Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

less hungry eating organs instead of muscle meat

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • less hungry eating organs instead of muscle meat

    Hi all,

    Has anyone else come across this? When I first went primal I noticed a significant drop in my hunger levels, however I started to find it hard to cover the cost of the food. After reading recent posts by mark about offal and bones I switched, I dropped the muscle meat and now only eat either hearts, tongue, liver, or bones and marrow (yes alas I even got rid of the bacon cos it was so damn expensive). Thanks to the British being distinctly squeemish about their food I can buy a whole weeks worth of meat (amazingly this also means I'm eating grass fed rather than part grass part grain) for around 10 (which is think is about $15 US). My food bill has gone down around 60% and my hunger has significantly dropped once again.

    It used to be that I would need about 3 meals a day (except on fasting days) now I can eat 1 or 2 meals a day (of equal size) and don't get hungry, even after a 10hour shift at work which used to see me coming home and grabbing some kind of food. The only exception to this is on workout days where I do get quite a bit more hungry, but I'm getting leaner without dropping weight.

  • #2
    I've been trying to fit more organs into my diet as well and I have found heart and tongue to be more satisfying (I decided to start with the muscle "organs"). Maybe because organ meats contain a different nutrient profile then just muscle meat they fill you up for longer?
    ---
    ~Christine

    Comment


    • #3
      Nerdy paleo Dr. Stephan Guyenet over at Whole Health Source recently called liver the most nutritious food on earth but said he would only eat it once a week. Not sure why. Just a heads up.

      Comment


      • #4
        wah i have that happen to me!! not good for me so i serve all y organs in a bath of butter
        Get on my Level
        http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Grol View Post
          Nerdy paleo Dr. Stephan Guyenet over at Whole Health Source recently called liver the most nutritious food on earth but said he would only eat it once a week. Not sure why. Just a heads up.
          I dare say it's because of the high iron content of liver. I'll take a look.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's all about the nutrients ... and lean muscle tissue may be high protein, but organs and bone marrow is higher in all the micro-nutrients and especially: fat. Of course this flies in the face of Loren Cordain's version of the paleo diet. But what is more probable?

            A (Cordain): Paleolithic people consumed only very lean meat
            B (PB): Paleolithic people consumed meat and fatty tissue rich in both saturated and unsaturated fat (animal fat is usually a combination of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids)

            Personally, I find choice B much more plausible - and it's only fitting that we should be more satiated when we focus on the fatty cuts.
            MikeEnRegalia's Blog - Nutrition, Dieting, Exercise and other stuff ;-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Not to mention the fatty cuts taste a whole lot better. I'm thinking crispy chicken skin, lambs leg rubbed with rosemary and garlic.... oooooooo

              Comment


              • #8
                How do you cook the organs and how do you know they are grass fed?
                A steak a day keeps the doctor away

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cooking I usually fry liver in lots of butter and various spices, heart so far I have roasted with vegetables at a low heat with olive oil, the tongue is still sitting in my freezer and the marrow bones i put in a slow cooker for a couple of days with some apple cider vinegar and after the 2 days i take out most of the bone, add in a bunch of vegetables simmer for an hour and blitz.. makes incredibly tasty soup.

                  The butcher I buy my meat from gets his straight from a local farmer and so knows how the animals are kept, when i get the lambs hearts I even get a date of death on them which is always within 2 days of me getting them, I'm so tempted to eat them raw.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stevehtcyl View Post
                    marrow bones i put in a slow cooker for a couple of days with some apple cider vinegar and after the 2 days i take out most of the bone, add in a bunch of vegetables simmer for an hour and blitz.. makes incredibly tasty soup.
                    I tried cooking marrow bones in the slow cooker but I couldn't stand the smell so I chucked them. I don't know whether they went off before I cooked them or whether I just haven't become used to the smell. Next time I'll try and get really fresh bones and use apple cider and make sure I leave them a few days.

                    When you take the bone out after a few days do you eat the marrow from it or has the marrow become part of the soup?

                    Since I have no oven do you think hearts could be cooked in the slow cooker?

                    Thank you. You may have just saved my poor student arse from spending all my savings on food.
                    A steak a day keeps the doctor away

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bushrat View Post
                      I tried cooking marrow bones in the slow cooker but I couldn't stand the smell so I chucked them. I don't know whether they went off before I cooked them or whether I just haven't become used to the smell.
                      Don't know. My flat mate complains of the smell when I cook them however I think they smell extremely appetising, I think it just depends on the person.

                      When you take the bone out after a few days do you eat the marrow from it or has the marrow become part of the soup?
                      Because it's become so soft the marrow just falls right out, occasionally a little probing helps the bits far into the bone. I even eat some of the bone too, it's good eating but can be very "chalky"

                      Since I have no oven do you think hearts could be cooked in the slow cooker?
                      I should imagine so, I think most things can be cooked in a slow cooker. Check the net for heart recipes I found a tonne.

                      Thank you. You may have just saved my poor student arse from spending all my savings on food.
                      Anything for a fellow student :]

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X