply. the thread could have ended there. there is no reason (for health purposes or flavor purposes) that anyone should eat a dry, microwaved potato. sorry you are butt-hurt because I pointed out your ridiculousness

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JulieRUNS View Post
                            I am trying not use any oils or butter while cooking and am not adding any to my salad. I eat steak, chorizo sausage, avocado, eggs, cheese, and a fish oil supplement. I make potatoes in the microwave and eat them dry. Is this ok or will my skin and hair start to suffer?
                            It is not necessary to add any oils to your diet. They are the very definition of "empty calories," so avoiding them will benefit your health and waistline.

                            However, you really should consider dropping the fish oil supplement. Fish oil is refined the same way canola, soybean, safflower, and the other polyunsaturated oils are. Due to the hexane gas and high heat processing, all vegetable oils test to have considerable trans fat content. Fish oil is no exception, and since DHA and EPA is much more fragile than any omega 6, you can expect your fish oil supplement to be even more damaged than your least favorite seed oil. Yum, trans fats and polymerized PUFA...
                            Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by AMonkey View Post
                              Eh, dude. You have to be able to use fat in order to fully realise good cooking. Of course you can do without it, but you can also cook good food without meat. Curries don't taste the same without the fat, nor do grilled onions, various sauces, baking etc
                              You also need to realize if you're going to produce professional quality meals for each meal, you're going to have little time to do anything else and likely be overweight. Roasting, broiling and slow cooking are not only healthier than frying, but they contain a lot less calories. Not everything needs to be seared in fat. In fact, adding refined grease often takes away from the true flavor of foods.
                              Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                                You also need to realize if you're going to produce professional quality meals for each meal, you're going to have little time to do anything else and likely be overweight. Roasting, broiling and slow cooking are not only healthier than frying, but they contain a lot less calories. Not everything needs to be seared in fat. In fact, adding refined grease often takes away from the true flavor of foods.
                                gonna disagree with that one. I produce high quality/restaurant quality meals 99% of the time, and I have plenty of free time to do whatever I choose. i'm not overweight either. I do agree that roasting/broiling/stewing/slow cooking/etc are way more flavorful than frying. but certain preparations require certain ingredients. you can't sautee, stirfry, or caramelize in broth. you wouldn't scramble eggs in a dry pan. and I certainly wouldn't eat any sort of potato preparation without some sort of fat.

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